Description

Despite the world’s aging population, suitable clothing for the older community is a largely neglected area. This book considers the needs of the growing number of active older people and investigates how recent developments in textiles, fibres, finishes, design and integrated technology can be deployed to serve this group and improve quality of life.

Part I provides an understanding of the active aging population by considering the group’s experiences of and attitudes towards clothing and reviewing the barriers to their adoption of new wearable technologies. Part II focuses on the needs of the older population, including effective communication with designers and the age-related anatomical and physiological changes that designs should consider. Part III reviews design requirements and processes, and finally Part IV reviews the manufacture of suitable apparel, with chapters on suitable textile fibres, balancing technology and aesthetics and wearable electronics.

Key Features

  • Summarises the wealth of recent research on attitudes to clothing amongst the active ageing population
  • Looks into how their aspirations can be investigated and appropriate apparel designed to meet their needs
  • Examines design and manufacturing issues, including ways of accommodating physiological changes with age and the use of wearable electronics

Readership

Textile scientists; Technologists; Engineers and those designing and manufacturing textiles; Academics and researchers in the textile field

Table of Contents

  • The Textile Institute and Woodhead Publishing
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles
  • Part One. Understanding the active ageing population
    • 1. Technological culture and the active ageing: a lifetime of technological advances
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Learning and teaching
      • 1.3. Photography, audiovisual technologies, and e-learning
      • 1.4. Implications for the active ageing
      • 1.5. Conclusions
      • 1.6. Sources of further information and advice
    • 2. Clothing, identity, embodiment and age
      • 2.1. Introduction: clothing, social identity and age
      • 2.2. Age ordering
      • 2.3. Age-related clothing
      • 2.4. The changing cultural location of older people
      • 2.5. Baby boomers
      • 2.6. Casual dress
      • 2.7. Adjusting the cut
      • 2.8. Conclusion
    • 3. Attitudes to apparel amongst the baby boomer generation
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. The baby boomers and the growth of marketing
      • 3.3. Baby boomers and their interaction with apparel and textiles
      • 3.4. Market implications
      • 3.5. Current lifestyle trends for the baby boomers and product needs for the future
      • 3.6. Conclusion
    • 4. The importance of colour in textiles and clothing for an ageing population
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Attitudes towards colour amongst the active ageing
      • 4.3. The colour selection process for clothing
      • 4.4. Colour forecasting
      • 4.5. Classic and changing colours
      • 4.6. How the colour selection process starts: designers and inspiration
      • 4.7. Sharing information: the case of the British Textile Colour Group
      • 4.8. How colour palettes are used
      • 4.9. From colour palette to product
      • 4.10. Conclusion
    • 5. The adoption and nonadoption of new technologies by the active ageing
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2

Details

No. of pages:
574
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
Print ISBN:
9780857095381
Electronic ISBN:
9780857098788

About the editors

Jane McCann

Jane McCann is Director of the Smart Clothes and Wearable Technologies (SCWT) Research Centre at University of Wales Newport, UK. Her research at SCWT concentrates on the application of smart and intelligent textiles for functional clothing in the areas of protective and corporate wear, performance sport and inclusive clothing design. She was the recipient of the ‘Misha Black Award for Innovation in Design Education’ in 2003 from the Royal College of Art.

David Bryson

David Bryson is a Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology at the University of Derby, UK. His research interests include the use of scientific photography and multimedia to support learning teaching and assessment in applied science, art and design.