Guide for Authors

All journal information and instructions compiled in one document (PDF) in just one mouse-click Author information pack

INTRODUCTION
• Submission of Manuscripts
• Types of paper
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
• Preparation of Manuscript
• Copyright
PREPARATION
• Artwork
• Figures
• Tables
• References
• DNA Sequences and GenBank Accession Numbers
• Citation in text
• RESEARCH DATA
• Distribution of Material
• AudioSlides
• Interactive Phylogenetic Trees
• Interactive plots
AFTER ACCEPTANCE
• Proofs
• Offprints
AUTHOR INQUIRIES



Fungal Ecology publishes investigations into all aspects of fungal ecology, including the following (not exclusive) population dynamics; adaptation; evolution; role in ecosystem functioning, nutrient cycling, decomposition, carbon allocation; ecophysiology; intra- and inter-specific mycelial interactions, fungus-plant (pathogens, mycorrhizas, lichens, endophytes), fungus-invertebrate and fungus-microbe interaction; genomics and (evolutionary) genetics; conservation and biodiversity; remote sensing; bioremediation and biodegradation; quantitative and computational aspects - modelling, indicators, complexity, informatics. The usual prerequisites for publication will be originality, clarity, and significance as relevant to a better understanding of the ecology of fungi.

Submission of Manuscripts

There are no submission fees or page charges. Submission to this journal proceeds totally online. Use the following guidelines to prepare your article. Via the homepage of this journal http://www.elsevier.com/journals you will be guided stepwise through the creation and uploading of the various files. The system automatically converts source files to a single Adobe Acrobat PDF version of the article, which is used in the peer-review process. Please note that even though manuscript source files are converted to PDF at submission for the review process, these source files are needed for further processing after acceptance. All correspondence, including notification of the Editor's decision and requests for revision, takes place by e-mail and via the author's homepage, removing the need for a hard-copy paper trail.

It is a condition of publication that all manuscripts must be written in clear and grammatical English and be submitted to the Fungal Ecology Web site at http://ees.elsevier.com/funeco. Text and tables should be submitted as Word documents, and figures should be submitted as TIFF or EPS files (300 dpi). The accompanying cover letter, outlining the basic findings of the paper and their significance, should be addressed to the Editorial Office. Authors are asked to submit the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of three to five potential reviewers within their cover letter.

Manuscripts are accepted for review with the understanding that no substantial portion of the study has been published or is under consideration for publication elsewhere and that its submission for publication has been approved by all of the authors and by the institution where the work was carried out. This should be stated in the covering letter. Manuscripts that do not meet the criteria or standards for publication in Fungal Ecology will be immediately returned to the authors, without detailed review.

Types of paper

Mini Reviews and Commentaries: Fungal Ecology review articles (about 3500 words) and commentaries are usually solicited by the Senior Editor or Editorial Board members. However, suggestions and proposals will be considered. There is no rigid format for reviews, but they should include an Abstract, an Introduction setting the background to the article, and should finish with a Conclusion section, which mentions future directions.Methodological Advances: This section of Fungal Ecology publishes articles that describe the development of tools for studying fungal ecology. Manuscripts submitted to this section will be reviewed as rigorously as our Regular Research Articles. These papers are not "Research Notes" or "Short Communications", but full articles that describe the development and evaluation of tools for analysis of fungi. Such tools include microscopy, molecular, genetic and computational/modeling methods.

Preparation of Manuscript

Authorities for species are not necessary. It is important to differentiate between genes and proteins. Therefore, all gene names and loci should be typed in italics. Most recommendations of the Council of Biology Editors should be followed; consult the CBE Style Manual, 6th ed. (Council of Biology Editors, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814). Nonstandard abbreviations should be defined at their initial appearance.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced throughout. Do not include line numbering in the manuscript. Pages should be organized as follows:

The title page (p. 1) should contain the article title, authors' names and complete affiliations, footnotes to the title, and the address for manuscript correspondence (including telephone and fax numbers and an e-mail address). Authors' home page addresses (URL) may also be provided at the authors' discretion.

The abstract (p. 2) must be a single paragraph that summarizes the main findings of the paper in less than 150 words. After the abstract a list of up to 10 index descriptors that will be useful for indexing or searching should be included.

The Introduction should be as concise as possible, without subheadings. Materials and methods should be sufficiently detailed to enable the experiments to be reproduced. Results and Discussions may be combined and may be organized into subheadings. Acknowledgments should be brief and should precede the references.

Copyright

Upon acceptance of an article, authors will be asked to complete a 'Journal Publishing Agreement' (see more information on this). An e-mail will be sent to the corresponding author confirming receipt of the manuscript together with a 'Journal Publishing Agreement' form or a link to the online version of this agreement.

Subscribers may reproduce tables of contents or prepare lists of articles including abstracts for internal circulation within their institutions. Permission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution outside the institution and for all other derivative works, including compilations and translations. If excerpts from other copyrighted works are included, the author(s) must obtain written permission from the copyright owners and credit the source(s) in the article. Elsevier has preprinted forms for use by authors in these cases.

For open access articles: Upon acceptance of an article, authors will be asked to complete an 'Exclusive License Agreement' (more information). Permitted third party reuse of open access articles is determined by the author's choice of user license.

Author rights
As an author you (or your employer or institution) have certain rights to reuse your work. More information.

If material from other copyrighted works is included, the author(s) must obtain written permission from the copyright owners and credit the source(s) in the article. Elsevier has preprinted forms for use by authors in these cases: contact Elsevier Global Rights Department, P.O. Box 800, Oxford OX5 1DX, UK; phone: (+44) 1865 843830, fax: (+44) 1865 853333, e-mail: permissions@elsevier.com

The open access publication fee for this journal is USD 3000, excluding taxes. Learn more about Elsevier's pricing policy: http://www.elsevier.com/openaccesspricing.

This journal has an embargo period of 12 months.

Please submit your article via http://ees.elsevier.com/funeco/

Research highlights
Research highlights are a short collection of bullet points that convey the core findings of the article. Research highlights are mandatory and should be submitted in a separate file in the online submission system. Please use 'Research highlights' in the file name and include 3 to 5 bullet points (maximum 85 characters per bullet point including spaces). See http://www.elsevier.com/researchhighlights for examples.

Artwork

Figures

Number figures consecutively with Arabic numerals, in order of appearance in the text. Please visit our Web site at http://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions for detailed instructions on preparing electronic artwork.

Color Figures
One color plate will be published free of charge in each article, provided that color is deemed scientifically necessary by the reviewers and the Editorial Board. Additional color figures will be charged to the author. However, if together with your accepted article, you submit usable color figures, then Elsevier will ensure, at no additional charge, that these figures will appear in color on the Web (e.g., ScienceDirect and other sites) regardless of whether these illustrations are reproduced in color in the printed version. [Please note: Because of technical complications that can arise in converting color figures to "gray scale" (for the printed version should you not opt for color in print), please submit in addition usable black-and-white files corresponding to all the color illustrations.]

Color figures for exclusive use as cover illustrations may be submitted by authors who are also submitting a manuscript for consideration. These figures do not need to relate to the manuscript being submitted but should relate to the larger scope and focus of Fungal Ecology.

Tables

Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text. Type each table on a separate page with a short descriptive title typed directly above. Place footnotes to tables below the table body and indicate them with superscript lowercase letters. Avoid vertical rules. Ensure that the data presented in tables do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article.

References

DNA Sequences and GenBank Accession Numbers

Authors wishing to enable other scientists to use the accession numbers cited in their papers via links to these sources should type this information in the following manner:

For each and every accession number cited in an article, authors should type the accession number in bold, underlined text. Letters in the accession number should always be capitalized. (See example below.) This combination of letters and format will enable the typesetter to recognize the relevant texts as accession numbers and add the required links to GenBank sequences. Example: "GenBank accession nos. AI631510, AI631511, AI632198, and BF223228, a B-cell tumor from a chronic lymphatic leukemia (GenBank accession no. BE675048), and a T-cell lymphoma (GenBank accession no. AA361117)."

Authors are encouraged to check accession numbers used very carefully. An error in a letter or number can result in a dead link. In the final version of the printed article, the accession number will not appear bold or underlined. In the final version of the electronic copy, the accession number text will be linked to the appropriate source in the NCBI databases, enabling readers to go directly to that source from the article.

Citation in text

References: References should be cited in the text by name and date, e.g. (Gucinski et al. 1995; Kramer & Boyer 1995). Only articles that have been published or are in press should be included in the references. Unpublished results or personal communications should be cited as such in the text. Please note the following examples:

Gucinski H, Vance E, Reiners WA, 1995. Potential effects of global climate change. In: Smith WK, Hinckley, TM (Eds.), Ecophysiology of Coniferous Forests. Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 309-331.

Kramer PJ, Boyer JS, 1995. Water Relations of Plants and Soils. Academic Press, San Diego.

Pedersen C, Rasmussen SW, Giese H, 2002. A genetic map of Blumeria graminis based on the functional genes, avirulence genes, and molecular markers. Fungal Genetics and Biology 35: 235-246.

El-Sayed AM, 2005. The pherobase: Database of insect pheromones and semiochemicals.
http://www.pherobase.net accessed: 20.08.2007.
Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications should not be included in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. Citation of a reference as "in press" implies that the item has been accepted for publication. Web sites should be listed giving the URL and date accessed.

[dataset] Oguro, M., Imahiro, S., Saito, S., Nakashizuka, T., 2015. Mortality data for Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions. Mendeley Data, v1. http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1.

Reference Style
There are no strict requirements on reference formatting at submission. References can be in any style or format as long as the style is consistent. Author(s) name(s), journal title/book title, chapter title/article title, year of publication, volume and issue/book chapter and the pagination must be present. The reference style used by the journal will be applied to the accepted article by Elsevier at the proof stage. Note that incorrect or missing data will be highlighted at proof stage for the author to correct. If you do wish to format the references yourself they should be arranged according to Harvard ref. style:

Text: All citations in the text should refer to:
1. Single author: the author's name (without initials, unless there is ambiguity) and the year of publication;
2. Two authors: both authors' names and the year of publication;
3. Three or more authors: first author's name followed by 'et al.' and the year of publication.
Citations may be made directly (or parenthetically). Groups of references should be listed first alphabetically, then chronologically.
Examples: 'as demonstrated (Allan, 2000a, 2000b, 1999; Allan and Jones, 1999). Kramer et al. (2010) have recently shown ....'
List: References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., placed after the year of publication.
Examples:
Reference to a journal publication:
Van der Geer, J., Hanraads, J.A.J., Lupton, R.A., 2010. The art of writing a scientific article. J. Sci. Commun. 163, 51–59.
Reference to a book:
Strunk Jr., W., White, E.B., 2000. The Elements of Style, fourth ed. Longman, New York.
Reference to a chapter in an edited book:
Mettam, G.R., Adams, L.B., 2009. How to prepare an electronic version of your article, in: Jones, B.S., Smith , R.Z. (Eds.), Introduction to the Electronic Age. E-Publishing Inc., New York, pp. 281–304.

RESEARCH DATA

This journal encourages and enables you to share data that supports your research publication where appropriate, and enables you to interlink the data with your published articles. Research data refers to the results of observations or experimentation that validate research findings. To facilitate reproducibility and data reuse, this journal also encourages you to share your software, code, models, algorithms, protocols, methods and other useful materials related to the project.

Below are a number of ways in which you can associate data with your article or make a statement about the availability of your data when submitting your manuscript. If you are sharing data in one of these ways, you are encouraged to cite the data in your manuscript and reference list. Please refer to the "References" section for more information about data citation. For more information on depositing, sharing and using research data and other relevant research materials, visit the research data page.

Data linking
If you have made your research data available in a data repository, you can link your article directly to the dataset. Elsevier collaborates with a number of repositories to link articles on ScienceDirect with relevant repositories, giving readers access to underlying data that gives them a better understanding of the research described.

There are different ways to link your datasets to your article. When available, you can directly link your dataset to your article by providing the relevant information in the submission system. For more information, visit the database linking page.

For supported data repositories a repository banner will automatically appear next to your published article on ScienceDirect.

In addition, you can link to relevant data or entities through identifiers within the text of your manuscript, using the following format: Database: xxxx (e.g., TAIR: AT1G01020; CCDC: 734053; PDB: 1XFN).

Distribution of Material

Authors who publish a research article in Fungal Ecology should be prepared freely to distribute to academic researchers for their own use any strains, cell products, or DNA clones described in the article. Nucleic acid and protein sequences must be deposited in the appropriate databases.

Mendeley Data
This journal supports Mendeley Data, enabling you to deposit any research data (including raw and processed data, video, code, software, algorithms, protocols, and methods) associated with your manuscript in a free-to-use, open access repository. Before submitting your article, you can deposit the relevant datasets to Mendeley Data. Please include the DOI of the deposited dataset(s) in your main manuscript file. The datasets will be listed and directly accessible to readers next to your published article online.

For more information, visit the Mendeley Data for journals page.

Data in Brief
You have the option of converting any or all parts of your supplementary or additional raw data into one or multiple data articles, a new kind of article that houses and describes your data. Data articles ensure that your data is actively reviewed, curated, formatted, indexed, given a DOI and publicly available to all upon publication. You are encouraged to submit your article for Data in Brief as an additional item directly alongside the revised version of your manuscript. If your research article is accepted, your data article will automatically be transferred over to Data in Brief where it will be editorially reviewed and published in the open access data journal, Data in Brief. Please note an open access fee of 500 USD is payable for publication in Data in Brief. Full details can be found on the Data in Brief website. Please use this template to write your Data in Brief.

AudioSlides

The journal encourages authors to create an AudioSlides presentation with their published article. AudioSlides are brief, webinar-style presentations that are shown next to the online article on ScienceDirect. This gives authors the opportunity to summarize their research in their own words and to help readers understand what the paper is about. More information and examples are available. Authors of this journal will automatically receive an invitation e-mail to create an AudioSlides presentation after acceptance of their paper.

Interactive Phylogenetic Trees

You can enrich your online articles by providing phylogenetic tree data files (optional) in Newick or NeXML format, which will be visualized using the interactive tree viewer embedded within the online article. Using the viewer it will be possible to zoom into certain tree areas, change the tree layout, search within the tree, and collapse/expand tree nodes and branches. Submitted tree files will also be available for downloading from your online article on ScienceDirect. Each tree must be contained in an individual data file before being uploaded separately to the online submission system, via the 'phylogenetic tree data' submission category. Newick files must have the extension .new or .nwk (note that a semicolon is needed to end the tree). Please do not enclose comments in Newick files and also delete any artificial line breaks within the tree data because these will stop the tree from showing. For NeXML, the file extension should be .xml. Please do not enclose comments in the file. Tree data submitted with other file extensions will not be processed. Please make sure that you validate your Newick/NeXML files prior to submission. More information.

Interactive plots

This journal enables you to show an Interactive Plot with your article by simply submitting a data file. Full instructions.

Proofs

One set of page proofs (as PDF files) will be sent by e-mail to the corresponding author (if we do not have an e-mail address then paper proofs will be sent by post) or, a link will be provided in the e-mail so that authors can download the files themselves. Elsevier now provides authors with PDF proofs which can be annotated; for this you will need to download the free Adobe Reader, version 9 (or higher). Instructions on how to annotate PDF files will accompany the proofs (also given online). The exact system requirements are given at the Adobe site.
If you do not wish to use the PDF annotations function, you may list the corrections (including replies to the Query Form) and return them to Elsevier in an e-mail. Please list your corrections quoting line number. If, for any reason, this is not possible, then mark the corrections and any other comments (including replies to the Query Form) on a printout of your proof and scan the pages and return via e-mail. Please use this proof only for checking the typesetting, editing, completeness and correctness of the text, tables and figures. Significant changes to the article as accepted for publication will only be considered at this stage with permission from the Editor. We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately. It is important to ensure that all corrections are sent back to us in one communication: please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility.

Offprints

The corresponding author will, at no cost, receive 25 free paper offprints, or alternatively a customized Share Link providing 50 days free access to the final published version of the article on ScienceDirect. The Share Link can be used for sharing the article via any communication channel, including email and social media. For an extra charge, paper offprints can be ordered via the offprint order form which is sent once the article is accepted for publication. Both corresponding and co-authors may order offprints at any time via Elsevier's Webshop. Corresponding authors who have published their article open access do not receive a Share Link as their final published version of the article is available open access on ScienceDirect and can be shared through the article DOI link.



Visit the Elsevier Support Center to find the answers you need. Here you will find everything from Frequently Asked Questions to ways to get in touch.
You can also check the status of your submitted article or find out when your accepted article will be published.