Using technology to extract knowledge from data

October’s theme focuses on how technology can harness insights from science in our quest for progress

Technology is being used in all aspects of science and medicine, from helping doctors diagnose patients to showing governments the research they should fund based on their nation’s needs.

Now we’re using it to harness insights in a field of critical importance to the whole world: disaster science. In the past weeks, hurricanes and earthquakes have pummeled whole cities and island nations. To respond and rebuild effectively, government and industry must draw on the knowledge of the scientific community – knowledge that spans cultures, institutions and disciplines. Elsevier colleagues have worked with experts in disaster science and used cutting-edge techniques in data analytics in preparation for a report to inform scientists and policymakers. This analysis, to be released in November, aims to help government and industry reduce the damage wrought by natural disasters and develop resilience for the future. Our opening story in this series gives a preview of the findings:

Throughout the month, we will post more stories on this theme, updating this page with the links.

Quick question for you

Which terms do you most associate with Elsevier? (check all that apply)

Data and analytics
Research platforms
Technology
Decision support tools
Publishing
Books and journals
Scientific articles
Healthcare content

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Written by

Alison Bert, DMA

Written by

Alison Bert, DMA

As Executive Editor of Strategic Communications at Elsevier, Dr. Alison Bert works with contributors around the world to publish daily stories for the global science and health communities. Previously, she was Editor-in-Chief of Elsevier Connect, which won the 2016 North American Excellence Award for Science & Education.

Alison joined Elsevier in 2007 from the world of journalism, where she was a business reporter and blogger for The Journal News, a Gannett daily newspaper in New York. In the previous century, she was a classical guitarist on the music faculty of Syracuse University. She received a doctorate in music from the University of Arizona, was Fulbright scholar in Spain, and studied in a master class with Andrés Segovia.

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