Structure and Properties of High-Performance Fibers - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081005507, 9780081005514

Structure and Properties of High-Performance Fibers

1st Edition

Editors: Gajanan Bhat
eBook ISBN: 9780081005514
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081005507
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 7th September 2016
Page Count: 438
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Table of Contents

  • The Textile Institute and Woodhead Publishing
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles
  • 1. Introduction to high-performance fibers
  • Part One. High-performance inorganic fibers
    • 2. High-performance PAN-based carbon fibers and their performance requirements
      • 2.1. Synthesis of high-performance PAN-based CFs
      • 2.2. Structure and properties of high-performance PAN-based CFs
      • 2.3. Applications of high-performance PAN-based CFs
      • 2.4. Conclusion: strengths and weaknesses of current fiber types
      • 2.5. Future trends
    • 3. High-performance pitch-based carbon fibers
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Pitch precursors
      • 3.3. Manufacturing of carbon fibers
      • 3.4. Structure and properties
      • 3.5. Applications of high-performance pitch-based carbon fibers
      • 3.6. Conclusion
    • 4. High-performance carbon nanofibers and nanotubes
      • 4.1. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
      • 4.2. Carbon nanotube-based fibers
      • 4.3. CNT yarns
      • 4.4. Carbon nanofibers
      • 4.5. CNF based composite filaments
      • 4.6. Comparison of CNT and CNF properties
      • 4.7. Surface modification and dispersion techniques of CNTs and CNFs for composite applications
      • 4.8. Applications
      • 4.9. Future trends
  • Part Two. High-performance synthetic polymer fibers
    • 5. Liquid crystal aromatic polyester-arylate (LCP) fibers: Structure, properties, and applications
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. LCP polymer development history
      • 5.3. LCP polymer synthesis
      • 5.4. LCP fiber manufacturing
      • 5.5. LCP fiber structure and properties
      • 5.6. LCP fiber applications
      • 5.7. Future trends
      • 5.8. Summary
    • 6. High-performance rigid-rod polymer fibers
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Synthesis of rigid-rod polymers
      • 6.3. Spinning of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) fibers
      • 6.4. Structure and properties of rigid-rod fibers
      • 6.5. Modification of rigid-rod fibers
      • 6.6. Applications of rigid-rod fibers
      • 6.7. Concluding remarks
    • 7. High performance polyethylene fibers
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Processing of high-performance polyethylene fibers
      • 7.3. Hierarchical structure of high-performance polyethylene fibers
      • 7.4. Applications of high-performance polyethylene fibers
      • 7.5. Conclusion: strengths and weaknesses—the state of the art
      • 7.6. Future trends
      • Sources of further information and advice
    • 8. High-modulus polypropylene fibers—through postspinning operations
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Synthesis of high-performance polypropylene fibers
      • 8.3. Structure and properties of high-performance polypropylene fibers
      • 8.4. Applications of high-performance polypropylene fibers
      • 8.5. Conclusion: strengths and weaknesses of current fiber types
      • 8.6. Future trends
    • 9. High-performance nylon fibers
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Production of high-performance nylon fibers
      • 9.3. Structure and properties of high-performance nylon fibers
      • 9.4. Applications of high-performance nylon fibers
      • 9.5. Conclusions and future trends
    • 10. High performance fibers from aramid polymers
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Polymer preparation of aramid fibers
      • 10.3. Structure and properties
      • 10.4. Surface modification of aramid fibers
      • 10.5. Applications
      • 10.6. Conclusion
    • 11. Electrospun nanofibers
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Electrospinning
      • 11.3. Morphology of electrospun nanofibers
      • 11.4. Applications of electrospun nanofibers
      • 11.5. Outlook
    • 12. High performance polyimide fibers
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. One-step method for polyimide synthesis
      • 12.3. Two-step method for polyimide synthesis
      • 12.4. Applications of polyimide fibers
      • 12.5. Conclusion
  • Part Three. High-performance natural fibers
    • 13. Silk from silkworms and spiders as high-performance fibers
      • 13.1. Introduction to silks from silkworms
      • 13.2. Introduction to sericulture
      • 13.3. Types of silk and their importance
      • 13.4. High-performance requirements for silk
      • 13.5. Synthesis of silk fibers from silkworms
      • 13.6. Silk reeling and silk fiber manufacture
      • 13.7. Silk reeling (cocoon sorting, cocoon stifling, cocoon riddling, cocoon cooking, etc.)
      • 13.8. Types of silk-reeling machines
      • 13.9. Structure and properties of silk from silkworms for high-performance requirements
      • 13.10. Cross-sectional view
      • 13.11. Amino acid composition
      • 13.12. Spider silk: synthesis, structure, and properties
      • 13.13. Applications of high-performance silk fibers
      • 13.14. Summary
      • 13.15. Future trends
    • 14. Wool as a high-performance fiber
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Structure and properties of the wool fiber
      • 14.3. Fiber modification to improve performance
      • 14.4. Conclusion: strengths and weaknesses
      • 14.5. Future trends
      • Sources of further information and advice
  • Index

Description

Structure and Properties of High-Performance Fibers explores the relationship between the structure and properties of a wide range of high-performance fibers. Part I covers high-performance inorganic fibers, including glasses and ceramics, plus carbon fibers of various types. In Part II, high-performance synthetic polymer fibers are discussed, while Part III reviews those natural fibers that can be used to create advanced textiles. The high-performance properties of these fibers are related to their chemistry and morphology, as well as the ways in which they are synthesized and spun.

High-performance fibers form the basis of textile materials with applications in protection, medicine, and composite reinforcement. Fibers are selected for these technical applications due to their advanced physical, mechanical, and chemical properties.

Key Features

  • Offers up-to-date coverage of new and advanced materials for the fiber and textile industries
  • Reviews structure-property relationships of high-performance inorganic, carbon, synthetic polymer, and natural fibers
  • Includes contributions from an international team of authors edited by an expert in the field
  • Reviews those natural fibers that can be used to create advanced textiles

Readership

Industry professionals, academic researchers and postgraduate students working in the field of fiber science.


Details

No. of pages:
438
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081005514
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081005507

About the Editors

Gajanan Bhat Editor

Dr Gajanan Bhat has over 30 years’ experience of textiles research in both industry and academia. He is currently Department Head of Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors, and Georgia Athletic Association Professor of Fibers and Textiles at the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA. Professor Bhat has published more than 125 original research papers, has three US Patents to his credit, and has been a Fellow of the Textiles Institute since 2005.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department Head, Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA