Journal of Ethnopharmacology

An Interdisciplinary Journal Devoted to Indigenous Drugs

Journal of Ethnopharmacology - ISSN 0378-8741
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.551 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP):
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.156 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR):
SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journal’s impact.
Impact Factor: 2.981 (2016) Impact Factor:
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
© Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports 2015
5 Year Impact Factor: 3.369 (2016) Five-Year Impact Factor:
To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2014 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years.
© Journal Citation Reports 2015, Published by Thomson Reuters
Volumes: Volumes 192-209
Issues: 18 issues
ISSN: 03788741

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Description

The Journal of Ethnopharmacology is dedicated to the exchange of information and understandings about people's use of plants, fungi, animals, microorganisms and minerals and their biological and pharmacological effects based on the principles established through international conventions. Early people confronted with illness and disease, discovered a wealth of useful therapeutic agents in the plant and animal kingdoms. The empirical knowledge of these medicinal substances and their toxic potential was passed on by oral tradition and sometimes recorded in herbals and other texts on materia medica. Many valuable drugs of today (e.g., atropine, ephedrine, tubocurarine, digoxin, reserpine) came into use through the study of indigenous remedies. Chemists continue to use plant-derived drugs (e.g., morphine, taxol, physostigmine, quinidine, emetine) as prototypes in their attempts to develop more effective and less toxic medicinals.

In recent years the preservation of local knowledge, the promotion of indigenous medical systems in primary health care, and the conservation of biodiversity have become even more of a concern to all scientists working at the interface of social and natural sciences but especially to ethnopharmacologists. Recognizing the sovereign rights of States over their natural resources, ethnopharmacologists are particularly concerned with local people's rights to further use and develop their autochthonous resources.

Accordingly, today's ethnopharmacological research embraces the multidisciplinary effort in the:

• documentation of indigenous medical knowledge,
• scientific study of indigenous medicines in order to contribute in the long-run to improved health care in the regions of study, as well as
• search for pharmacologically unique principles from existing indigenous remedies.

The Journal of Ethnopharmacology publishes original articles concerned with the observation and experimental investigation of the biological activities of plant and animal substances used in the traditional medicine of past and present cultures. The journal will particularly welcome interdisciplinary papers with an ethnopharmacological, an ethnobotanical or an ethnochemical approach to the study of indigenous drugs. Reports of anthropological and ethnobotanical field studies fall within the journal's scope. Studies involving pharmacological and toxicological mechanisms of action are especially welcome. Clinical studies on efficacy will be considered if contributing to the understanding of specific ethnopharmacological problems. The journal welcomes review articles in the above mentioned fields especially those highlighting the multi-disciplinary nature of ethnopharmacology. Commentaries are by invitation only.