Guide for Authors

The journal Arthroplasty Today brings together the clinical and scientific foundations for joint replacement of the hip and knee in an open-access, online format. Arthroplasty Today solicits manuscripts of the highest quality from all areas of scientific endeavour that relate to joint replacement or the treatment of its complications, including those dealing with patient outcomes, economic and policy issues, prosthetic design, biomechanics, biomaterials, and biologic response to arthroplasty. The journal focuses on case reports.

It is the purpose of Arthroplasty Today to present material to practicing orthopaedic surgeons that will keep them abreast of developments in the field, prove useful in the care of patients, and aid in understanding the scientific foundation of this subspecialty area of joint replacement. The international members of the Editorial Board provide a worldwide perspective for the journal's area of interest. Their participation ensures that each issue of Arthroplasty Today provides the reader with timely, peer-reviewed articles of the highest quality.

Arthroplasty Today is also a forum for information relating to the advocacy mission of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

Open Access

Arthroplasty Today is an open access journal. There is usually a fee associated with publication if your manuscript is accepted. Look here for details Please note that if there is financial hardship, authors may request scholarship funding in their cover letter (funding is not guaranteed).

Editorial Policy

For all manuscripts, Arthroplasty Today follows a double-blind peer review process, and requires two external reviews to be completed before a decision is reached. The Editor-in-Chief makes the final decision.

Ethics in publishing

For information on Ethics in publishing and Ethical guidelines for journal publication see https://www.elsevier.com/publishingethics and https://www.elsevier.com/journal-authors/ethics.

IRB Approval

Manuscripts describing research involving human subjects must have Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval prior to any review process. Please note the approval in the cover letter or on a separate piece of paper. IRB documentation should be available upon request.

Conflict of Interest

All authors are required to disclose any actual or potential conflict of interest including any financial, personal or other relationships with other people or organizations within three years of beginning the submitted work that could inappropriately influence, or be perceived to influence, their work. Two Conflict of Interest Statements are required: one individual disclosure submitted by each author, signed (signature or typed), and dated; and one combined, blinded form submitted without author names but with all authors' disclosure infomation on one form.

The individual Conflict of Interest form can be found here

The combined (blinded) Conflict of Interest form can be found here.

Elsevier supports responsible sharing

Find out how you can share your research published in Elsevier journals.

Types of papers

Case Reports. Case Reports are defined as a narrative that describes for medical, scientific or educational purposes a medical problem experienced by a small number of patients (typically one to five). The report usually describes a diagnostic dilemma, unusual manifestation of the disease process, unusual treatment challenge, unanticipated early failure, or complication.

A case report follows CARE guidelines (Gagnier, J., et al. The CARE guidelines: consensus-based clinical case reporting guidelines development. Journal of Medical Case Reports 2013, 7:223) and is typically fewer than 2,000 words. Each case report will have the following components: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction, Case History, Discussion and Summary. The Case history must include: informed consent, patient information, clinical findings, timeline, diagnostic assessment, therapeutic intervention, follow-up and outcomes. In addition, the patient should share his or her perspective or experience wherever possible.

Arthroplasty in Patients with Rare Conditions. This type of format is used to highlight joint replacement in patients with a rare underlying condition (usually 1 percent or less of joint replacement patients). This type of case report is a narrative that describes the unusual treatment challenge of performing an arthroplasty because of the underlying condition. An example would be the report of a total hip replacement in a patient with spastic paralysis of the lower extremity.

This case report follows CARE guidelines (Gagnier, J., et al. The CARE guidelines: consensus-based clinical case reporting guidelines development. Journal of Medical Case Reports 2013, 7:223) and is longer than a case report (3,000 words) because of an expanded discussion section. Each case report will have the following components: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction, Case History, Discussion and Summary. The Case History must include: informed consent, patient information, clinical findings, timeline, diagnostic assessment, therapeutic intervention, follow-up and outcomes. In addition the patient should share his or her perspective or experience wherever possible. The discussion section in this format should also include a summary of historical and contemporary treatment, as well as a list of three to five key points, and a discussion subsection title "Current Controversies and Future Considerations."

Authors are also asked to submit three questions related to the manuscript with five possible multiple choice answers, a preferred response, and a short discussion of the preferred response.

Original Research Articles (Clinical and Basic Science). Arthroplasty Today accepts basic science and clinical research papers. Papers must be original, not published elsewhere, and must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Original research articles are typically fewer than 4,000 words.

Each research manuscript will have the following components: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction (state the objectives of the work and provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results), Material and methods (provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be reproduced; methods already published should be indicated by a reference), Results (results should be clear and concise), Discussion (this should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them), Conclusions (the main conclusions of the study may be presented in a short Conclusions section, which should stand alone). The manuscript must include informed consent.

Authors are also asked to submit three questions related to the manuscript with five possible multiple choice answers, a preferred response, and a short discussion of the preferred response.

Systematic Review. A systematic literature review is defined as an exhaustive review and summary of published research studies with the aim of answering a specific research question or questions. Systematic literature reviews may be qualitative (e.g. aggregating, analyzing, and reporting the results of multiple studies) and/or quantitative (e.g. employing statistical methods, such as meta-analyses to increase the effect of individual findings from multiple studies). Please note that meta-analysis should only be utilized in cases where the pooled data is from comparable study designs, examining similar procedures, and the I2 value of the meta-analysis is less than 50%.

Reviews must be original, not published elsewhere, and must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Reviews are typically under 4,000 words.

Systematic literature reviews will report the following components, based on the PRISMA Guidelines For Transparent Reporting of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction and background, Material and methods (provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be reproduced; for example: journals searched, search strategy, inclusion/exclusion criteria, quality appraisal of included studies, data analysis/statistical techniques used, etc.), Results (if a meta-analysis was conducted, please provide the results of the meta-analysis, along with the included studies, forest plot, and I2 values; note that meta-analyses with an I2 value over 50%, will not be accepted due to concerns regarding high heterogeneity across the pooled study data; include all relevant statistics for statements regarding comparative effectiveness, such as p-values, percentages, N, mean, confidence intervals, etc.), Discussion, Conclusions (the main conclusions of the study may be presented in a short Conclusions section, which should stand alone, Figures (including a study attrition chart, Additional Supporting Materials (e.g. appendices, study attrition flowchart, etc.).

Authors are also asked to submit three questions related to the manuscript with five possible multiple choice answers, a preferred response, and a short discussion of the preferred response.

Brief Communications. Brief Communications are meant to be reports that promptly disseminate new ideas and observations. These ideas may not be sufficiently mature or evaluated to merit publication as a full manuscript and yet may be of interest and importance. An example would be the report of a group of catastrophic failures of a new implant design that would serve as an early warning to the readership. Brief Communications will be limited to two printed pages, including text, tables, figures, and references. This corresponds to six double-spaced standard manuscript pages, with one page of text eliminated for every figure or table added. References should be limited to less than 10. In addition, the standard format for papers—Introduction, Material and methods, Results, Discussions, and Conclusions—may be eliminated; however, please include a brief abstract. Brief Communications will be reviewed as soon as possible and, when accepted, published in the next possible issue.

Viewpoint (opinion). A Viewpoint submission is a narrative that presents the opinion of a member or members of the arthroplasty community where intriguing, stimulating, controversial or insightful ideas are presented. These discussions on health-care policy, economics, ethics, decision making, volunteerism, or the occupational challenges of surgical staff, for example, may not necessarily be endorsed by Arthroplasty Today or the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. The authors should build a concise argument that tries to influence readership opinion, encourage critical thinking, and inspire readers to take action. This format has an introduction, body, and conclusion; objectively explains a timely issue; often references conflicting viewpoints; and takes a pro-active approach to better the problem presented (by giving constructive criticism). Each manuscript will be peer-reviewed and edited before publication. Viewpoint manuscripts should be 1000 words or fewer.

Editorial and Guest Editorial. An editorial is a narrative that presents the journal's opinion on an issue. It usually reflects the editor-in-chief's opinion or the majority of the editorial board. Editorial writers attempt to build an argument that tries to influence readership opinion, promote critical thinking, and encourage readers to take action. An editorial has an introduction, body, and conclusion; objectively explains a timely issue; often references conflicting viewpoints; and takes a pro-active approach to better the problem presented (by giving constructive criticism). Editorials should be 500 words or fewer.

Guideline/ White Paper. A white paper is a short document (2,000-3,000 words) to state an organization's policy, position, or philosophy about a subject or to pose a problem or question and then answer that question with information or a proposed solution. A white paper can serve to increase understanding of a particular issue, provide information to aid in decision making, or present a professional perspective. Often, a white paper explains the results or conclusions resulting from some organized committee, research collaboration, or design and development effort.

Each white paper will have the following components: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction, Problem statement, Proposed solutions, Future direction and long term focus and Recommendations.

Surgical Technique/ Office Tip. Technique and Tip reports are defined as a narrative that presents a unique technique or tip that is helpful in the operating room or office. This feature usually describes a novel concept that helps with efficiency or improvement in the care of the arthroplasty patient. A Surgical Technique/Office Tip report is typically fewer than 2,000 words and includes the following components: Title, Keywords, Abstract, Introduction, Surgical Technique or Office Tip, Discussion and Summary. Authors are not required to submit review questions related to technique or tip.

Letter to the Editor. Letters to the editor are usually fewer than 500 words and offer a viewpoint or experience about a manuscript previously published in Arthroplasty Today. The letter should be appropriately referenced, and clearly state questions or comments from the author(s). Authors are required to sign and send a conflict of interest statement at the time of submission.

Other. On occasion other types of manuscripts may be acceptable for submission, peer review, and publication by Arthroplasty Today. Please contact the Editorial Office with questions about potential submissions.

Information for all Manuscripts

Line spacing, line numbering, and page numbers. All submissions should have 1.5 or double spacing and continuous line numbering. Page numbers should also be present in the lower right corner of each manuscript page.

Author names and affiliations. Where the family name may be ambiguous (e.g., a double name), please indicate this clearly. Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lower-case superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address. Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name and, if available, the e-mail address of each author.

Corresponding author. Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication. Ensure that phone numbers (with country and area code) are provided in addition to the e-mail address and the complete postal address. Contact details must be kept up to date by the corresponding author.

Present/permanent address. If an author has moved since the work described in the article was done, or was visiting at the time, a 'Present address' (or 'Permanent address') may be indicated as a footnote to that author's name. The address at which the author actually did the work must be retained as the main, affiliation address. Superscript Arabic numerals are used for such footnotes.

Abstract. A structured abstract (max 250 words) is required for Original Research and Systematic Reviews. The headings for the structured abstract are always:

  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions

An unstructured abstract (max 125 words) is required for Case Report, Arthroplasty in Patients with Rare Conditions, White Paper/Guideline, Surgical Technique, and Office Tip articles.

An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be able to stand alone. For this reason, references should be avoided, but if essential, then cite the author(s) and year(s). Also, non-standard or uncommon abbreviations should be avoided, but if essential they must be defined at their first mention in the abstract itself.

Keywords. Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, using American spelling and avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of'). Be sparing with abbreviations: only abbreviations firmly established in the field may be eligible. These keywords will be used for indexing purposes.

Abbreviations. Define by writing out the entire phrase when it is first used in the manuscript, followed by the abbreviation in parentheses. Such abbreviations that are unavoidable in the abstract must be defined at their first mention there. Ensure consistency of abbreviations throughout the article.

Figure captions. Ensure that each illustration has a caption. Supply captions separately, not attached to the figure. A caption should comprise a brief title (not on the figure itself) and description of the illustration. Keep text in the illustrations themselves to a minimum but explain all symbols and abbreviations used.

Tables. Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text. Place footnotes to tables below the table body and indicate them with superscript lowercase letters. Avoid vertical rules. Be sparing in the use of tables and ensure that the data presented in tables do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article.

Acknowledgements. Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article before the references and do not, therefore, include them on the title page, as a footnote to the title or otherwise. List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.), as well as any funding sources.

Appendices. If there is more than one appendix, they should be identified as A, B, etc. Formulae and equations in appendices should be given separate numbering: Eq. (A.1), Eq. (A.2), etc.; in subsequent appendix, Eq. (B.1) and so on. Similarly for tables and figures: Table A.1; Fig. A.1, etc.

References

Citation in text

References for Arthroplasty Today are listed in the Reference section in the order that they appear in the text. Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either "Unpublished results" or "Personal communication." Citation of a reference as "in press" implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

Reference links

Increased discoverability of research and high quality peer review are ensured by online links to the sources cited. In order to allow us to create links to abstracting and indexing services such as Scopus, CrossRef and PubMed, please ensure that data provided in the references are correct. Please note that incorrect surnames, journal/book titles, publication year and pagination may prevent link creation. When copying references, please be careful as they may already contain errors. Use of the DOI is encouraged.

Web references

As a minimum, the full URL should be given and the date when the reference was last accessed. Any further information, if known (DOI, author names, dates, references to a source application, etc.), should also be given. Web references can be listed separately (e.g., after the reference list) under a different heading if desired, or can be included in the reference list.

Data references

This journal encourages you to cite underlying or relevant datasets in your manuscript by citing them in your text and including a data reference in your Reference List. Data references should include the following elements: author name(s), dataset title, data repository, version (where available), year, and global persistent identifier. Add [dataset] immediately before the reference so we can properly identify it as a data reference. This identifier will not appear in your published article.

Reference formatting

There are no strict requirements on reference formatting at submission. References can be in any style or format as long as the style is consistent. Where applicable, author(s) name(s), journal title/book title, chapter title/article title, year of publication, volume number/book chapter and the pagination must be present. Use of DOI is highly encouraged. The reference style used by the journal will be applied to the accepted article by Elsevier at the proof stage. Note that missing data will be highlighted at proof stage for the author to correct. If you do wish to format the references yourself they should be arranged according to the following examples:

Reference style

Text: Indicate references by number(s) in square brackets in line with the text. The actual authors can be referred to, but the reference number(s) must always be given.

List: Number the references (numbers in square brackets) in the list in the order in which they appear in the text.

Examples:

Reference to a journal publication:

[1] Van der Geer J, Hanraads JAJ, Lupton RA. The art of writing a scientific article. J Sci Commun 2010; 163:51-9.

Reference to a book:

[2] Strunk Jr W, White EB. The elements of style. 4th ed. New York: Longman; 2000.

Reference to a chapter in an edited book:

[3] Mettam GR, Adams LB. How to prepare and electronic version of your article. In: Jones, BS, Smith RZ, editors. Introduction to the electronic age, New York: E-Publishing Inc; 2009, p. 281-304.

[4] Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Overview of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Rockvill, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2010. Retrieved from hppt://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/nisoverview.jsp.

Data reference:

[5] Oguro M, Imahiro S, Saito S, Nakashizuka T. Mortality data for Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions, Mendeley Data, v1; 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1.

Note: Please use shortened form for last page number. e.g., 51-9, and that for more than 6 authors the first 6 should be listed followed by “et al.” For further details you can refer to "Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts submitted to Biomedical Journals" (J Am Med Assoc 1997;277:927-34) (see also http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/uniform_requirements.html).

Journal abbreviations source

Journal names should be abbreviated according to the List of Title Word

Abbreviations: http://www.issn.org/services/online-services/access-to-the-ltwa/.

Artwork

Electronic artwork

General points
• Number the illustrations according to their sequence in the text.
• Provide captions to illustrations separately.
• Submit each illustration as a separate file.

A detailed guide on electronic artwork is available on our website: https://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions.

You are urged to visit this site; some excerpts from the detailed information are given here.

Formats

If your electronic artwork is created in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) then please supply “as is” in the native document format. Regardless of the application used other than Microsoft Office, when your electronic artwork is finalized, please “Save as” or convert the images to one of the following formats (note the resolution requirements for line drawings, halftones, and line/halftone combinations given below):

EPS (orPDF): Vector drawings, embed all used fonts.

TIFF (orJPEG): Color or grayscale photographs (halftones), keep to a minimum of 300 dpi.

TIFF (orJPEG): Bitmapped (pure black & white pixels) line drawings, keep to a minimum of 1000 dpi.

TIFF (orJPEG): Combinations bitmapped line/half-tone (color or grayscale), keep to a minimum of 500 dpi.

Please do not:
• Supply files that are optimized for screen use (e.g., GIF, BMP, PICT, WPG); these typically have a low number of pixels and limited set of colors;
• Supply files that are too low in resolution;
• Submit graphics that are disproportionately large for the content.

Color artwork

Please make sure that artwork files are in an acceptable format (TIFF (or JPEG), EPS (or PDF), or MS Office files) and with the correct resolution. If, together with your accepted article, you submit usable color figures then Elsevier will ensure, at no additional charge, that these figures will appear in color on the Web (e.g., ScienceDirect and other sites) regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in color in the printed version. For color reproduction in print, you will receive information regarding the costs from Elsevier after receipt of your accepted article. Please indicate your preference for color: in print or on the Web only. For further information on the preparation of electronic artwork, please see https://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions.

Please note: Because of technical complications that can arise by converting color figures to “gray scale” (for the printed version should you not opt for color in print) please submit in addition usable black and white versions of all the color illustrations.

Illustration services

Elsevier's WebShop ( http://webshop.elsevier.com/illustrationservices) offers Illustration Services to authors preparing to submit a manuscript but concerned about the quality of the images accompanying their article. Elsevier's expert illustrators can produce scientific, technical and medical-style images, as well as a full range of charts, tables and graphs. Image “polishing” is also available, where our illustrators take your image(s) and improve them to a professional standard. Please visit the website to find out more.

Video data

Elsevier accepts video material and animation sequences to support and enhance your scientific research. In order to ensure that your video or animation material is directly usable, please provide the files in one of our recommended file formats with a preferred maximum size of 50 MB. Video and animation files supplied will be published online in the electronic version of your article in Elsevier Web products, including ScienceDirect: http://www.sciencedirect.com. Please supply “stills” with your files: you can choose any frame from the video or animation or make a separate image. These will be used instead of standard icons and will personalize the link to your video data. For more detailed instructions please visit our video instruction pages at https://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions.
Note: since video and animation cannot be embedded in the print version of the journal, please provide text for both the electronic and the print version for the portions of the article that refer to this content.

Supplementary data

Elsevier accepts electronic supplementary material to support and enhance your scientific research. Supplementary files offer the author additional possibilities to publish supporting applications, high-resolution images, background datasets, sound clips and more. Supplementary files supplied will be published online alongside the electronic version of your article in Elsevier Web products, including ScienceDirect: http://www.sciencedirect.com. Please visit our artwork instruction pages at https://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions.

Submission checklist

The following list will be useful during the final checking of an article prior to sending it to Arthroplasty Today for review. Please consult this Guide for Authors for further details of any item.

Ensure that the following items are present:

One author has been designated as the corresponding author with contact details:
• Email address
• Full postal address
• Phone numbers

All necessary files have been uploaded, and contain:
• Keywords
• All figure captions
• All tables (including title, description, footnotes)
• For Case Reports, Arthroplasty in Patients with Rare Conditions, And Original Research, three questions related to the manuscript with five possible multiple choice answers, a preferred response, and a short discussion of the preferred response.

Further considerations
• Manuscript has been "spell-checked" and "grammar-checked"
• References are in the correct format for Arthroplasty Today
• All references mentioned in the Reference list are cited in the text, and vice versa
• Permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Web)
• Color figures are clearly marked as being intended for color reproduction on the Web (free of charge) and in print, or to be reproduced in color on the Web (free of charge) and in black-and-white in print
• If only color on the Web is required, black-and-white versions of the figures are also supplied for printing purposes

For any further information please visit our customer support site at http://support.elsevier.com.