Journal of Comparative Economics

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Journal of Comparative Economics - ISSN 0147-5967
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.826 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP):
SNIP measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field.
SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.065 SCImago Journal Rank (SJR):
SJR is a prestige metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. SJR uses a similar algorithm as the Google page rank; it provides a quantitative and a qualitative measure of the journal’s impact.
Impact Factor: 1.103 (2016) Impact Factor:
The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years.
© 2017 Journal Citation Reports ® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
5 Year Impact Factor: 1.865 (2016) Five-Year Impact Factor:
To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2016 to the previous five years and divided by the source items published in the previous five years.
© 2017 Journal Citation Reports ® (Clarivate Analytics, 2017)
Volumes: Volume 46
Issues: 4 issues
ISSN: 01475967

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The mission of the Journal of Comparative Economics is to lead the new orientations of research in comparative economics. Before 1989, the core of comparative economics was the comparison of economic systems with in particular the economic analysis of socialism in its different forms. In the last fifteen years, the main focus of interest of comparative economists has been the transition from socialism to capitalism. In recent years, mostly as a result of the transition experience, a new orientation of comparative economics has emerged that focuses on the comparison of the economic effects of the various institutions of capitalism, be it in the legal sphere (common law versus civil law), in the political sphere (different types of democracies and electoral regimes) or in the sphere of culture, social norms, etc. This new orientation is a natural development following the very diverse experience of transitions from socialism to capitalism. The transition experience has indeed shown with a vengeance the importance of institutions in the process of economic development.

Questions raised along these new orientations include: what institutions are critical (courts, credit markets, good regulations, etc) for successful growth?; how should institutions be measured (subjective surveys, particular laws on the books, etc); why are certain institutions, such as courts and regulatory culture, slow-moving while others, such as constitutions and electoral procedures, relatively fast-moving; why is there so much cross-sectional variance in the quality of institutions, and what kinds of initial conditions or historic natural experiments can be employed to estimate the causal impact of institutions on economic performance? The Journal of Comparative Economics will maintain its tradition of publishing the best papers on the Chinese economy and of being an important outlet for work on economies in Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union; the Journal of Comparative Economics aims to enlarge the interest of the journal to other emerging market economies.