Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Handbook - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128022382, 9780128025369

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Handbook

1st Edition

Evaluation and Development

Authors: Y Ma Stephen Holditch
eBook ISBN: 9780128025369
Paperback ISBN: 9780128022382
Imprint: Gulf Professional Publishing
Published Date: 22nd October 2015
Page Count: 550
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Description

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Handbook: Evaluation and Development is a must-have, helpful handbook that brings a wealth of information to engineers and geoscientists. Bridging between subsurface and production, the handbook provides engineers and geoscientists with effective methodology to better define resources and reservoirs. Better reservoir knowledge and innovative technologies are making unconventional resources economically possible, and multidisciplinary approaches in evaluating these resources are critical to successful development. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Handbook takes this approach, covering a wide range of topics for developing these resources including exploration, evaluation, drilling, completion, and production. Topics include theory, methodology, and case histories and will help to improve the understanding,integrated evaluation, and effective development of unconventional resources.

Key Features

  • Presents methods for a full development cycle of unconventional resources, from exploration through production
  • Explores multidisciplinary integrations for evaluation and development of unconventional resources and covers a broad range of reservoir characterization methods and development scenarios
  • Delivers balanced information with multiple contributors from both academia and industry
  • Provides case histories involving geological analysis, geomechanical analysis, reservoir modeling, hydraulic fracturing treatment, microseismic monitoring, well performance and refracturing for development of unconventional reservoirs

Readership

(Primary): Petroleum Engineers, Geologists, Reservoir Engineers, Drilling Engineers, Natural Gas Engineers, Well Designers, Well Managers, Petrophysicists, Production Engineers, and Completion Engineers; (Secondary): Graduate level Petroleum Engineering Students

Table of Contents

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  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • Part 1. General Topics
    • Chapter 1. Unconventional Resources from Exploration to Production
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Exploration and Early Appraisal
      • 1.3. Evaluation
      • 1.4. Drilling
      • 1.5. Completion and Stimulation
      • 1.6. Production
      • 1.7. Unconventional Globalization
      • 1.8. Conclusions
      • List of Abbreviations
      • Units
    • Chapter 2. World Recoverable Unconventional Gas Resources Assessment
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Methodology
      • 2.3. Global Unconventional Gas Original Gas-in-Place Assessment
      • 2.4. Technically Recoverable Resources Recovery Factor
      • 2.5. Global Recoverable Unconventional Gas Resource Evaluation
      • 2.6. Discussion
      • 2.7. Conclusion
      • Nomenclature
    • Chapter 3. Geochemistry Applied to Evaluation of Unconventional Resources
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Discussion
      • 3.3. Conclusions
      • 3.4. Appendix: Kerogen Types and Preparation
    • Chapter 4. Pore-Scale Characterization of Gas Flow Properties in Shale by Digital Core Analysis
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Gas Shale Characterization by DCA
      • 4.3. Gas Flow Behaviors in Shale Pores and Pore-Network Models
      • 4.4. Surface Adsorption/Desorption and an Effective Multilayer Adsorption Model
      • 4.5. Aggregated Effect on the Predicted Gas Permeability
      • 4.6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 5. Wireline Log Signatures of Organic Matter and Lithofacies Classifications for Shale and Tight Carbonate Reservoirs
      • 5.1. Introduction and Overview
      • 5.2. Review of Lithofacies Classification in Conventional Formation Evaluation
      • 5.3. Tight Carbonate Reservoirs without Presence of Organic Shale
      • 5.4. Shale Reservoirs with the Presence of Carbonate Lithofacies and without Siliceous Lithofacies
      • 5.5. Formations with a Mixture of Clayey, Siliceous, Carbonate and Organic Lithofacies
      • 5.6. Multilevel Clustering of Lithofacies and Rock Types
      • 5.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 6. The Role of Pore Proximity in Governing Fluid PVT Behavior and Produced Fluids Composition in Liquids-Rich Shale Reservoirs
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Pore Confinement Effects on Fluid Properties
      • 6.3. Multicomponent Fluid Transport in Nanopores
      • 6.4. Implications of Pore Proximity on Well Drainage Areas and Productivity
      • 6.5. Modifications to Existing Equations-of-State
      • 6.6. Impact to Producers
      • 6.7. Summary and Conclusions
    • Chapter 7. Geomechanics for Unconventional Reservoirs
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Mechanical Earth Model
      • 7.3. Drilling Applications for Unconventional Reservoirs
      • 7.4. Completion Applications for Unconventional Reservoirs
      • 7.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 8. Hydraulic Fracture Treatment, Optimization, and Production Modeling
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Fracture Fluid and Proppant Selections
      • 8.3. Optimizing Fracture Design and Completion Strategies
      • 8.4. Production Modeling
      • 8.5. Economic and Operational Considerations
      • 8.6. Conclusion and Discussions
      • Nomenclature
    • Chapter 9. The Application of Microseismic Monitoring in Unconventional Reservoirs
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Microseismic Monitoring Basics
      • 9.3. Microseismic Application to Unconventional Resource Development
      • 9.4. Conclusions
      • Appendix
    • Chapter 10. Impact of Preexisting Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Simulation
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Hydraulic Fracture and Natural Fracture Interaction
      • 10.3. Modeling of Complex Fracture Network
      • 10.4. Impact of Natural Fractures on Induced Fracture Network
      • 10.5. Impact of Uncertainty of DFN on HFN Simulation
      • 10.6. Conclusion
  • Part 2. Special Topics
    • Chapter 11. Effective Core Sampling for Improved Calibration of Logs and Seismic Data
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Pattern Recognition in Log Data
      • 11.3. Sample Selection for Calibration
      • 11.4. Case Studies
      • 11.5. Discussion
      • 11.6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 12. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Design and Well Performance Analysis
      • 12.1. Overview of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Modeling
      • 12.2. Well Performance Analysis
      • 12.3. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Design Workflow
      • 12.4. Conclusion
      • Nomenclature
    • Chapter 13. Impact of Geomechanical Properties on Completion in Developing Tight Reservoirs
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Overview of Hydraulic Fracture and Production Modeling
      • 13.3. Impact of Geomechanical Properties on Well Completions
      • 13.4. Impact of Geomechanical Properties on Asset Development
      • 13.5. Discussion: Geomechanical Properties, Reservoir Quality, and Completion Strategy
      • 13.6. Conclusions
    • Chapter 14. Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Part 1: Overview and Lithofacies
      • 14.1. Introduction and Overview
      • 14.2. Lithofacies and Rock Typing
      • 14.3. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Lithofacies in Tight Sandstone Formations
      • 14.4. Conclusion
    • Chapter 15. Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Part 2: Petrophysical Analysis and Reservoir Modeling
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Common Issues in Petrophysical Analysis of Tight Gas Sandstones
      • 15.3. Petrophysical Analysis for Reservoir Properties
      • 15.4. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Reservoir Properties
      • 15.5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 16. Granite Wash Tight Gas Reservoir
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Basin Evolution
      • 16.3. Source Rock Evaluation
      • 16.4. Trap and Seal
      • 16.5. Stratigraphy and Depositional Facies
      • 16.6. Reservoir Architecture and Properties
      • 16.7. Resources and Fluid Properties
      • 16.8. Production History
      • 16.9. Horizontal Wells
      • 16.10. Hydraulic Fracturing
      • 16.11. Multilateral Well
      • 16.12. Conclusions
    • Chapter 17. Coalbed Methane Evaluation and Development: An Example from Qinshui Basin in China
      • 17.1. Introduction and Overview
      • 17.2. Basin Evolution and Gas Generation
      • 17.3. CBM Reservoir Characterization
      • 17.4. CBM Development Challenges
      • 17.5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 18. Monitoring and Predicting Steam Chamber Development in a Bitumen Field
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Mapping Steam
      • 18.3. Reservoir Characterization Using a Probabilistic Neural Network
      • 18.4. Conclusion
      • List of Abbreviations
    • Chapter 19. Glossary for Unconventional Oil and Gas Resource Evaluation and Development
      • 19.1. Reservoir-Related Terminology
      • 19.2. Rock Mechanics-Related Terminology
      • 19.3. Drilling and Completion-Related Terminology
      • 19.4. Miscellaneous Terminology
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
550
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Gulf Professional Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Gulf Professional Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780128025369
Paperback ISBN:
9780128022382

About the Author

Y Ma

Dr. Zee Ma is currently a Scientific Advisor in Geosciences and Mathematical Modeling for Schlumberger, specializing in integrated reservoir modeling and hydrocarbon resource evaluation for both conventional and unconventional plays. Prior to joining Schlumberger, he worked for several other major oil companies and service providers for over 28 years in Europe and the US, including Total and ExxonMobil, and served many years as leader for Reservoir Characterization, Static and Dynamic Reservoir Modeling Special Interest Groups. Ma has provided technical consultancy and training for many oil companies and institutions around the world, and has worked on a number of large worldwide projects, including North America’s unconventional oil and gas fields, reservoirs of various depositional environments in West Africa, Gulf of Mexico, Mideast, Canada, South America, and North Sea. Ma has received numerous awards, including the Schlumberger Gold Award and Chairman's Award, and Best Paper from Mathematical Geosciences. He has published numerous papers in geophysics, geology, petrophysics, geostatistics, petroleum engineering, economics, and applied mathematics, and served as the lead Editor of the AAPG Memoir 96. Ma earned four degrees - a Ph.D. in Mathematical Geology, Geostatistics, and Remote Sensing from the Institute National Polytechnique de Lorraine (France), a M.Sc. in Geostatistics from the Ecole National Superior de Mine de Paris (now ParisTech), a M.Sc. in Geologic Engineering from University of Lorraine in France, and a B.Sc. in Geology from the China University of Geosciences.

Affiliations and Expertise

Scientific Advisor in Geomechanics and Mathematical Modeling, Schlumberger

Stephen Holditch

Stephen Holditch is currently a retired Professor Emeritus for the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University with a 39-year long career in the oil and gas industry. Prior to retirement, he was the Director of the Texas A&M Energy Institute from 2011-2013 and was the Head of the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering at A&M from 2004-2012. Prior to his contributions in academia, he formed his own consulting firm, S.A. Holditch and Associates, specializing in tight gas, shale, and coalbed methane projects. Schlumberger purchased the company in 1997, and Holditch was named a Schlumberger Fellow from 1999 to 2004. Stephen served as SPE President from 2001-2003 and a member of the Board of Directors for SPE for several years. Stephen earned his Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees all in Petroleum Engineering and all from Texas A&M University. He has received many awards throughout his career, including election into the National Academy of Engineering, SPE and AIME Honorary Memberships, and was recently named a Distinguished Alumnus from A&M in 2014. Stephen is associated with many organizations, including SPE, AAPG, SPWLA, and he is a registered professional engineer in the state of Texas. He has also written numerous papers, including one of the first editorial pieces in Elsevier's Journal of Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University