Sustainability of Products, Processes and Supply Chains - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444634726, 9780444634917

Sustainability of Products, Processes and Supply Chains, Volume 36

1st Edition

Theory and Applications

Series Volume Editors: Fengqi You
eBook ISBN: 9780444634917
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444634726
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 1st May 2015
Page Count: 692
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Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • Part I Process design and optimization for sustainability
    • Chapter 1. Optimization Models for Process Water Networks and Their Application to Biofuel Processes
      • 1.1. Intro/motivation
      • 1.2. Water Network
      • 1.3. Biorefinery Processes
      • 1.4. Water Optimization in Bioprocesses
      • 1.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 2. Energy Efficient Chiller Configuration—A Design Perspective
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Chiller Arrangements
      • 2.3. Modeling Energy Efficiency of a Centrifugal Chiller
      • 2.4. Comparison of Energy Efficiency—Series versus Parallel
      • 2.5. Conclusions
      • Nomenclature
    • Chapter 3. Modeling Sustainable Chemical Processes for Biofuels
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Introduction to Algae Processing
      • 3.3. Physical Properties
      • 3.4. Running Aspen in Reverse
      • 3.5. Sustainability Models
      • 3.6. Carbon and Water Management
      • 3.7. Energy Management and Lost Work
      • 3.8. Technoeconomic Models
      • 3.9. Overall Sustainability Index
      • 3.10. Conclusions
    • Chapter 4. Sustainable Design and Operation of a Reactive Distillation System Used for the Production of Cosmetic Ingredients
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Proposed Methodology
      • 4.3. Results and Discussion
      • 4.4. Conclusions
      • Appendix
      • List of Acronyms Used
      • List of Symbols Used
    • Chapter 5. A Graphical Method for Hydrogen Network Integration with Purification Reuse
      • 5.1. Background
      • 5.2. Hydrogen Network Integration
      • 5.3. Graphical Method
      • 5.4. Graphical Method with Fixed Purification Parameters
      • 5.5. Case Study for Graphical Method With Fixed Purification Parameters
      • 5.6. Graphical Method for the Optimization of Purification Reuse
      • 5.7. Case Study for Graphical Method with Optimized Purification Performance
      • 5.8. Conclusions
    • Chapter 6. A New Biochemical Fermentation Process Design Method Considering Bifurcations and Oscillations
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Dynamic Model of Fermentation Process
      • 6.3. Identification of Hopf Singularities
      • 6.4. Hopf Singularities in the Z. mobilis Fermentation Process
      • 6.5. Regulation of Oscillatory Phenomena
      • 6.6. Operating Condition Optimization
      • 6.7. Discussion
      • 6.8. Conclusion
      • Appendix
      • Nomenclature
  • Part II Carbon capture utilization and sequestration
    • Chapter 7. Sustainable Process Design: Sustainable Process Networks for Carbon Dioxide Conversion
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Identifying More Sustainable Designs
      • 7.3. Method and Tools
      • 7.4. More Sustainable CO2 Conversion Process Designs
      • 7.5. Conclusions
    • Chapter 8. Pressure Swing Adsorption Optimization Strategies for CO2 Capture
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. PSA Superstructure and Mathematical Model
      • 8.3. Comparison of Flux Limiters
      • 8.4. Utilizing Sparse Linear Algebra to Improve Computational Efficiency
      • 8.5. Optimization Diagnostics
      • 8.6. Case Study: Optimization of PSA Systems for CO2 Capture and High H2 Recovery
      • 8.7. Conclusion and Future Directions
      • Notations
    • Chapter 9. Superstructure-Based Optimal Design of Pipeline Network for CO2 Transport in Large-Scale Carbon Capture and Sequestration
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Optimization Problem Description
      • 9.3. Previous Studies on CO2 Thermophysical and Hydraulic Properties
      • 9.4. Previous Studies on CCS Project Cost Estimation
      • 9.5. Previous Studies on Models for CCS Pipeline Network Design
      • 9.6. Future Research Areas for CO2 Pipeline Network Design
      • 9.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 10. Optimization and Technoeconomic Analysis of Rapid Temperature Swing Adsorption Process for Carbon Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plant
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Modeling Approach
      • 10.3. Optimization Approach
      • 10.4. Results and Discussions
      • 10.5. Conclusions and Future Work
      • Appendix
      • Nomenclature
    • Chapter 11. Toward Sustainable Solvent-Based Postcombustion CO2 Capture: From Molecules to Conceptual Flowsheet Design
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. The Solvent-Based CO2 Capture System
      • 11.3. Proposed Multiscale Design Approach
      • 11.4. Implementation
      • 11.5. Results of Multi Scale Design
      • 11.6. Conclusions and Perspectives
      • Appendix
    • Chapter 12. Selection of Sustainable Processes Using Sustainability Footprint Method: A Case Study of Methanol Production from Carbon Dioxide
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Background Literature
      • 12.3. Problem Formulation
      • 12.4. Results and Discussions
      • 12.5. Conclusions and Future Work
  • Part III Sustainable supply chains
    • Chapter 13. Design and Planning of Sustainable Supply Chains
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Literature Review
      • 13.3. Methodology
      • 13.4. Case Study
      • 13.5. Conclusions and Future Work
    • Chapter 14. Operability Analysis of Process Supply Chains—Toward the Development of a Sustainable Bioeconomy
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Supply Chain Operability
      • 14.3. Process Plant Operability
      • 14.4. Mathematical Programming Framework for Supply Chain Operability Analysis
      • 14.5. Case Studies
      • 14.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 15. Dynamic Simulation-Based Assessment of Supply Chain Sustainability
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Supply Chain Operation and Sustainability
      • 15.3. Dynamic Simulation Model of Supply Chain Operation
      • 15.4. Case Studies
      • 15.5. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 16. Transport and Logistics Models for Sustainability
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Mathematical Models
      • 16.3. Conclusions
      • Appendix
    • Chapter 17. Dynamic Optimization for the Optimal Location of New Industrial Facilities Considering the Sustainability of the Watershed
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Problem Statement
      • 17.3. Model Formulation
      • 17.4. Results and Discussion
      • 17.5. Conclusions
      • Nomenclature
  • Part IV Bioenergy supply chains
    • Chapter 18. Strategic Planning of Biomass Supply Chain Networks for Co-combustion Plants
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Problem Statement
      • 18.3. Mathematical Model
      • 18.4. Case Study
      • 18.5. Conclusions
      • Notation
    • Chapter 19. Supply Chains and Optimization for Biorefineries
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Literature Review
      • 19.3. Case Studies
      • 19.4. Conclusions
    • Chapter 20. Optimal Supply Chains for Biofuel Production
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Multiobjective Optimization
      • 20.3. Supply Chain Scope
      • 20.4. Solution Strategy
      • 20.5. Life Cycle Analysis
      • 20.6. Results
      • 20.7. Conclusions
    • Chapter 21. Optimal Harvest Management Adaptation for a New Biorefinery Investment in a Timberlands Supply Chain Using a Modified Cyclic Scheduling Model
      • 21.1. Introduction
      • 21.2. Problem Statement
      • 21.3. Problem Generation and Case Studies
      • 21.4. Results
      • 21.5. Conclusions
      • Appendix
    • Chapter 22. Bioethanol Supply Chain Design and Optimization: Some Achievements and Future Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Biorefineries
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Biofuel Production System Design: Key Modeling Assumptions
      • 22.3. GrSCM in the Strategic Design of Biofuel Systems
      • 22.4. The Design of New Biofuel SCs in the Presence of Uncertainty Factors
      • 22.5. Discussion and Final Remarks
  • Part V Sustainability analysis methodologies
    • Chapter 23. An Integrated Multiscale Modeling Framework for Sustainable Process Design Applications
      • 23.1. Introduction and Context
      • 23.2. Modeling Framework
      • 23.3. Demonstration: Polymer Supply Chain Design
      • 23.4. Conclusions
    • Chapter 24. Social Sustainability of Complex Systems
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Social Sustainability
      • 24.3. Social Sustainability of Complex System
      • 24.4. Case Study
    • Chapter 25. Economic Sustainability of Products and Processes
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. Three Pillars of Sustainability
      • 25.3. Economic Sustainability
      • 25.4. Conclusions
      • Notations
  • Index

Description

Sustainability of Products, Processes and Supply Chains: Theory and Applications presents the recent theoretical developments and applications on the interface between sustainability and process systems engineering. It offers a platform for cutting-edge, holistic analyses of key challenges associated with computer-aided tools for incorporating sustainability principles and approaches into the design and operations of multi-scale process systems, ranging from molecular and products systems, to energy and chemical processes, and supply chains.

Key Features

  • Presents recent theoretical developments and applications on the interface between sustainability engineering and process engineering
  • Offers cutting-edge, holistic analyses of key challenges associated with computer-aided tools for incorporating sustainability principles and approaches into the design and operations of multi-scale process systems
  • Brings together the perspectives of leading researchers to stimulate innovative thinking in terms of sustainability

Readership

Researchers of sustainability, product design, process and energy systems modeling, and supply chain optimization industrial professionals working on sustainability analysis, product development, process design and supply chain management


Details

No. of pages:
692
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444634917
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444634726

About the Series Volume Editors

Fengqi You Series Volume Editor

Fengqi You is an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern University. His research focuses on the development of novel computational models, optimization techniques, and systems analysis & design methods for process systems engineering, energy systems and sustainability. His research accomplishments have been highlighted by multiple news media (e.g. New York Times and Bloomberg Businessweek) and journal covers (e.g. Energy & Environmental Science). He received several competitive awards, including the W. David Smith, Jr. Graduate Publication Award from the CAST Division of AIChE, the Director’s Fellowship from Argonne National Laboratory, and the 2013 Northwestern-Argonne Early Career Investigator Award. Fengqi You received his PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 2009 and a BS from Tsinghua University in 2005, both in chemical engineering. From 2009 to 2011, he was an Argonne Scholar at Argonne National Laboratory before joining the faculty of Northwestern University in 2011. More information can be found from his research group website .

Affiliations and Expertise

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA