Electoral Studies

An International Journal on Voting and Electoral Systems and Strategy

Electoral Studies - ISSN 0261-3794
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.283 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP):
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.287 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR):
SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journal’s impact.
Impact Factor: 1.379 (2016) Impact Factor:
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
© 2017 Journal Citation Reports ® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
5 Year Impact Factor: 2.016 (2016) Five-Year Impact Factor:
To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years.
© 2017 Journal Citation Reports ® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
Volumes: Volumes 51-56
Issues: 6 issues
ISSN: 02613794

Personal Subscription

Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Electoral Studies is an international journal covering all aspects of voting, the central act in the democratic process. Political scientists, economists, sociologists, game theorists, geographers, contemporary historians and lawyers have common, and overlapping, interests in what causes voters to act as they do, and the consequences. Electoral Studies provides a forum for these diverse approaches. It publishes fully refereed papers, both theoretical and empirical, on such topics as relationships between votes and seats, and between election outcomes and politicians' reactions; historical, sociological, or geographical correlates of voting behaviour; rational choice analysis of political acts, and critiques of such analyses; the formal and behavioural properties of electoral systems; and work in game theory, political economy, or social choice relevant to elections. The recent emergence of new democracies in many parts of the world provides a wealth of new information, and scope for testing hypotheses. On specific topics of particular interest to the community, the Journal accepts collections of 4-6 short articles that form "special symposia". Electoral Studies permits the publishing of short notes and papers extending previous empirical findings. All article formats are subject to "double blind" peer review.