Translational Autoimmunity

Translational Autoimmunity

Etiology of Autoimmune Diseases

1st Edition - October 22, 2021

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  • Editor: Nima Rezaei
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128225646
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128232774

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Description

Translational Autoimmunity: Etiology of Autoimmune Diseases is the first volume of the Translational Immunology book series. To attain its purpose as a detailed translational step to tackle autoimmunity, this volume sufficiently addresses basic questions on how the immune system is designed to distinguish self from nonself. It discusses the known mechanisms that lead to the maintenance of self-tolerance, presents potential triggers and malfunctions that impede normal immune processes, and demonstrates how the immune system induces an autoreactive state that results in the recognition of self-antigens seen in autoimmune conditions.

Key Features

  • Includes coverage of basic immunology, the clinical aspects of autoimmunity, and translational immunology studies in autoimmunity
  • Presents key concepts supported by a systematic appraisal of the most recent evidence
  • Assists students at all the academic levels while also being applicable to scientists who work with autoimmunity
  • Designed for learning, teaching, review, testing, practice and research

Readership

Clinical immunologists; Endocrinologists; Microbiologists; Neurologists; Oncologists; Rheumatologists. Clinicians, research scientists, and industry partners

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Series editor biography
  • Acknowledgment
  • Abbreviations
  • Chapter 1: Introduction on translational autoimmunity: From bench to bedside
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Autoimmune disorders
  • 3: Pathogenesis and mechanisms of autoimmune diseases
  • 4: Predisposing factors
  • 5: Role of genetics
  • 6: Obstacles in treatment
  • 7: Diagnostic tools
  • 8: Role of innate immunity
  • 9: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Autophagy in autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: An overview of autophagy
  • 3: Autophagy in immunity
  • 4: Autophagy in autoimmune diseases
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Immunometabolism and autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Immunometabolism in homeostasis
  • 3: Immunometabolism in autoimmunity
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: T cell recognition of neoepitopes in autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The mystery of lost tolerance in autoimmunity
  • 3: Determinant spreading in autoimmune disease
  • 4: Neoepitopes as a challenge to immune tolerance
  • 5: T cell recognition of citrullinated neoepitopes in rheumatoid arthritis
  • 6: T cell recognition of deamidated neoepitopes in CD
  • 7: T cell recognition of neo-antigens in T1D
  • 8: Prospects for diagnostic detection of neoepitope specific T cell responses
  • 9: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Role of Th1 and Th2 in autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Th1 and Th2 generation
  • 3: Th1 and Th2 response in health
  • 4: Breakdown of tolerance: Autoimmunity and allergy
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Role of Th17 cell in tissue inflammation and organ-specific autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Differentiation of IL-17-producing Th17 cells
  • 3: Amplification of Th17 cells
  • 4: Stabilization of Th17 cells
  • 5: Transcriptional regulation of Th17 cells
  • 6: Regulators of Th17 cells
  • 7: Small molecules inhibitor of Th17 cells
  • 8: Role of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases
  • 9: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Peptide editing and its modulation in CD4+ T cell tolerance to self
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Cellular adaptive immunity in health and disease
  • 3: Tolerance mechanisms: training lymphocytes for a proper self and non-self recognition
  • 4: Peptide editing in the targets of organ-specific autoimmune diseases
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Innate lymphoid cells in autoimmune diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: ILCs as crucial components of the mammalian immune system
  • 3: ILCs in ADs
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Autoimmune diseases and the role of Toll-like receptor-7 and -9 signaling cascades
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Toll-like receptors
  • 3: Autoimmune disorders with a role for TLR7 or TLR9
  • 4: Manipulation of TLR7 and TLR9-induced signaling
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: The role of type III interferons in systemic autoimmune diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The type III interferon family
  • 3: Production of type III interferons
  • 4: Response of target cells to type III interferons
  • 5: Potential association between interferons and autoimmunity
  • 6: Type III interferons in systemic lupus erythematosus
  • 7: Type III interferons in Sjögren syndrome
  • 8: Type III interferons in rheumatoid arthritis
  • 9: Type III interferons in antiphospholipid syndrome
  • 10: Type III interferons in systemic sclerosis
  • 11: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Regulation of immunological tolerance and human autoimmunity by NF-κB
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Immunological tolerance
  • 3: Monogenic NF-κB defects and human autoimmunity
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Micro RNA, circular RNA, neutrophils, and myeloperoxydases in autoimmune diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Micro ribonucleic acids (MicroRNAs)
  • 3: Circular RNAs
  • 4: Neutrophils
  • 5: Myeloperoxidase in autoimmune diseases
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Human leukocyte antigen and autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: HLA genetic organization and protein structure
  • 3: Autoimmune HLA disease association
  • 4: Mechanisms involved in HLA-mediated autoimmune pathology
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14: HLA-G-mediated immunological tolerance and autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Genetic variation of HLA-G gene
  • 3: Molecular structure of HLA-G
  • 4: HLA-G expression regulation
  • 5: HLA-G and receptor signaling pathways
  • 6: HLA-G and autoimmunity
  • 7: Implication of HLA-G-mediated immune tolerance in autoimmunity
  • 8: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: The immune system and the microbiota: The two sides of mucosal tolerance
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Microbiota
  • 3: Mucosal immune system
  • 4: Mucosal tolerance
  • 5: Mechanisms of mucosal tolerance toward commensal bacteria
  • 6: Tolerance breaking at the mucous membranes and autoimmune diseases
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Role of free radicals in autoimmune diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Pathophysiology of free radicals
  • 3: Inflammation and autoimmune diseases
  • 4: Rheumatoid arthritis
  • 5: Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Immunological tolerance and autoimmunity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Central tolerance of T cells and autoimmunity
  • 3: Peripheral T cell tolerance and autoimmunity
  • 4: Central B cell tolerance and autoimmunity
  • 5: Peripheral B cell tolerance and autoimmunity
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Construction of bioscore for detection of self-tolerance failure: From analysis of silicosis cases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Effects of silica particles on human immune cells
  • 3: Generating a bioscore/autoimmune score to detect early dysregulation of autoimmunity
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 390
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: October 22, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128225646
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128232774

About the Editor

Nima Rezaei

Nima Rezaei is professor of clinical immunology at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), vice dean of international affairs in the School of Medicine, and deputy president of Research Center for Immunodeficiencies. He received his PhD in clinical immunology and human genetics from the University of Sheffield in the UK after graduation in medicine (MD) from TUMS. He has written hundreds of papers and edited for leading book series and is the founding president of Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), where he is directing several interest groups such the Network of Immunity in Infection, Malignancy and Autoimmunity (NIIMA) and the Cancer Immunology Project (CIP). He is the Deputy President of the Research Center for Immunodeficiencies. He has presented more than 400 lectures/ posters in congresses and published more than 6700 articles and several books, and major reference works.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Clinical Immunology, Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center and Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Network of Immunity in Infection, Malignancy and Autoimmunity (NIIMA), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran

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