Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780857097125, 9780857097163

Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers

2nd Edition

Editors: Aldo R Boccaccini P.X. Ma
eBook ISBN: 9780857097163
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857097125
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 2nd June 2014
Page Count: 728
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Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part I: General issues: materials
    • 1. Ceramic biomaterials for tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Characteristics of ceramics
      • 1.3 Microstructure of ceramics
      • 1.4 Properties of ceramics
      • 1.5 Processing of ceramics
      • 1.6 Conclusions and future trends
      • 1.7 References
    • 2. Polymeric biomaterials for tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering
      • 2.3 Polymeric scaffolds with controlled release capacity
      • 2.4 Conclusions and future trends
      • 2.5 Acknowledgements
      • 2.6 References
    • 3. Bioactive ceramics and glasses for tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Scaffolds for tissue engineering
      • 3.3 Bioactive ceramics
      • 3.4 Properties of bioactive ceramics
      • 3.5 Tissue engineering applications of bioactive ceramics
      • 3.6 Bioactive glasses
      • 3.7 Preparation and properties of bioactive glasses
      • 3.8 Bioactive glasses in tissue engineering
      • 3.9 Bioactive glass–ceramics
      • 3.10 Bioactive composites
      • 3.11 Conclusions and future trends
      • 3.12 References
    • 4. Biodegradable and bioactive polymer/inorganic phase nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering (BTE)
      • Abstract:
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Composite materials for bone tissue engineering
      • 4.3 Nanocomposites for tissue engineering
      • 4.4 Electrospinning
      • 4.5 Electrospun composite scaffolds based on natural polymers
      • 4.6 Electrospun composite scaffolds based on synthetic polymers
      • 4.7 Natural and synthetic polymer combinations
      • 4.8 Conclusions and future trends
      • 4.9 Acknowledgement
      • 4.10 References
  • Part II: General issues: processing, characterisation and modelling
    • 5. Nanoscale design in biomineralization for developing new biomaterials for bone tissue engineering (BTE)
      • Abstract:
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Materials and techniques for nanoscale design
      • 5.3 Nanoparticles
      • 5.4 Nanofibers and nanotubes
      • 5.5 Nanopatterns
      • 5.6 Drug-delivery systems
      • 5.7 Nanocomposites
      • 5.8 Nanogels and injectable systems
      • 5.9 Surface functionalization and templating
      • 5.10 Conclusions and future trends
      • 5.11 Acknowledgement
      • 5.12 References
    • 6. Characterisation of cells on biomaterial surfaces and tissue-engineered constructs using microscopy techniques
      • Abstract:
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 General considerations and experimental design
      • 6.3 Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)
      • 6.4 Combining techniques
      • 6.5 Future trends
      • 6.6 Sources of further information and advice
      • Websites
      • 6.7 References
    • 7. Materials for perfusion bioreactors used in tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 The need for large volume cell culturing
      • 7.3 Bioreactors for tissue engineering
      • 7.4 The future of large bioreactors through in vitro mimicry of the stem cell niche
      • 7.5 Conclusions and future trends
      • 7.6 Acknowledgements
      • 7.7 References
    • 8. Transplantation of engineered cells and tissues
      • Abstract:
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 The immune response to tissue engineered products
      • 8.3 Generality of the resistance of tissue engineered products to immune rejection
      • 8.4 Testing and regulatory consequences
      • 8.5 Comparison between autologous and allogeneic tissue engineering
      • 8.6 Conclusions and future trends
      • 8.7 Sources of further information and advice
      • 8.8 Acknowledgements
      • 8.9 References
    • 9. Carrier systems and biosensors for biomedical applications
      • Abstract:
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Carrier systems
      • 9.3 Commercial systems
      • 9.4 Biosensors
      • 9.5 Continuous monitoring
      • 9.6 Immunosensors for point-of-care testing
      • 9.7 Future trends
      • 9.8 Conclusions
      • 9.9 References
    • 10. From images to mathematical models: intravoxel micromechanics for ceramics and polymers
      • Abstract:
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Conversion of voxel-specific computed tomography (CT) data into material composition (volume fractions)
      • 10.3 Conversion of material composition into voxel-specific elastic properties
      • 10.4 Intravoxel-micromechanics-enhanced finite element simulations
      • 10.5 Conclusions and future trends
      • 10.6 Acknowledgements
      • 10.7 References and further reading
      • 10.8 Appendix: nomenclature
  • Part III: Tissue and organ regeneration
    • 11. Engineering of tissues and organs
      • Abstract:
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Native cells
      • 11.3 Alternate cell sources: stem cells for use in tissue engineering
      • 11.4 Biomaterials
      • 11.5 Cellular therapies
      • 11.6 Tissue engineering of specific structures
      • 11.7 Vascularization of engineered tissues
      • 11.8 Conclusions and future trends
      • 11.9 References
    • 12. Myocardial tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Cell sources
      • 12.3 Biomaterials-based strategies in myocardial tissue engineering (MTE)
      • 12.4 Potential scaffolding biomaterials
      • 12.5 Conclusions and future trends
      • 12.6 References and further reading
    • 13. Kidney tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Limitations of hemodialysis (HD) as renal replacement therapy
      • 13.3 Concept and configuration of bioartificial kidneys
      • 13.4 Early developments in bioartificial kidney design
      • 13.5 Present developments in bioartificial tubule devices
      • 13.6 Bioartificial tubule devices in the treatment of acute kidney injuries with endotoxinaemia
      • 13.7 Development of bioartificial renal tubule devices for long-term treatment
      • 13.8 Development of a bioartificial glomerulus
      • 13.9 Future trends
      • 13.10 References
    • 14. Bladder tissue regeneration
      • Abstract:
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Concepts, strategies and biomaterials for bladder reconstruction and tissue engineering
      • 14.3 Review of past and current strategies in bladder reconstruction
      • 14.4 Cell conditioning in an external bioreactor
      • 14.5 Future trends
      • 14.6 Conclusions
      • 14.7 References
    • 15. Peripheral nerve tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 15.1 Introduction to the nervous system
      • 15.2 Peripheral nerve injury and regeneration
      • 15.3 Peripheral nerve repair
      • 15.4 Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs)
      • 15.5 Further structural optimisation of NGCs
      • 15.6 Cultured cells for nerve repair
      • 15.7 Conclusions
      • 15.8 References
    • 16. Tissue engineering of the small intestine
      • Abstract:
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Approaches to tissue engineering of the small intestine
      • 16.3 Scaffold selection
      • 16.4 Guided tissue regeneration of the small intestine
      • 16.5 Cell seeding sources
      • 16.6 Combining cells and scaffolds
      • 16.7 Growth factors
      • 16.8 Conclusions and future trends
      • 16.9 References
    • 17. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Clinical and scientific applications
      • 17.3 Characteristics of skeletal muscle
      • 17.4 Potential scaffolds for skeletal muscle tissue engineering
      • 17.5 Smart matrices
      • 17.6 Electrospun scaffolds in vivo/arteriovenous (AV)-loop models in the rat
      • 17.7 Conclusions and future trends
      • 17.8 References
    • 18. Cartilage tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Strategies for cartilage repair
      • 18.3 The structure of articular cartilage
      • 18.4 Biomaterials for articular cartilage replacement therapy
      • 18.5 Conclusions
      • 18.6 Future trends
      • 18.7 Acknowledgement
      • 18.8 References
    • 19. Liver tissue engineering
      • Abstract:
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Liver diseases and current treatments
      • 19.3 In vitro conditions for hepatocytes
      • 19.4 In vitro analysis of hepatocyte function
      • 19.5 Potential applications of engineered liver tissue
      • 19.6 Conclusions and future trends
      • 19.7 References
    • 20. Collagen-based tubular constructs for tissue engineering applications
      • Abstract:
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Current approaches to vascular tissue replacement and regeneration
      • 20.3 Current approaches to airway tissue replacement, regeneration, and modelling
      • 20.4 Type I collagen: the construction material
      • 20.5 Cells: the construction workers
      • 20.6 Culture conditions: the construction tools
      • 20.7 Conclusions and future trends
      • 20.8 References
    • 21. Bioceramic nanoparticles for tissue engineering and drug delivery
      • Abstract:
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Ceramic nanoparticles
      • 21.3 Nanoparticles for drug delivery
      • 21.4 Nanoparticles for gene transfer (transfection)
      • 21.5 Nanoparticles for gene silencing
      • 21.6 Fluorescent nanoparticles for imaging
      • 21.7 Nanoparticles in tissue engineering
      • 21.8 Conclusions and future trends
      • 21.9 References
    • 22. Multifunctional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and in situ drug delivery
      • Abstract:
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Scaffolds as drug carriers
      • 22.3 Controlled release of therapeutic drugs for bone tissue engineering
      • 22.4 Conclusions and future trends
      • 22.5 References and further reading
  • Index

Description

The second edition of Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers comprehensively reviews the latest advances in this area rapidly evolving area of biomaterials science.

Part one considers the biomaterials used for tissue engineering. It introduces the properties and processing of bioactive ceramics and glasses, as well as polymeric biomaterials, particularly biodegradable polymer phase nanocomposites. Part two reviews the advances in techniques for processing, characterization, and modeling of materials. The topics covered range from nanoscale design in biomineralization strategies for bone tissue engineering to microscopy techniques for characterizing cells to materials for perfusion bioreactors. Further, carrier systems and biosensors in biomedical applications are considered. Finally, part three looks at the specific types of tissue and organ regeneration, with chapters concerning kidney, bladder, peripheral nerve, small intestine, skeletal muscle, cartilage, liver, and myocardial tissue engineering. Important developments in collagen-based tubular constructs, bioceramic nanoparticles, and multifunctional scaffolds for tissue engineering and drug delivery are also explained.

Tissue Engineering Using Ceramics and Polymers is a valuable reference tool for both academic researchers and scientists involved in biomaterials or tissue engineering, including the areas of bone and soft-tissue reconstruction and repair, and organ regeneration.

Key Features

  • Second edition comprehensively examines the latest advances in ceramic and polymers in tissue engineering
  • Provides readers with general information on polymers and ceramics and looks at the processing, characterization, and modeling
  • Reviews the latest research and advances in tissue and organ regeneration using ceramics and polymers

Details

No. of pages:
728
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857097163
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857097125

About the Editors

Aldo R Boccaccini Editor

Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini is Professor of Biomaterials and Head of the Institute of Biomaterials at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

P.X. Ma Editor

Professor Peter X. Ma is the Richard H Kingery Endowed Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan, USA

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Michigan, USA