Computer Law & Security Review

The International Journal of Technology Law and Practice

Computer Law & Security Review - ISSN 0267-3649
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.074 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP):
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 0.382 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR):
SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journal’s impact.
Impact Factor: 0.373 (2015) Impact Factor:
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
© Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports 2015
Volumes: Volume 33
Issues: 6 issues
ISSN: 02673649

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Description

The Computer Law and Security Review (CLSR) is an international journal of technology law and practice providing a major platform for publication of high quality research, policy and legal analysis within the field of IT law and computer security. It has been published six times a year since 1985 under its founding Editor, Professor Steve Saxby. It is the leading journal of its kind in Europe and provides a robust peer reviewed medium and policy forum for dissemination of knowledge and discussion, supported by powerful Editorial and Professional Boards and an Editor of more than 30 years specialist experience in the field.

CLSR is accessible to a wide range of academics, researchers, research institutes, companies, libraries and governmental and non-governmental organisations in both the public and private sectors as well as professionals in the legal, IT and related business sectors in more than 100 countries. It is available on ScienceDirect, the world's foremost provider of electronic scientific information to more than 16 million subscribers.

CLSR authors come from leading academics, international specialists, legal professionals and early career researchers from many of the most renowned research centres and universities in the world. Contributors are also located in the major international law firms, specializing in technology law, who provide essential comment and analysis built upon widespread experience of applying IT law in practice. CLSR further welcomes policy analysis from legal specialists, the judiciary, professional and business organisations operating in IT and from those with regulatory responsibilities for information and communications technology from both the public and private sectors as it regularly contributes to consultations undertaken by the EU, Council of Europe and other bodies. Papers that reflect the outcomes of funded research e.g. from Research Councils or EU projects are welcomed. Submissions are welcomed from any part of the world. CLSR is looking for papers within the subject area that display good quality legal analysis, new lines of legal thought or policy development that go beyond mere description of Law or policy, however accurate that may be.

CLSR publishes refereed academic and practitioner papers on a wide range of legal topics such as Internet law, telecoms regulation, intellectual property, cyber-crime, surveillance and security, e-commerce, outsourcing, data protection, ePrivacy, EU and public sector ICT policy, and many others. In addition it provides a regular update on European Union developments, and national news from more than 20 jurisdictions in both Europe and the Pacific Rim.

Original ideas may be discussed in advance with the Editor, Professor Steve Saxby (s.j.saxby@soton.ac.uk) to clear the ground for a draft submission. All papers are then peer reviewed by relevant experts and feedback is given whether or not a paper is accepted or returned for further work. Submissions will normally be between 6,000-15,000 words although papers of a higher word length may also be submitted subject to negotiation with the Editor. The Editor's policy is to try and accommodate contributions of all sizes above the minimum threshold where length is dictated by the needs of the subject matter.

Opinion pieces concerning policy, legislation or case law of a minimum of 2000 words and upwards will also be considered but these will appear as comment and not as feature articles.

Please note that CLSR strongly encourages PhD students, who have not yet obtained their degree, not to submit papers unless accompanied by confirmation that the supervisor has seen the manuscript and is recommending it for publication. If the supervisor's approval can be provided, asserting that the draft manuscript has been reworked and developed with the journal's aims and expectations in mind, then it will be accepted for review.

For further information please contact the Editor, Professor Stephen Saxby, Law School, Faculty of Business and Law, The University, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ UK Tel/Ans: +44 (0) 23 8059 3404, s.j.saxby@soton.ac.uk