The Epidermis - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781483232935, 9781483261676

The Epidermis

1st Edition

Editors: William Montagna Walter C. Lobitz
eBook ISBN: 9781483261676
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 1st January 1964
Page Count: 670
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Description

The Epidermis documents the proceedings of a symposium that explored in detail the fundamental aspects of the epidermis and the still poorly understood process of keratinization. The Division of Dermatology, University Extension and the School of Medicine of the University of California at Los Angeles agreed to sponsor the conference and offered the University's Residential Conference Center at Lake Arrowhead for the meeting place. This volume is a source book of basic dermatologic thought and information. More than a book of dermatology, this volume makes a singular contribution to our knowledge of keratinization. The volume contains 37 papers and opens with an introductory chapter on keratinization, focusing on the history of the keratohyalin granules, the role of lipids in the orderly keratinization of the epidermis, and the desquamation process. Subsequent chapters present studies on topics such as the behavior of the skin; the effects of various experimental conditions on keratinization in organ culture; and the localization and the regional variability in the concentration epidermal enzymes.

Table of Contents


Dedication

List of Contributors

Preface

I. Keratinization in Historical Perspective

I. Introduction

II. Keratohyalin Granules

III. The Role of Lipids in Keratinization

IV. Desquamation

V. References

II. The Determinism of the Differentiation of the Skin and the Cutaneous Appendages of the Chick Embryo

I. Introduction

II. Behavior of the Skin In Vitro

III. The Role of the Dermis and of the Epidermis in the Differentiation of the Feather Germ and of the Scales

IV. Role of the Nervous System and of the Axial Organs in the Differentiation of the Feather Germs

V. Conclusions

VI. References

IIIA. Feather Formation and Synthesis of Keratin by Primary Skin Cells and by Skin Cells Grown In Vitro

I. Introduction

II. Materials and Methods

III. Results

IV. Discussion

V. References

IIIB. A Note on Feather Keratin

Text

References

IV. The Experimental Study of Keratinization in Organ Culture

I. Introduction

II. Histogenesis of Normal Chicken Epidermis

III. Some Environmental Factors in the Normal Differentiation of Chicken Epidermis

IV. Modification of Epidermal Differentiation by Contact with Heterotypic Mesenchyme

V. Effects of Chemical Agents on Keratinization

VI. Discussion

VII. References

V. Studies on Stability of Phenotypic Traits in Embryonic Integumental Tissues and Cells

I. Introduction

II. The Development of Aggregates of Dissociated Skin Cells

III. Chimaeric Skin in Co-Aggregates of Embryonic Mouse and Chick Skin Cells

IV. Changes in Differentiative Behavior of Skin Cells Maintained in Monolayer Cultures

V. Keratinization of the Chorion of CAM

VI. Remarks

VII. References

VI. Secretion of a Connective Tissue Protein by Developing Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. The Structure of the Basement Lamella and Its Relation to the Reticular Layer of the Dermis

III. Formation of the Basement Lamella in Regenerating Salamander Limbs

IV. Concluding Remarks

V. References

VII. Aspects of Cell Individuality in the Renewal of Stratified Squamous Epithelia

I. Introduction

II. Experimental Methods

III. Results and Discussion

IV. Summary

V. References

VIII. Enzymes of the Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. Observations

III. Conclusions

IV. References

IX. Quantitative Histochemistry of Skin

I. Introduction

II. Methods

III. Enzyme Activity of Human Epidermis

IV. Enzyme Activity of Various Strata and Skin Appendages

V. Summary and Conclusions

VI. References

X. Protein Synthesis and Epidermal Differentiation

I. Introduction

II. Differentiation in Multicellular Systems

III. The Fine Structure of the Developing Epidermis

IV. The Control of Protein Synthesis

V. Control Systems in Complex Cells

VI. Membranes and Morphogenesis

VII. Adaptive Responses of Epidermal Cells

VIII. Concluding Remarks

IX. References

XI. Structural and Biochemical Features of the Hair Follicle

I. Introduction

II. Fine Structure of Fully Hardened Keratins

III. Development of Keratin in the Hair Follicle

IV. Chemistry and Structure of the Medulla and the Inner Root Sheath

V. Cell Membranes in the Follicle

VI. The Outer Root Sheath and Associated Structures

VII. General Remarks

VIII. Acknowledgments

IX. References

XII. Tonofilaments and Keratohyalin

I. Introduction

II. Material and Methods

III. Observations

IV. Summary

V. References

XIII. Different Staining Methods for the Electron-Microscopic Elucidation of the Tonofibrillar Differentiation in Normal Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. Material and Methods

III. Results

IV. Discussion

V. Summary

VI. References

XIV. A Possible Role of the Desmosome in the Process of Keratinization

An Electron-Microscopic Study of Acantholysis and Dyskeratosis

I. Introduction

II. The Morphology of the Desmosome at Various Levels of the Epidermis during Normal Keratinization

III. The Loss of Desmosomes in Acantholytic Diseases and the Interrelationship of Acantholysis and Dyskeratosis

IV. The Etiology of Acantholysis and Dyskeratosis

V. Summary

VI. Nomenclature

VII. References

XV. Ultrastructural Evidence Related to the Mechanism of Keratin Synthesis

I. Introduction

II. Materials and Methods

III. Observations

IV. Discussion

V. Summary

VI. Key to Symbols Used in the Illustrations

VII. References

XVI. A Theory for the Structure of α-Keratin

I. Introduction

II. A Model Derived from Stereochemical Data

III. Electron-Microscopic Investigations of the Structure of the Microfibril

IV. Conclusions

V. References

XVII. Biosynthesis of Epidermal Proteins

I. Observations

II. Summary

III. References

XVIII. Alkali-Soluble Human Epidermal Proteins

I. Introduction

II. Materials and Methods

III. Results

IV. Discussion

V. Summary

VI. References

XIX. Dermatoglyphics: A Brief Review

I. Introduction

II. Surface Anatomy

III. Embryology

IV. Inheritance

V. Race

VI. Constitution

VII. Closing Remarks

VIII. References

XX. The Biology of the Stratum Corneum

I. Introduction

II. Anatomical Misconceptions

III. Phylogenetic Considerations

IV. Isolation and Preparation of the Stratum Corneum

V. Epidermal Biology

VI. Stratigraphy of the Horny Layer

VII. Desquamation of the Horny Layer

VIII. Daily Production of Horny Material

IX. Microanatomy of Horny Cells

X. Horny Layer Measurements

XI. The Construction of the Horny Cell

XII. Stripping of Stratum Corneum

XIII. The Cohesion of Epidermal Cells

XIV. Water Loss

XV. Localization of the Rate-Limiting Membrane

XVI. References

XXI. Permeability of the Stratum Corneum

I. Introduction

II. Absorption Pathways

III. Factors Affecting Percutaneous Absorption

IV. Factors Promoting Percutaneous Absorption

V. References

XXII. Some Aspects of the Carbohydrate Metabolism Enzymes in the Human Epidermis under Normal and Pathological Conditions

I. Introduction

II. Observations and Discussion

III. References

XXIII. Relation of the Nucleic Acids to Protein Synthesis in the Mammalian Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. Biosynthetic Locus of DNA in the Epidermis

III. Biosynthetic Locus of RNA in the Epidermis

IV. Location of RNase and DNase in the Epidermis

V. The Locus of Amino Acid Incorporation into Protein in the Epidermis

VI. Summary

VII. References

XXIV. Carbohydrate Metabolism in the Skin

I. Carbohydrate Metabolism in the Skin

II. References

XXV. Sterol Metabolism in Skin and Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. Steroid Biogenesis in Skin

III. Other Steroids Found in Skin and Surface Films

IV. Sites of Steroid Biosynthesis in Skin

V. Factors That Influence the Steroid Composition of Skin and Surface Films

VI. References

XXVI. Lipids, Membranes, and the Human Epidermis

I. Introduction

II. The Lipids

III. Lipids and Membranes

IV. Lipids, Membranes, and the Human Epidermis

V. Summary

VI. References

XXVII. Chemical Anomalies in Pathological Horny Layers

I. Introduction

II. Induced Dermatoses

III. Naturally Occurring Scaling Dermatoses

IV. Biochemical Aspects

V. Summary

VI. Acknowledgments

VII. References

XXVIII. Cytoplasmic Components in the Psoriatic Horny Layers with Special Reference to Electron-Microscopic Findings

I. Introduction

II. Fibrils

III. Nonfibrillar Components

IV. Summary

V. References

XXIX. Definition of Epidermal Cancer

I. Introduction

II. Normal Epidermal Cell

III. Benign Hyperplasia-Psoriasis

IV. Basal Cell Cancer

V. Squamous Cell Cancer

VI. Other Epithelial Tumors

VII. Summary

VIII. References

XXX. The Papilloma of Rabbits Induced by the Virus of Shope: Histologic Features Related to Amount of Virus in the Tumor

I. Introduction

II. The Shope Papilloma

III. Summary

IV. References

XXXI. Vesication and Acantholysis

I. Introduction

II. Acantholysis

III. The Uses of Cantharidin

IV. Newer Findings

V. References

XXXII. Some Observations on Epidermolysis Bullosa and Experimental Blisters

I. Introduction

II. Materials and Methods

III. Results

IV. Discussion

V. Summary

VI. References

Author Index

Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
670
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1964
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9781483261676

About the Editor

William Montagna

Affiliations and Expertise

Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, Beaverton, U.S.A.

Walter C. Lobitz

Ratings and Reviews