Powercards Week Two Update

This week we gained a deeper understanding of the problem we are seeking to address and the profound benefit that our solution could have for students. We have taken the first steps in our quest to create a tool, that will impact the future of medical education.

Immediately after Elsevier Hacks, we conducted a quantitative market research survey with  198 medical students from different 5 countries. We learned a lot about students’ study habits. But we wanted to dig deeper so we decided to do supplement with a qualitative study.

This past week, we designed a semi-structured interview and administered it with 6 medical students from three countries. The students were excited to share their thoughts on the struggles and challenges and what they think could help future medical students. Participants of the interviews agreed, that considerable amount of their time and energy is spent with creating study resources. which is tailored to their own study methods. Such study material often includes written or digital notes in form of bulleted list or flashcards, which often are extracted from the professor’s lecture material or the textbook of the course. The time consumed by creating the material often equals to double or even triple amount of the actual time, in which the student can acquire the needed knowledge once the material is available.

The interviews also illuminated new potential development areas. Multiple interviewees pointed out the lack of channels and resources which would facilitate collaboration between themselves and their classmates. Student groups are often forced to use generic-purpose tools of big enterprises such as google to collaborate. These tools are not designed for this purpose which limits the ways that students can work together.

Medical education all over the world suggests the principle “Learn One – Do One – Teach One” as the best way to acquire knowledge. However, there is not a comprehensive platform that grants easy access to hands-on study material, or which would allow the peer-to-peer knowledge sharing between students. In sum, our hypothesis and preliminary assumptions are supported by the results of the interview, alongside with a long list of other challenges to address.

We are at the beginning of our journey to get our product into the hands of medical students. This week we gained a deeper understanding of the problem we are seeking to address and the profound benefit that our solution could have for students. We are excited to continue learning and building!