The Objectives of the New International Economic Order - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780080236971, 9781483152943

The Objectives of the New International Economic Order

1st Edition

Pergamon Policy Studies

Authors: Ervin Laszlo Robert Baker Elliott Eisenberg
eBook ISBN: 9781483152943
Imprint: Pergamon
Published Date: 1st January 1978
Page Count: 288
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Description

The Objectives of the New International Economic Order focuses on the role of the New International Economic Order (NIEO) in the resolution of issues in world economy, international trade, economic policies, trade relations, and business practices. The manuscript first offers information on the objectives of the NIEO in historical and global perspectives, as well as the political relevance of the NIEO, historical factors in the emergence of the NIEO, and contrary perceptions and vicious circles. The book also takes a look at the objectives of the NIEO regarding issues in world economy. Concerns include renegotiating the debts of developing countries, attaining United Nations development assistance targets, and using funds from disarmament for development. The publication discusses international trade and world economy issues. Topics include adjusting the economic policies of developed countries to facilitate the expansion and diversification of the exports of developing countries; improving and intensifying trade relations between countries having different social and economic systems; and increasing the transfer of resources through the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. The text also elaborates on industrialization issues, technology transfer, and business practices and social issues. The book is a vital source of information for readers interested in the role of NIEO in the resolution of issues in world economy, international trade, economic policies, trade relations, and business practices.

Table of Contents


Introduction

A Note on Methodology

Acknowledgements

25 Key Issues of the World Economy in the Context of the NIEO

Part I The Objectives of the New Economic Order Concerning 25 Key Issues of the World Economy

Chapter 1 - Aid and Assistance Issues

1. Attaining United Nations Official Development Assistance Targets

2. Providing Technical Assistance for Development and Eliminating the Brain Drain

3. Renegotiating the Debts of Developing Countries

4. Undertaking Special Measures to Assist Land-Locked, Least-Developed and Island Developing Countries

5. Using Funds from Disarmament for Development

Chapter 2 - International Trade Issues

6. Improving the Terms and Conditions of Trade of Developing Countries: Tariff and Non-Tariff Barriers, GSP, Duties and Taxes on Imports, Invisible Trade

7. Adopting an Integrated Approach to Commodities: The Integrated Programme, Buffer Stocks, Producers* Associations, Indexation

8. Developing an International Food Programme 65

9. Adjusting the Economic Policies of Developed Countries to Facilitate the Expansion and Diversification of the Exports of Developing Countries

10. Improving and Intensifying Trade Relations Between Countries Having Different Social and Economic Systems

11. Strengthening Economic and Technical Cooperation Among Developing Countries

Chapter 3 - International Financial Issues

12. Reforming the International Monetary System: Using Special Drawing Rights for Development Assistance and as the Central Reserve Asset of the International Monetary System, Promoting Stable Rates of Exchange and Protection from the Effects of Inflation

13. Assuring Adequate Participation by Developing Countries in World Bank and IMF Decision Making

14. Increasing the Transfer of Resources through the World Bank and IMF

Chapter 4 - Issues of Industrialization, Technology Transfer and Business Practices

15. Negotiating the Redeployment of Industrial Productive Capacities to Developing Countries

16. Establishing Mechanisms for the Transfer of Technology to Developing Countries

17. Regulating and Supervising the Activities of Transnational Enterprises and Eliminating Restrictive Business Practices

18. Improving the Competitiveness of Natural Resources and Ending their Waste

19. Providing Equitable Access to the Resources of the Seabed and the Ocean Floor

Chapter 5 - Social Issues

20. Achieving a More Equitable Distribution of Income and Raising the Level of Employment

21. Providing Health Services, Education, Higher Cultural Standards and Qualification for the Work Force, and Assuring the Well-being of Children and the Integration of Women in Development

Chapter 6 - Political and Institutional Issues

22. Assuring the Economic Sovereignty of States: Natural Resources, Foreign Property, Choice of Economic System

23. Compensating for Adverse Effects on the Resources of States, Territories and People of Foreign Occupation, Alien and Colonial Domination or Apartheid

24. Establishing a System of Consultations at Global, Regional and Sectoral Levels with the Aim of Promoting Industrial Development

25. Restructuring the Economic and Social Sections of the United Nations

Part II The Position of Some States and Groups of States on the Issues

Chapter 7 - Aid and Assistance Issues

1. Attaining United Nations Official Development Assistance Targets

2. Providing Technical Assistance for Development and Eliminating the Brain Drain

3. Renegotiating the Debts of Developing Countries

4. Undertaking Special Measures to Assist Land-Locked, Least-Developed and Island Developing Countries

5. Using Funds from Disarmament for Development

Chapter 8 - International Trade Issues

6. Improving the Terms and Conditions of Trade of Developing Countries: Tariff and Non-Tariff Barriers, GSP, Duties and Taxes on Imports, Invisible Trade

7. Adopting an Integrated Approach to Commodities: The Integrated Programme, Buffer Stocks, Producers' Associations, Indexation

8. Developing an International Food Program

9. Adjusting the Economic Policies of Developed Countries to Facilitate the Expansion and Diversification of the Exports of Developing Countries

10. Improving and Intensifying Trade Relations Between Countries Having Different Social and Economic Systems

11. Strengthening Economic and Technical Cooperation Among Developing Countries

Chapter 9 - International Financial Issues

12. Reforming the International Monetary System: Using Special Drawing Rights for Development Assistance and as the Central Reserve Asset of the International Monetary System, Promoting Stable Rates of Exchange and Protection from the Effects of Inflation

13. Assuring Adequate Participation by Developing Countries in World Bank and IMF Decision Making

14. Increasing the Transfer of Resources through the World Bank and IMF

Chapter 10 - Issues of Industrialization, Technology Transfer and Business Practices

15. Negotiating the Redeployment of Industrial Productive Capacities to Developing Countries

16. Establishing Mechanisms for the Transfer of Technology to Developing Countries

17. Regulating and Supervising the Activities of Transnational Enterprises and Eliminating Restrictive Business Practices

18. Improving the Competitiveness of Natural Resources and Ending their Waste

19. Providing Equitable Access to the Resources of the Seabed and the Ocean Floor

Chapter 11 - Social Issues

20. Achieving a More Equitable Distribution of Income and Raising the Level of Employment

21. Providing Health Services, Education, Higher Cultural Standards and Qualification for the Work Force, and Assuring the Well-being of Children and the Integration of Women in Development

Chapter 12 - Political and Institutional Issues

22. Assuring the Economic Sovereignty of States: Natural Resources, Foreign Property, Choice of Economic System

23. Compensating for Adverse Effects on the Resources of States, Territories and People of Foreign Occupation, Alien and Colonial Domination or Apartheid

24. Establishing a System of Consultations at Global, Regional and Sectoral Levels with the Aim of Promoting Industrial Development

25. Restructuring the Economic and Social Sections of the United Nations

Chapter 13 - List of Document Sources

Index

About the Authors

Details

No. of pages:
288
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Pergamon 1978
Published:
Imprint:
Pergamon
eBook ISBN:
9781483152943

About the Author

Ervin Laszlo

Robert Baker

Robert Baker served over two decades as a Special Agent with the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI). Upon leaving the service, Mr. Baker served as the security manager for a major computer manufacturer and a major telecommunications company. In 1986, Mr. Baker joined Midway Airlines as their initial Director of Security and Safety where he was responsible for the overall security of all domestic and international passenger flights. After serving seven years, Mr. Baker accepted a contract position supporting the Federal Aviation Administration Security Laboratory where he participated in aviation security research and development projects. In 1995, Mr. Baker joined DHL Airways as a Regional Security & Safety Manager and was subsequently promoted to the Director of Security & Safety for DHL Worldwide Express. Again, he was responsible for the operational security of all domestic and international cargo flights and operations. In April 2002, Mr. Baker returned to contract research and development work at the TSA Security Laboratory where he provided technical expertise in the aviation security area. Following the terrorist attacks in September 2001, Mr. Baker joined the Transportation Security Administration. During this period, he led joint TSA and FBI teams assessing the missile threat at domestic and international airports, conducted aircraft operator inspections and enforcement investigations, served as the Principal Security Inspector for 120 aircraft operators, and participated in the development of cargo security policies and regulations. In 2005, Mr. Baker accepted a position as an Associate Professor in the Global Intelligence and Security Department at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona. Professor Baker holds a M.A. in Criminal Justice from Washington State University and a B.S. in Law Enforcement & Corrections from the University of Nebraska. He is a current member of the American Association of Airport Executives

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Profesor, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ

Elliott Eisenberg

Ratings and Reviews