Xenobiotics in Chemical Carcinogenesis

Xenobiotics in Chemical Carcinogenesis

Translational Aspects in Toxicology

1st Edition - February 17, 2022

Write a review

  • Authors: Akhileshwar Srivastava, Dhruv Kumar, Divya Singh, Rajesh Singh
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323906814
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323905602

Purchase options

Purchase options
DRM-free (PDF, EPub)
Available
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Xenobiotics in Chemical Carcinogenesis: Translational Aspects in Toxicology covers the translational toxicology of xenobiotics substances in carcinogenesis by explaining the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic, toxicogenomic, biotransformation, and resistance mechanisms in the human body. The book begins with a historical review and link to future prospects for chemical carcinogenesis. It discusses major environmental xenobiotics and their risks in inducing cancer, along with content on toxic xenobiotics and their routes of exposure in humans, the role of xenobiotic metabolism in carcinogenesis, and the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic of xenobiotics in cancer development. Lastly, the book explores current achievements such as using toxicogenomics for predicting the carcinogenicity of xenobiotic substances and the challenges posed by carcinogenic xenobiotic substances when examining preventive methods, diagnosis, and the development of anticancer drugs for specific toxicants.

Key Features

  • Covers the exposure and transmission of various toxic xenobiotics substances, including nanomaterials, to humans and their interaction with specific tissues in precipitating the development of cancers
  • Unravels the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes of toxic xenobiotics in bioaccumulation
  • Examines the genetic aberrations in cancer genomes by genetic-environmental interactions in carcinogenesis
  • Explains the biotransformation mechanisms of toxic xenobiotics by gut microbes in humans

Readership

Researchers, university professors, MSc, MPH, and early PhD students in working in the areas of toxicology, xenobiotics substances, and cancer research. Researchers, academics, graduate students in environmental science, pharmaceutical sciences, oncology, and biotechnology

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Historical review and future prospective of chemical carcinogenesis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Cancer caused by mutation or environmental factors
  • Potential of carcinogens
  • Early studies for identification of carcinogens
  • Carcinogenesis models
  • Theories for chemical carcinogenesis
  • Bioassay of carcinogens
  • Issues with carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic categorization of chemicals
  • Long-term bioassays
  • Chemical carcinogenesis and genetically engineered models
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Xenobiotic metabolism(s) in carcinogenesis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Function of aryl hydrocarbon receptors
  • Role of cytochrome P450 in the biotransformation of xenobiotics in carcinogenesis
  • Modulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes by transcription factors
  • Formation of carcinogenic xenobiotics during food processing
  • Role of pesticides in breast cancer progression
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Recalcitrant toxic xenobiotics and their routes of exposure to humans
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Recalcitrant xenobiotic molecules
  • Routes of xenobiotic exposure
  • Hazards from xenobiotic molecules
  • Xenobiotics in carcinogenesis
  • Removal of xenobiotics molecules
  • Risk assessment for exposure of humans to toxic compounds
  • Exposure to food carcinogens
  • Assessment of exposure to food carcinogens
  • Cellular adaptation to xenobiotic compounds
  • Detection of xenobiotic-induced toxicity
  • Human biomonitoring in the assessment of common population exposure to xenobiotics
  • Challenges of human biomonitoring
  • Conclusions and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Incidences of crucial environmental xenobiotics for inducing cancers
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Pesticides in carcinogenesis
  • Role of environmental agents in human cancer
  • Exposure of biomarkers and assessment of human exposures
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of xenobiotics in cancer development
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Role of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics in risk assessments
  • In silico approach to risk assessment
  • Bayesian population approach to toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic models in risk analysis
  • Systematical implication of effective biomarkers in population and occupational biomonitoring
  • The pivotal function of xenobiotic receptors and cytochrome P450 induction in toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics
  • Genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanisms of xenobiotics in carcinogenesis
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Mechanism of oxidative stress in carcinogenesis induced by xenobiotics
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Oxidative DNA damage
  • Modification of gene expression
  • Endogenous factors of ROS
  • Exogenous sources of ROS
  • Arrays of oxidative stress
  • Oxidative stress linked with xenobiotic compounds in carcinogenesis
  • Xenobiotic-induced ROS generation in embryos
  • Oxidative stress-associated mechanisms with xenobiotics in anemia cells
  • Time-dependent cellular adaptations to oxidative stress in normal cells
  • Impact of ROS and RNS on the tumor microenvironment
  • Quantitative determination of oxidative stress in cancer cells via gene expression
  • Conclusion and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Genotoxic and non-genotoxic activities of xenobiotics in carcinogenesis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • How to identify the mode of action of carcinogenic chemicals?
  • How to identify the mode of action of non-carcinogenic compounds?
  • Suppression of gap-junction intercellular communications
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8. Modulation of the epigenome by xenobiotics in cancer
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • DNA methylation in development of cancer
  • Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Carcinogenic effects of nanomaterials with an emphasis on nanoplastics
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Generation of nanoplastic in the environment
  • Major paths of human exposure to nanomaterials
  • Cellular uptake and intracellular consequences of nanoplastic materials
  • Major toxic impact of nanoplastics on human health
  • Carcinogenic impacts of nanomaterials
  • Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Endocrine disruptor activity of xenobiotics in carcinogenesis
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Endocrine regulators in the food chain
  • Endocrine disruptors action on mechanism of estrogen and androgen
  • Data associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors in carcinogenesis
  • Incidence of breast cancer due to endocrine disrupting chemicals
  • Impact of endocrine disruptors on the development of cancer in women
  • Health issues
  • Conclusions and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Environmental exposures as xenoestrogens (bisphenol A and phthalates) enhance risk for breast cancer
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Bisphenol A and breast cancer
  • Government policy for bisphenol A
  • Phthalates
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Biotransformation of toxic xenobiotics by human gut microbiota
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Habitat of microbes in human body
  • Role of microbes in health and disease
  • Microbiome regulation of toxicity
  • The metabolome of microbes
  • Function of gut microbes in cellular physiology
  • Gut microbial interactions with xenobiotics
  • The complementary chemistry of microbial xenobiotic metabolism
  • Metabolization of environmental chemicals by GI microbiota
  • Effect of environmental chemicals on the activity of GI microbes
  • Factors affecting the rate and level of gut microbes in xenobiotic metabolism
  • Advanced technologies for the identification of xenobiotic-degrading microbes
  • Computational method for the prognosis of species-specific biotransformation of xenobiotic compounds by gut microbiota
  • Methods
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Mechanism of resistance to toxic xenobiotics in humans
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Link between environmental chemicals and chemoresistance
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Profiling the reactive metabolites of xenobiotics in cancer
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Experimental methods for the assessment of reactive metabolites
  • Analysis of covalent binding to proteins
  • Trapping and identifying reactive metabolites
  • Time and cofactor-based cytochrome P450 suppression
  • High-throughput NMR in xenobiotics toxicology
  • Target analysis and suspect screening
  • Profiling of seasonal variation in and cancer risk assessment of benzo(a)pyrene and heavy metals in drinking water
  • Toxicological analysis of anthropogenic xenobiotics associated with environmental metabolomics
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Toxicogenomics for the prediction of carcinogenicity of xenobiotic substances
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Genetic toxicology: transcriptomics
  • Prediction of carcinogenicity effects of xenobiotics by toxicogenomics methods
  • Conclusions and future prospective
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 328
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: February 17, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323906814
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323905602

About the Authors

Akhileshwar Srivastava

Dr. Akhileshwar Kumar Srivastava works as a Research Associate (ICMR) in CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India. In his eight years of research, he has published more than 16 research articles and book chapters in international and national journals of repute. His research specialization is primarily in the area of pharmacognosy with genetics, metabolomics, bioinformatics, and molecular biology-associated targeting cancer diseases. In addition, he has studied at Augusta University (formerly, Georgia Regents University) in Augusta, GA, United States on a J-1 Exchange Scholar Visa and at Ben-Gurion University, Israel. He is also a life member fellow in Indian Science Congress and Agriculture, Nutrition and Health Academy, United Kingdom.

Affiliations and Expertise

Research Associate (ICMR), CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India

Dhruv Kumar

Prof. Dhruv Kumar is a Professor at Amity Institute of Molecular Medicine & Stem Cell Research (AIMMSCR), Amity University Uttar Pradesh (AUUP), Noida, and his current research is focused on autophagy, cancer cell metabolism, tumour microenvironment, exosomes, mutational heterogeneity, cancer prevention, drug designing, NGS and COVID-19. After completion of B.Sc. in Chemistry from Banaras Hindu University (BHU) and M.Sc. in Bioinformatics from University of Allahabad, India, he has completed his Ph.D. in Cellular, Molecular and Industrial Biology from the University of Bologna (UNIBO), under highly prestigious fellowship, Indo-Italian Government fellowship. After his Ph.D., he obtained Postdoctoral training at the University of Kansas Medical Center, USA. During his Postdoctoral training, he worked towards understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of autophagy regulation and apoptosis in cancer stem cells (prostate, pancreatic and breast), focusing on the metabolic cross-talk between the tumour microenvironment (cancer associated fibroblast (CAF)) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) via HGF/c-MET and bFGF/FGFR signalling pathways. He has also worked on structure based drug designing for several cancers, COVID-19, mutational heterogeneity in cancer. Currently, his lab is focusing on metabolic heterogeneity in solid tumours and structure based drug designing for cancer and COVID-19. He has published more than 80 research articles, reviews and book chapters in reputed journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Amity Institute of Molecular Medicine and Stem Cell Research (AIMMSCR), India

Divya Singh

Dr. Divya Singh is presently working as a scientist in Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Mysore, India. Her research specialization is primarily in genetics, proteomics, metabolomics, toxicology, bioinformatics, and molecular biological evaluation in various in vivo and in vitro plant models to elucidate the physiological changes and evaluate the DNA damage potency. She has published more than 10 research articles including book chapters. In addition, she is also a life member fellow of Indian Science Congress.

Affiliations and Expertise

Scientist, Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Mysore, India

Rajesh Singh

Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh is currently working as a Research Associate in Banaras Hindu University. His research focus is pharmacognosy, reverse pharmacology, drug design and discovery, extraction & isolation of natural products, cell culture, and handling of different rodents. He has published several research articles in reputable journals over the course of his career. At present, he is involved in developing an Indian origin cell line and screening drugs of natural origin for the treatment of gallbladder cancer.

Affiliations and Expertise

Research Associate, Centre of Experimental Medicine & Surgery at Banaras Hindu University, India

Ratings and Reviews

Write a review

Latest reviews

(Total rating for all reviews)

  • Prof. K. Sun Oct 10 2021

    Eagerly waiting for the release of this book

    Xenobiotics in Chemical Carcinogenesis: Translational Aspects in Toxicology book provides complete information related to the xenobiotics, starting from the chemical carcinogenesis, mechanisms (s) of disease progression, genetic-environmental interactions to the biotransformation. Looking forward to the release of this book.