Description

Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphism (UHPM) is a fast growing discipline that was established 25 years ago after discoveries of high pressure minerals, coesite and diamonds. The current explosion of research on UHMP terranes reflects their significance for understanding large scale mantle dynamics, major elements of plate tectonics such as continental collisions, deep subduction and exhumation, mountains building, geochemical recycling 'from surface to the core', and a deep storage of light elements participating in green-house effects in the atmosphere. This book provides insights into the formation of diamond and coesite at very high pressures and explores new ideas regarding the tectonic setting of this style of metamorphism.

Key Features

  • Important, authoritative and comprehensive one-stop resource for the growing ultrahigh pressure metamorphism UHPM research community
  • A forward-looking approach founded upon a detailed historical perspective on UHPM presents the trends in discovery, methodology and theory over the last 25 years, allowing readers to gain a clear understanding of the current trends and the approaches that will shape the science in the future
  • A highly diverse set of articles, covering a wide range of methods and sub-disciplines

Readership

Geologists and geological survey, mining and resources planning workers

 

Table of Contents

Preface

List of Contributors

Reviewers

1. Frontiers of Ultrahigh-Pressure Metamorphism

1.1. Introduction

1.2. Main Achievements: 25 Years On

1.3. Further Directions

1.4. Looking Forward

2. Diamond–Lonsdaleite–Graphite Relations Examined by Raman Mapping of Carbon Microinclusions inside Zircon at Kumdy Kol, Kokchetav, Kazakhstan

2.1. Introduction

2.2. Geological Setting

2.3. Analytical Procedures

2.4. Results

2.5. Discussion

2.6. Conclusions

3. Diamond and Other Possible Ultradeep Evidence Discovered in the Orogenic Spinel-Garnet Peridotite from the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

3.1. Introduction

3.2. Geological Settings and Some Backgrounds

3.3. Petrography and Mineral Chemistry

3.4. Experimental

3.5. Varying Crystallinity of Graphite

3.6. Diamond

3.7. Crystal Orientation Relationship Between Clinopyroxene Lamellae and Host Chromian Spinel

3.8. Discussion

3.9. Conclusions

4. Diamond Formation from Amorphous Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids

4.1. Introduction

4.2. Materials and Methods

4.3. Results

4.4. Discussion

5. Origin of High-Pressure Disordered Metastable Phases (Lonsdaleite and Incipiently Amorphized Quartz) in Metamorphic Rocks

5.1. Introduction

5.2. Quartz Incipiently Amorphized Under Pressure

5.3. Lonsdaleite

5.4. Discussion

5.5. Conclusion

6. Origin and Metamorphic Evolution of Garnet Clinopyroxenite from the Sulu UHP Terrane, China

6.1. Introduction

6.2. Geological Outline

6.3. Sample Description

6.4. Analytical Methods

6.5. Chemical Composition of Whole Rock

6.6. Mineral Composition

6.7. Mineral Lamellae in C

Details

No. of pages:
696
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2011
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780123851451
Print ISBN:
9780123851444
Print ISBN:
9780323165044

About the editors

Larissa Dobrzhinetskaya

Affiliations and Expertise

University of California, Riverside, CA, USA

Shah Wali Faryad

Affiliations and Expertise

Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Simon Wallis

Affiliations and Expertise

Nagoya University, Japan

Simon Cuthbert

Affiliations and Expertise

University of the West of Scotland, Glasgow, UK

Reviews

Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphism (UHPM) is a fast growing discipline that was established 25 years ago after discoveries of high pressure minerals, coesite and diamonds. The current explosion of research on UHMP terranes reflects their significance for understanding large scale mantle dynamics, major elements of plate tectonics such as continental collisions, deep subduction and exhumation, mountains building, geochemical recycling 'from surface to the core', and a deep storage of light elements participating in green-house effects in the atmosphere. This book provides insights into the formation of diamond and coesite at very high pressures and explores new ideas regarding the tectonic setting of this style of metamorphism.