Early Human Development

An international journal concerned with the continuity of fetal and postnatal life

Early Human Development - ISSN 0378-3782
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 0.758 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP):
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 0.932 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR):
SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journal’s impact.
Impact Factor: 1.913 (2015) Impact Factor:
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
© Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports 2015
5 Year Impact Factor: 2.271 (2015) Five-Year Impact Factor:
To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2014 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years.
© Journal Citation Reports 2015, Published by Thomson Reuters
Volumes: Volumes 104-115
Issues: 12 issues
ISSN: 03783782

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Description

Established as an authoritative, highly cited voice on early human development, Early Human Development provides a unique opportunity for researchers and clinicians to bridge the communication gap between disciplines. Creating a forum for the productive exchange of ideas concerning early human growth and development, the journal publishes original research and clinical papers with particular emphasis on the continuum between fetal life and the perinatal period; aspects of postnatal growth influenced by early events; and the safeguarding of the quality of human survival.

The first comprehensive and interdisciplinary journal in this area of growing importance, Early Human Development offers pertinent contributions to the following subject areas:

Fetology; perinatology; pediatrics; growth and development; obstetrics; reproduction and fertility; epidemiology; behavioural sciences; nutrition and metabolism; teratology; neurology; brain biology; developmental psychology and screening.