Working Models of Human Perception - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780122380501, 9781483288482

Working Models of Human Perception

1st Edition

Editors: Ben A.G. Elsendoorn
eBook ISBN: 9781483288482
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st December 1988
Page Count: 514
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Description

This book devotes attention to both theoretical and applied problems simultaneously. Many applied problems turn out to be very difficult and they often need deep theoretical insight in order to get solved. In fact, applied problems often serve as a source of inspiration for theoretical work, since they usually are beyond reach of present theories and may show us in what direction theories need to be developed. The layout of the book is a reflection of the three main areas of research at the Institute for Perception Research: Hearing and Speech, Vision and Reading, Cognition and Communication. Following the set-up of the workshop, the organization of the papers is in pairs, such that the odd-numbered chapters are generally reactions to the even-numbered chapters.

Readership

Those involved in perception, vision, speech, cognition, and artificial intelligence.

Table of Contents

Overturn. A. Cohen, Perception and Language. Hearing and Speech. J.L. Goldstein, Updating Cochlear Driven Models of Auditory Perception: A New Model for Nonlinear Auditory Frequency Analysing Filters. H. Duifhuis, Current Developments in Peripheral Auditory Frequency Analysis. A.J. Fourcin, Links between Voice Pattern Perception and Production. A.J.M. Houtsma, Some Remarks on Adrian Fourcin's 'Links between Voice Pattern Perception and Production'. B.S. Atal, Speech Coding and Human Speech Perception. S.G. Nooteboom, Speech Coding, Speech Synthesis and Voice Quality. B.E.F. Lindblom, Phonetic Invariance and the Adaptive Nature of Speech. J.J. Ohala, Discussion of Bj''rn Lindblom's 'Phonetic Invariance and the Adaptive Nature of Speech'. Vision and Reading. M. Kunt, Directional Image Coding in the Context of a Visual Model. H.G. Musmann, Human Visual Perception in Image Coding: A Comment to Murat Kunt. S.M. Anstis, Models and Experiments on Directional Selectivity. J.F. Juola and G. Breitmeyer, A Discussion of Models of Motion Perception. J.K. O'Regan, Visual Acuity, Lexical Structure, and Eye Movements in Word Recognition. M.M. Taylor, Convenient Viewing and Normal Reading. Cognition and Communication. P. Wright, The Need for Theories of NOT Reading: Some Psychological Aspects of the Human-Computer Interface. D.G. Bouwhuis, Reading as Goal-Driven Behaviour. E. Leeuwenberg and F. Boselie, How Good a Bet is the Likeli

Details

No. of pages:
514
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1989
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9781483288482

About the Editor

Ben A.G. Elsendoorn

Reviews

@qu:Each main chapter is followed by a review and critique by another expert (or experts) in the field. These often highlight, in a very useful way, points of dispute and conceptual weakness. @source:--BRITISH JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY