Understanding the Rheology of Concrete

Understanding the Rheology of Concrete

1st Edition - December 20, 2011

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  • Editor: N Roussel
  • eBook ISBN: 9780857095282
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081016459

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Description

Estimating, modelling, controlling and monitoring the flow of concrete is a vital part of the construction process, as the properties of concrete before it has set can have a significant impact on performance. This book provides a detailed overview of the rheological behaviour of concrete, including measurement techniques, the impact of mix design, and casting.Part one begins with two introductory chapters dealing with the rheology and rheometry of complex fluids, followed by chapters that examine specific measurement and testing techniques for concrete. The focus of part two is the impact of mix design on the rheological behaviour of concrete, looking at additives including superplasticizers and viscosity agents. Finally, chapters in part three cover topics related to casting, such as thixotropy and formwork pressure.With its distinguished editor and expert team of contributors, Understanding the rheology of concrete is an essential reference for researchers, materials specifiers, architects and designers in any section of the construction industry that makes use of concrete, and will also benefit graduate and undergraduate students of civil engineering, materials and construction.

Key Features

  • Provides a detailed overview of the rheological behaviour of concrete, including measurement techniques, casting and the impact of mix design
  • The estimating, modelling, controlling and monitoring of concrete flow is comprehensively discussed
  • Chapters examine specific measurement and testing techniques for concrete, the impact of mix design on the rheological behaviour of concrete, particle packaging and viscosity-enhancing admixtures

Readership

Civil engineers and government departments with an interest in architectural engineering, construction and materials and infrastructure; practitioners in the cement and concrete industry; advanced undergraduate and graduate students of civil engineering, materials and building engineering; researchers, materials specifiers, architects and designers in any sector of the construction industry which uses cement and concrete.

Table of Contents

  • Part I: Measuring the rheological behaviour of concrete

    Chapter 1: Introduction to the rheology of complex fluids

    Abstract:

    1.1 Solids

    1.2 Newtonian fluids

    1.3 Suspensions

    1.4 Fluids with slightly non-Newtonian character

    1.5 Yield stress fluids

    1.6 Thixotropy

    1.7 Viscoelasticity

    1.8 Conclusions

    Chapter 2: Introduction to the rheometry of complex suspensions

    Abstract:

    2.1 Rheometry

    2.2 Characterisation of simple yield stress fluids

    2.3 Characterisation of thixotropic yield stress fluids

    2.4 Advanced techniques for the study of local flow properties

    Chapter 3: Concrete rheometers

    Abstract:

    3.1 Introduction

    3.2 Rotational rheometers for concrete

    3.3 Comparison of concrete rheometers

    3.4 Modeling of concrete rheometers

    3.5 Conclusions

    3.6 Acknowledgments

    Chapter 4: From industrial testing to rheological parameters for concrete

    Abstract:

    4.1 Introduction

    4.2 The slump test family and its limits

    4.3 The LCPC BOX test

    4.4 Conclusions

    Chapter 5: The rheology of cement during setting

    Abstract:

    5.1 Hydration: chemical reactions and kinetics

    5.2 Rheology of cement pastes

    5.3 Parameters influencing mechanical efficiency of calcium hydrosilicate (CSH)

    Part II: Mix design and the rheological behaviour of concrete

    Chapter 6: Particle packing and the rheology of concrete

    Abstract:

    6.1 Introduction

    6.2 Compacity and porosity

    6.3 Packing of mono-size spheres

    6.4 Packing of identical particles

    6.5 Packing of non-identical particles

    6.6 Particle packing models

    6.7 Fibre and grain mixture

    6.8 Effect of particle size distribution on rheology

    6.9 Conclusions

    Chapter 7: Superplasticizers and the rheology of concrete

    Abstract:

    7.1 Introduction

    7.2 Chemical characteristics of superplasticizers

    7.3 Physical characteristics of superplasticizers

    7.4 Superplasticizers and rheology: microscopic behaviour

    7.5 Superplasticizers and rheology: macroscopic behaviour

    7.6 Superplasticizers and cement chemistry

    7.7 Conclusions and outlook

    Chapter 8: Viscosity-enhancing admixtures and the rheology of concrete

    Abstract:

    8.1 Introduction

    8.2 Chemical nature, classification and mode of action of viscosity-enhancing admixtures

    8.3 Effect of viscosity-enhancing admixtures on rheology of water–cement systems

    8.4 Effect of viscosity-enhancing admixtures on stability of cement-based systems

    Chapter 9: Fibre reinforcement and the rheology of concrete

    Abstract:

    9.1 Introduction

    9.2 Fibres in cementitious materials

    9.3 Fibre rheology

    9.4 Rheology of fibre concrete

    9.5 Developments in fibre concrete and rheology

    9.6 Conclusions

    9.8 Appendix: notations and symbols

    Part III: Casting and the rheological behaviour of concrete

    Chapter 10: Modelling the flow of self-compacting concrete

    Abstract:

    10.1 Introduction

    10.2 Homogeneous fluid approach (computational fluid dynamics)

    10.3 Distinct element method (DEM)

    10.4 Suspension flow

    10.5 Future trends

    10.6 Sources of further information and advice

    Chapter 11: Thixotropy: from measurement to casting of concrete

    Abstract:

    11.1 Introduction

    11.2 Origin of thixotropic behaviour

    11.3 Thixotropy in practice

    11.4 Rheological models for cement paste

    11.5 Rheological models for concrete

    Chapter 12: Understanding formwork pressure generated by fresh concrete

    Abstract:

    12.1 Introduction

    12.2 Factors affecting formwork pressure

    12.3 Relation of concrete structural behaviour at rest to lateral pressure

    12.4 Characterization of fresh concrete structure

    12.5 Modelling of lateral pressure

    12.6 Conclusions

    Chapter 13: Understanding the pumping of conventional vibrated and self-compacting concrete

    Abstract:

    13.1 Introduction

    13.2 Theoretical background

    13.3 Recent experimental research

    13.4 Pressure loss in straight sections

    13.5 Pressure loss in bends and reducers

    13.6 Conclusions

    13.7 Acknowledgement

    Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 384
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Woodhead Publishing 2011
  • Published: December 20, 2011
  • Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
  • eBook ISBN: 9780857095282
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081016459

About the Editor

N Roussel

Dr Nicolas Roussel is a researcher at the Institut Français des Sciences et Technologies des Transport, de l’Aménagement et des Réseaux (IFSTTAR), France. He is well-known for his research on the rheology of concrete.

Affiliations and Expertise

LCPC, France

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