Why Penguins Communicate - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128111789, 9780128111796

Why Penguins Communicate

1st Edition

The Evolution of Visual and Vocal Signals

Authors: Pierre Jouventin F.Stephen Dobson
eBook ISBN: 9780128111796
Paperback ISBN: 9780128111789
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 20th September 2017
Page Count: 332
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Description

Why Penguins Communicate: The Evolution of Visual and Vocal Signals is a comprehensive and condensed review of several hundred publications on the evolution of penguin behaviors, particularly signaling, linking genetics and ecology via such behavioral adaptations as nuptial displays. This exciting work has developed from the authors’ many years researching on the behavioral strategies of penguins, such as the unique vocal signatures for individual recognition. Studies of penguins on islands surrounding Antarctica are presented, fully showcasing the behavioral significance of visual ornaments (mating displays) and how and why penguins behave via adaptive evolutionary explanations.

Through this evolutionary lens, the authors address several questions involving their identification and taxonomy, habitat and location, breeding, and differences between penguins and other seabirds. Each species occupies a unique ecological niche, and behaviors permit separating the species through mutual display.

Although model organisms in science are diverse and specialized, we see the entire integration in penguins, from acoustical and optical physics, to behavioral display and speciation. This work highlights the adaptive significance of their behavior through an evolutionary point- of-view.

Key Features

  • Provides a focused view on visual and vocal communication behavior, also presenting the family of penguins as a model for acoustical studies
  • Considers the role of ecological and social environments on the evolution of communication in penguins
  • Spans the gap between the scientific community and an interested lay audience, featuring a readable style for students, professional researchers in biology, ornithologists, ethologists and penguin enthusiasts alike
  • Ideal resource for graduate seminar courses on evolution of behavior, marine ecology, polar biology and ornithology

Readership

Researchers, academics and students in animal behavior/ethology, marine ecology/biology, evolutionary biology, ornithology, and conservation biology; and for graduate seminar courses on evolution of behaviour, marine ecology, polar biology, and ornithology

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF PENGUINS           

Discovery and evolution of penguins

What is a penguin?

How many penguins and where?

Penguins as divers

Penguins as social birds

Why study the behavior of penguins?

Special penguins

Men and penguins

2 DESCRIPTION OF OPTICAL SIGNALS 

Penguin ethology is fragmentary

Agonistic and appeasement signals

Description of sexual displays

Interpretation of sexual displays

Biological significance of sexual displays

3. EXPERIMENTS ON OPTICAL SIGNALS

Why do penguins have ornaments?

Natural and sexual selection

Colors come from food

First experiments on the role of ornaments in mating

Color measurement

Breast patches of colored feathers

Ear patches of colored feathers

Male competition for female mates

Beak spots and mutual sexual selection

Body mass and condition

Climate change

Conclusions

4. DESCRIPTION OF VOCAL SIGNALS AND FIRST EXPERIMENTS

Genus Aptenodytes

Genus Pygoscelis

Genus Spheniscus

Genus Eudyptula

Genus Eudyptes

Genus Megadyptes

5. PLAYBACK EXPERIMENTS ON VOCAL SIGNALS  

Why identify the partner?

Penguins speak through recordings and playbacks

Information content of calls

Nesting penguins

Adding a bar code and two voices

Adding frequency modulation and two voices

6. THE EVOLUTION OF BREEDING STRATEGIES

Plan for incubation and brooding

Contracting breeding cycles

Breeding on sea-ice

Homosexual penguins, trios, kidnappings and adoptions

A disappearing territory

7. THE EVOLUTION OF SIGNALS FOR COMMUNICATION

A. THE EVOLUTION OF OPTICAL SIGNALS

Aggressiveness and shyness

Why the head?

Links between vocal and visual signals

Comparison between courtship displays

Origin of optical signals

B. THE EVOLUTION OF VOCAL SIGNALS

Adaptations of vocal signals

The comparative study of individual recognition

Biological significance of nuptial displays

REFERENCES

INDEX

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

CAPTIONS

SUMMARY

Details

No. of pages:
332
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2018
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128111796
Paperback ISBN:
9780128111789

About the Author

Pierre Jouventin

Pierre Jouventin is the retired Director of Research, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Montpellier and past Director of CNRS laboratory at Chizé (13 years). He has published more than 230 peer reviewed scientific articles, four books (in French); and has made more than 20 research trips to the Antarctic with nearly a decade of collective experience there.

Affiliations and Expertise

Director of Research (retired), National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Montpellier, France

F.Stephen Dobson

F. Stephen Dobson is Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University, as well as retired Director of Research, National Center for Scientific Research, Montpellier; Chevalier, Order of Academic Palms (France); and a Fulbright Scholar. He has published more than 125 peer-reviewed scientific articles and has made six research trips to the sub-Antarctic for penguin studies.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA