Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

Facts, Theories, and Clinical Implications

1st Edition - March 12, 2022

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  • Author: Jos J. Eggermont
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323919128
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323985260

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Description

Tinnitus and Hyperacusis: Facts, Theories, and Clinical Implications provides an overview on this burgeoning field, covering the underlying mechanisms and potential treatments for these disorders. The book begins with an overview of the etiology and genetics behind tinnitus and hyperacusis. The author then proposes two parallel neural pathways underlying these conditions and provides a basis for connecting animal to human research. Neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and immediate early genes are discussed, along with a detailed comparison of about a dozen models aimed at explaining tinnitus and hyperacusis, including the neurophysiological model, the neural synchrony model and the cortical map reorganization and filling-in model. Potential treatments of tinnitus and hyperacusis, from behavioral to non-invasive neuromodulation are also discussed. This book is written for clinical neuroscientists, audiologists, neuro-otologists, neurologists and clinical psychologists.

Key Features

  • Describes the etiology and genetics of tinnitus and hyperacusis
  • Compares animal data and human findings in activity of the limbic system
  • Discusses ten models of tinnitus and hyperacusis
  • Presents an overview of treatments for behavioral to non-invasive neuromodulation

Readership

Clinical Neuroscientists, Audiologists, Neuro-otologists; Neurologists, Clinical Psychologists. Anyone interested in the Neural mechanisms, Diagnosis and Treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Academics and professionals dealing with auditory and neurological disorders involving hyperacusis and tinnitus

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Preface
  • Abbreviations in the main text
  • Chapter 1. Tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Acquired hearing loss
  • 1.3. Loudness recruitment
  • 1.4. Noise-induced temporary threshold shifts
  • 1.5. Noise exposure not causing PTS or TTS
  • 1.6. Tinnitus pitch, loudness, and hearing loss
  • 1.7. Summary
  • Chapter 2. Epidemiology, etiology, and genetics
  • 2.1. Prevalence of tinnitus and hyperacusis
  • 2.2. Etiology
  • 2.3. Genetics
  • 2.4. Summary
  • Chapter 3. Physiological markers of tinnitus and hyperacusis
  • 3.1. Spontaneous neural activity. Noise or information carrier?
  • 3.2. Spike-firing synchrony
  • 3.3. Brain rhythms
  • 3.4. Thalamocortical oscillations
  • 3.5. Spike-LFP and EEG/MEG correlation and networks in human cortex
  • 3.6. Auditory-evoked potentials
  • 3.7. Summary
  • Chapter 4. Substrates of tinnitus and hyperacusis in the animal auditory system
  • 4.1. Spontaneous firing activity in general
  • 4.2. Effects of salicylate and noise exposure in auditory pathways
  • 4.3. Cell types and afferent pathways
  • 4.4. Hyperacusis
  • 4.5. Neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and immediate early genes
  • 4.6. Summary
  • Chapter 5. Evoked potentials and neuroimaging in humans with tinnitus
  • 5.1. Auditory-evoked potentials and tinnitus
  • 5.2. Brain structure, rhythms, and networks
  • 5.3. Brain networks in humans with tinnitus
  • 5.4. Summary
  • Chapter 6. Tinnitus and hyperacusis: The nonclassical auditory system
  • 6.1. Overview of brain areas activated by sound compared to resting state
  • 6.2. The amygdala
  • 6.3. The hippocampus
  • 6.4. Cingulate cortex
  • 6.5. Human tinnitus and the limbic system
  • 6.6. Comparison of animal and human data
  • 6.7. Cerebellum
  • 6.8. Summary
  • Chapter 7. Tinnitus and the nonauditory brain
  • 7.1. The nonauditory brain in cognition and perception
  • 7.2. Tinnitus-related changes in structural and functional MRI networks
  • 7.3. EEG/MEG-based network connectivity changes in tinnitus
  • 7.4. Comparing functional connectivity changes in tinnitus and hearing loss
  • 7.5. Connectivity changes of the nucleus accumbens
  • 7.6. Transitions from no-tinnitus to tinnitus, and from acute to chronic tinnitus
  • 7.7. Summary
  • Chapter 8. Loudness recruitment and hyperacusis: the central-gain model
  • 8.1. Hyperacusis and related symptoms
  • 8.2. Hyperacusis in common disorders
  • 8.3. Loudness recruitment and increased central gain
  • 8.4. Central gain and hyperacusis
  • 8.5. Human studies of hyperacusis
  • 8.6. Mechanisms of hyperacusis
  • 8.7. Summary
  • Chapter 9. Bottom-up tinnitus models
  • 9.1. The neural synchrony model
  • 9.2. The cortical map reorganization and filling-in models
  • 9.3. The maladaptive plasticity model
  • 9.4. The central gain enhancement model and tinnitus
  • 9.5. The insufficient central compensation model
  • 9.6. Summary
  • Chapter 10. Top-down tinnitus models
  • 10.1. The Jastreboff model
  • 10.2. The thalamocortical dysrhythmia/global workspace model
  • 10.3. Noise cancellation by frontostriatal gating
  • 10.4. The increased central noise model
  • 10.5. Interacting neural network models
  • 10.6. The sensory predictive coding or Bayesian inference model
  • 10.7. Summary
  • Chapter 11. Behavioral and pharmaceutical therapy
  • 11.1. Tinnitus retraining therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy
  • 11.2. Sound therapy and/or music therapy
  • 11.3. Cross-modal stimulation
  • 11.4. Effects of pharmaceutical intervention
  • 11.5. Diet and tinnitus
  • 11.6. Summary
  • Chapter 12. Neurofeedback and neuromodulation: hearing aids, cochlear implants, and transcranial stimulation
  • 12.1. Neurofeedback
  • 12.2. Neuromodulation with hearing aids and cochlear implants
  • 12.3. Noninvasive neuromodulation using transcranial stimulation
  • 12.4. Summary
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 332
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 12, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323919128
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323985260

About the Author

Jos J. Eggermont

Dr. Jos J. Eggermont is an Emeritus Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, and Psychology at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. Dr. Eggermont is one of the most renowned scientists in the field of the auditory system and his work has contributed substantially to the current knowledge about hearing loss. His research comprises most aspects of audition with an emphasis on the electrophysiology of the auditory system in experimental animals. He has published over 225 scientific articles, authored/edited 10 books, and contributed to over 100 book chapters all focusing on the auditory system.

Affiliations and Expertise

Emeritus Professor, Departments of Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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