Sustainability of Construction Materials - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780081003701, 9780081003916

Sustainability of Construction Materials

2nd Edition

Editors: Jamal Khatib
eBook ISBN: 9780081003916
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081009956
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 26th August 2016
Page Count: 742
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
225.00
157.50
157.50
157.50
157.50
157.50
180.00
180.00
315.00
236.25
236.25
236.25
236.25
236.25
252.00
252.00
190.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
133.00
152.00
152.00
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil and Structural Engineering
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Principles of sustainability and life-cycle analysis
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 The concept of sustainable construction
    • 2.3 Construction materials and sustainability
    • 2.4 The role of the LCA concept
    • 2.5 LCA application in construction
    • 2.6 Conclusion
  • 3: Intrinsic properties controlling the sustainability of construction
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Effect of physical properties on durability
    • 3.3 Diffusion coefficient in cementitious materials
    • 3.4 Correlation between porosity and permeability
    • 3.5 Heat and mass interlinking
    • 3.6 Vapor–liquid interaction
    • 3.7 Durability of bio-based material
    • 3.8 Future trends
  • 4: Nanotechnologies for sustainable construction
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Nanotechnology for sustainable construction
    • 4.3 Health and environmental risks
    • 4.4 Selected examples of green nanoconstruction
  • 5: Sustainability of glass in construction
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Silica glass
    • 5.3 Production of soda–lime–silica flat glass sheets
    • 5.4 Properties having influence on choice of glass as a construction material
    • 5.5 Glass as a construction material
    • 5.6 Applications of glass to engineer reductions in operational carbon
    • 5.7 Use of glass in low energy, passive house buildings
    • 5.8 Glass: A sustainable construction material
    • 5.9 Glass as a structural material
    • 5.10 Glass structural design criteria
    • 5.11 Connections in glass
    • 5.12 Detailed finite element analysis
    • 5.13 Future trends
  • 6: Sustainability of metals and alloys in construction
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Ferrous alloys
    • 6.3 Stainless steel
    • 6.4 Weathering steels
    • 6.5 Nonferrous metals and alloys
    • 6.6 Corrosion
    • 6.7 Corrosion protection and prevention
    • 6.8 Future trends
  • 7: Sustainability of timber and wood in construction
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Forest resources
    • 7.3 Timber use and engineering issues
    • 7.4 Durability
    • 7.5 Material environmental assessment
    • 7.6 Wood construction and LCA
    • 7.7 Future trends
  • 8: Sustainability of engineered wood products
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Comparative performance of EWPs and sawn timber
    • 8.3 Environmental performance of EWPs
    • 8.4 Usability of wood fibre
    • 8.5 Finger jointed timber
    • 8.6 Structural glued laminated timber (glulam)
    • 8.7 Structural composite lumber
    • 8.8 Structural I-beams
    • 8.9 Cross-laminated timber
    • 8.10 Oriented strand board
    • 8.11 Plywood
    • 8.12 Chipboard or particleboard
    • 8.13 Fibreboard
    • 8.14 Adhesives
    • 8.15 Future trends
  • 9: Sustainability of aggregates in construction
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Production of aggregate
    • 9.3 Substitutes and manufactured aggregates
    • 9.4 Extending aggregate availability through recycling
    • 9.5 Performance of aggregate in use
    • 9.6 Waste products from aggregate mining and processing
    • 9.7 Sustainability of natural aggregate
    • 9.8 Status of sustainable aggregate resource management
    • 9.9 General approaches to sustainable aggregate resource management
    • 9.10 Case studies
    • 9.11 Future trends
    • 9.12 Sources of further information and advice
  • 10: The sustainability of lightweight aggregates manufactured from clay wastes for reducing the carbon footprint of structural and foundation concrete
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Concrete development
    • 10.3 Lightweight aggregates
    • 10.4 A brief description of the various lightweight aggregates available in the UK, their manufacture, properties and applications
    • 10.5 Expanded clay LWA manufacture for structural and foundation concrete
    • 10.6 Lightweight aggregate, current kilns and manufacture
    • 10.7 Environmental aspects
    • 10.8 CO2 Savings from the lightweight concrete structures produced
    • 10.9 Embodied CO2 Summary
    • 10.10 Conclusions
  • 11: Sustainability of masonry in construction
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Additional sources of information
    • 11.3 Definitions
    • 11.4 Facts and figures
    • 11.5 Manufacture of masonry units and mortar
    • 11.6 Standards for masonry
    • 11.7 Properties of masonry
    • 11.8 Historical use of masonry
    • 11.9 Sustainability
    • 11.10 Examples of sustainable masonry construction
    • 11.11 Future trends
  • 12: Sustainability of natural stone as a construction material
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Stone exploited
    • 12.3 Material characteristics
    • 12.4 Stone performance
    • 12.5 Sustainable use of natural stone in construction
  • 13: Sustainability of compressed earth as a construction material
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Environmental issues
    • 13.3 Social-cultural issues
    • 13.4 Economic issues
    • 13.5 Prospects of durability of cement stabilisation
    • 13.6 Sustainability: A focus of modern research
    • 13.7 Surface protection of earth walls: Past and present
    • 13.8 Need for further development of compressed earth block
    • 13.9 Durability assessment parameters
    • 13.10 A sustainable option: Shelled compressed earth block
    • 13.11 Future trends
  • 14: Sustainability of bituminous materials
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Introduction to bituminous materials
    • 14.2 Bituminous binders
    • 14.3 Characteristics of bitumen
    • 14.4 Bituminous mixtures
    • 14.5 Sustainability by design
    • 14.6 Preservative maintenance
    • 14.7 Future trends
  • 15: Sustainability of cement, concrete and cement replacement materials in construction
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Manufacturing of concrete
    • 15.3 Life cycle aspects and environmental impact of concrete
    • 15.4 A concrete structure, from cradle-to-grave
    • 15.5 Lowering the environmental impact of concrete
    • 15.6 Case studies
    • 15.7 Future trends
  • 16: Durability of sustainable construction materials
    • Abstract
    • 16.1 Introduction
    • 16.2 Degradation of materials
    • 16.3 Durability of sustainable construction materials
    • 16.4 Future trend
  • 17: Low clinker cement as a sustainable construction material
    • Abstract
    • 17.1 Ground granulated blast-furnace slag
    • 17.2 Natural pozzolans
    • 17.3 Fly ashes
    • 17.4 Silica fume
    • 17.5 Metakaolin
    • 17.6 The environmental benefits of SCMs
    • 17.7 Future trends
  • 18: Sustainability of alkali-activated cementitious materials and geopolymers
    • Abstract
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 The manufacture of inorganic polymers
    • 18.3 Fresh properties
    • 18.4 Mechanical properties
    • 18.5 Physical and durability properties
    • 18.6 Structural applications
    • 18.7 Future trends
  • 19: Sustainable use of vegetable fibres and particles in civil construction
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgements
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Availability, extraction, and characteristics
    • 19.3 Manufacturing and processing of raw materials
    • 19.4 General uses and market of vegetal fibres
    • 19.5 Case study I: use of colloidal silica in cement-based composites
    • 19.6 Case study II: vegetable fibres in particleboard
    • 19.7 Future trends
  • 20: Sustainability of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) as a construction material
    • Abstract
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 FRPs in engineering applications
    • 20.3 Manufacturing process
    • 20.4 FRPs in civil engineering
    • 20.5 FRPs in building construction and transportation infrastructures
    • 20.6 Durability of FRPs
    • 20.7 Sustainability concept for FRP materials
    • 20.8 Recycling of FRPs
    • 20.9 Policies and standards for sustainable use of FRPs
    • 20.10 Future trends
  • 21: Sustainability of fibre composite concrete construction
    • Abstract
    • 21.1 Introductory overview
    • 21.2 Types of fibre composites in the building industry
    • 21.3 Fibres used in concrete
    • 21.4 Fibres as ingredient of concrete
    • 21.5 Applications of fibre-reinforced concrete
    • 21.6 Performance of fibre reinforcement in concrete
    • 21.7 Recent developments
    • 21.8 Concrete sustainability and the role of fibre reinforcement
    • 21.9 Future trends
  • 22: Sustainability of wastepaper in construction
    • Abstract
    • 22.1 Introduction
    • 22.2 Modern paper manufacture
    • 22.3 Wastepaper
    • 22.4 Paper recycling
    • 22.5 Production and properties of wastepaper sludge ash (WSA)
    • 22.6 Properties and utilization of wastepaper sludge ash (WSA) in construction
    • 22.7 Durability of WSA-based building and construction materials
    • 22.8 Future trends
  • 23: Sustainability of using waste rubber in concrete
    • Abstract
    • 23.1 Introduction
    • 23.2 Properties of rubber aggregates
    • 23.3 Fresh rubberized concrete properties
    • 23.4 Mechanical properties of rubberized concrete
    • 23.5 Physical properties of rubberized concrete
    • 23.6 Durability properties of rubberized concretes
    • 23.7 Use of mineral additives in rubberized concrete
    • 23.8 Utilization of waste rubber in construction applications
    • 23.9 Future trends
  • 24: Sustainability of sewage sludge in construction
    • Abstract
    • 24.1 Introduction
    • 24.2 Raw sewage sludge
    • 24.3 RSS treatment
    • 24.4 Sewage-sludge production and management
    • 24.5 Sewage-sludge utilisation in construction and civil engineering applications
    • 24.6 Future trends
  • 25: Sustainability of gypsum products as a construction material
    • Abstract
    • 25.1 Introduction
    • 25.2 Types of gypsum products
    • 25.3 Sustainability aspects
    • 25.4 Future trends
    • 25.5 Sources of further information
    • Appendix Standards for gypsum products
  • 26: Sustainability of desulphurised (FGD) waste in construction
    • Abstract
    • 26.1 Introduction
    • 26.2 Desulphurisation processes
    • 26.3 Chemical composition, evaluation, and classification
    • 26.4 Influence of FGD on concrete properties
    • 26.5 Application in the construction industry
    • 26.6 Sustainability of desulphurised (FGD) waste in construction
    • 26.7 Future trends
  • 27: Conclusion
  • Index

Description

Sustainability of Construction Materials, Second Edition, explores an increasingly important aspect of construction. In recent years, serious consideration has been given to environmental and societal issues in the manufacturing, use, disposal, and recycling of construction materials.

This book provides comprehensive and detailed analysis of the sustainability issues associated with these materials, mainly in relation to the constituent materials, processing, recycling, and lifecycle environmental impacts.

The contents of each chapter reflect the individual aspects of the material that affect sustainability, such as the preservation and repair of timber, the use of cement replacements in concrete, the prevention and control of metal corrosion and the crucial role of adhesives in wood products.

Key Features

  • Provides helpful guidance on lifecycle assessment, durability, recycling, and the engineering properties of construction materials
  • Fully updated to take on new developments, with an additional nineteen chapters added to include natural stone, polymers and plastics, and plaster products
  • Provides essential reading for individuals at all levels who are involved in the construction and selection, assessment and use, and maintenance of materials

Readership

Design and construction engineers, materials scientists and all those involved in selection, assessment, maintenance and use of construction materials.


Details

No. of pages:
742
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081003916
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081009956

About the Editors

Jamal Khatib Editor

Jamal Khatib is a Professsor of Civil Engineering (Construction Materials) in the Faculty of Science and Engineering at the University of Wolverhampton, UK. His research interests are mainly in the area of sustainable construction/structural materials subjected to different environmental conditions, and the use of waste and novel materials in construction applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Civil Engineering (Construction Materials), Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, UK