Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12

1st Edition - March 23, 2022

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  • Editor: Gerald Litwack
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323992237
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323992244

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Description

Vitamin B12, Volume 119 in the Vitamins and Hormones series, highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters written by an international board of authors.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in the Vitamins and Hormones series
  • Updated release includes the latest information on Vitamin B12

Readership

Undergraduates, graduates, academics, and researchers in the field of vitamins and hormones

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Former Editors
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter One: Insertion of cobalt into tetrapyrroles
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Aerobic B12 biosynthesis
  • 3: Anaerobic B12 biosynthesis
  • 4: Conclusions and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Application of bioorganometallic B12 in green organic synthesis
  • Abstract
  • 1: Vitamin B12
  • 2: B12 inspired reactions
  • 3: Electrochemical reactions catalyzed by vitamin B12 derivative
  • 4: Conclusion and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Cobamide remodeling
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Cobamide diversity and distribution
  • 3: Cobamide remodeling proteins
  • 4: Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Cubilin, the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Expression sites of cubilin, Lrp2 and Amn
  • 3: Cubilin, the intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor
  • 4: Amnionless
  • 5: Megalin/Lrp2
  • 6: The receptor complex CUBN/AMN, LRP2 and their partners (Fig. 2)
  • 7: Cubilin in the kidney
  • 8: Cubilin and receptor-mediated endocytosis
  • 9: Cubilin/Amn, Lrp2, DAB2
  • 10: Regulation of cubilin expression
  • 11: Cubilin in vitamin B12 homeostasis vitamin B12 (Fig. 3)
  • 12: Cobalamin absorption and transport (Fig. 4)
  • 13: Renal handling of vitamin B12
  • 14: IGS or juvenile megaloblastic anemia (Fig. 5)
  • 15: Cubilin in pathology
  • 16: Cubilin dysfunction in Fanconi-Bickel, Dent and Lowe syndromes
  • 17: Cubilin in diabetes, the vitamin D/micronutrient connection
  • 18: Cubilin in neural tube defects
  • 19: Cubilin as a risk variant and/or prognostic factor in cancer progression
  • 20: Cubilin in animal studies
  • 21: Breed-specific cubilin mutations in dogs
  • 22: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Membrane transport of cobalamin
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Membrane transport systems in bacteria
  • 3: Transport of cobalamin in humans
  • 4: Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Vitamin B12 photoreceptors
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction to photoreceptors and their chromophores
  • 2: Vitamin B12 structure, chemistry, photochemistry
  • 3: Vitamin B12, a precious biological cofactor
  • 4: B12-based photoreceptors
  • 5: Concluding remarks
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Photolytic properties of B12-dependent enzymes: A theoretical perspective
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Summary of experimental results
  • 3: Computational approach
  • 4: Importance of axial bonding in construction of S1 PES
  • 5: Photolytic properties of cobalamins
  • 6: Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter Eight: Antivitamins B12
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Vitamin B12 and organometallic B12-cofactors
  • 3: Antivitamins B12
  • 4: Summary and outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Nine: Vitamin B12 absorption and malabsorption
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Origin, food content and availability of vitamin B12
  • 3: Physiology of vitamin B12 absorption (Fig. 1)
  • 4: Causes of vitamin B12 malabsorption (Table 2)
  • 5: Measurements of vitamin B12 malabsorption in humans
  • References
  • Chapter Ten: Intracellular processing of vitamin B12 by MMACHC (CblC)
  • Abstract
  • 1: Overview of cellular metabolism of cobalamins
  • 2: Structure and stability of CblC
  • 3: Enzymatic activity of CblC
  • 4: Regulation of CblC expression and clinical phenotypes mimicking cblC disease
  • 5: Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter Eleven: Telomere length and vitamin B12
  • Abstract
  • 1: Telomeres
  • 2: Nutrition and telomere length
  • 3: Role of vitamin B12 in telomere homeostasis
  • 4: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Twelve: Vitamin B12 and chronic kidney disease
  • Abstract
  • 1: Vitamin B12 and chronic kidney disease: An overview
  • 2: Vitamin B12 and the homocysteine metabolic pathway in chronic kidney disease
  • 3: Vitamin B12 and chronic kidney disease in clinical practice
  • 4: Vitamin B12 and chronic kidney disease: Evidence gaps and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter Thirteen: Inherited defects of cobalamin metabolism
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Diagnosis of inborn errors affecting cobalamin metabolism
  • 3: Inborn errors affecting intestinal cobalamin absorption
  • 4: Defects affecting cobalamin transport
  • 5: Cellular cobalamin uptake
  • 6: Lysosomal membrane cobalamin transport
  • 7: The cblC disorder
  • 8: Regulation of MMACHC expression
  • 9: Partitioning cobalamin between the cytoplasm and mitochondria
  • 10: Methylmalonyl-CoA isomerization in the mitochondria
  • 11: Homocysteine remethylation
  • References
  • Chapter Fourteen: Behavioral profile of vitamin B12 deficiency: A reflection of impaired brain development, neuronal stress and altered neuroplasticity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction and background
  • 2: Neuropathology and behavioral abnormalities in human disorders
  • 3: Behavioral abnormalities in animal models
  • 4: Regions of the brain involved and the physiologic basis of behavioral alterations
  • 5: Genes and pathways involved
  • 6: Conclusions and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter Fifteen: Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Abstract
  • 1: Overview
  • 2: Basics of vitamin B12 biochemistry and physiology
  • 3: Pathophysiology and pathobiochemistry of vitamin B12 deficiency
  • 4: Prevention and treatment of B12 deficiency
  • 5: Conclusion and future directions
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter Sixteen: Metabolism-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy and B12
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: TTP-TMA
  • 3: B12 dysmetabolism and TMA-like syndrome
  • 4: The triad of TMA in B12 deficiency and dysmetabolism
  • 5: Diagnosis
  • 6: Treatment
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Seventeen: Neuropsychiatric manifestations in vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Abstract
  • 1: Vitamin B12 and neuropsychiatry
  • 2: Neurobiology of vitamin B12 related neuropsychiatric manifestations
  • 3: Neuropsychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency
  • 4: Treatment of neuropsychiatric manifestation due to vitamin B12 deficiency
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Eighteen: Vitamin B12 and predatory behavior in nematodes
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction: The ecological diversity of nematodes
  • 2: Caenorhabditis elegans—A model system approach for modern biology
  • 3: Pristionchus pacificus—A model for complex trait formation
  • 4: P. pacificus predation, cannibalism and phenotypic plasticity
  • 5: The role of vitamin B12 for the predatory behavior in P. pacificus
  • 6: The role of vitamin B12 for the development and physiology of P. pacificus and C. elegans
  • 7: Vitamins as limiting factors for nematode growth—A genomic perspective (from laboratory to natural habitats)
  • References
  • Chapter Nineteen: Determination of cobalamin and related compounds in foods
  • Abstract
  • 1: Cobalamin
  • 2: Cobalamin sources for humans
  • 3: Determination of cobalamin in foods
  • 4: Inactive cobalamins and related compounds in foods
  • 5: Conclusions and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References

Product details

  • No. of pages: 522
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 23, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323992237
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323992244

About the Editor

Gerald Litwack

Gerald Litwack
Dr. Gerald Litwack obtained M.S. and PhD degrees from the University of Wisconsin Department of Biochemistry and remained there for a brief time as a Lecturer on Enzymes. Then he entered the Biochemical Institute of the Sorbonne as a Fellow of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. He next moved to Rutgers University as an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and later as Associate Professor of biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine. After four years he moved to the Temple University School of Medicine as Professor of Biochemistry and Deputy Director of the Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, soon after, becoming the Laura H. Carnell Professor. Subsequently he was appointed chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at the Jefferson Medical College as well as Vice Dean for Research and Deputy Director of the Jefferson Cancer Institute and Director of the Institute for Apoptosis. Following the move of his family, he became a Visiting Scholar at the Department of Biological Chemistry of the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and then became the Founding Chair of the Department of Basic Sciences at the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, becoming Professor of Molecular and Cellular Medicine and Associate Director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center as his final position. During his career he was a visiting scientist at the University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley, Courtauld Institute of Biochemistry, London and the Wistar Institute. He was appointed Emeritus Professor and/or Chair at Rutgers University, Thomas Jefferson University and the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. He has published more than 300 scientific papers, authored three textbooks and edited more than sixty-five books. Currently he lives with his family and continues his authorship and editorial work in Los Angeles.

Affiliations and Expertise

Emeritus Professor and/or Chair at Rutgers University, Thomas Jefferson University and the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, USA; Toluca Lake, North Hollywood, California, USA

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