Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

Techniques and Applications

1st Edition - December 4, 2021

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  • Editors: Ji-Xin Cheng, Wei Min, Yasuyuki Ozeki, Dario Polli
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323851589
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323903370

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Description

Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy: Techniques and Applications describes innovations in instrumentation, data science, chemical probe development, and various applications enabled by a state-of-the-art stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope. Beginning by introducing the history of SRS, this book is composed of seven parts in depth including instrumentation strategies that have pushed the physical limits of SRS microscopy, vibrational probes (which increased the SRS imaging functionality), data science methods, and recent efforts in miniaturization. This rapidly growing field needs a comprehensive resource that brings together the current knowledge on the topic, and this book does just that. Researchers who need to know the requirements for all aspects of the instrumentation as well as the requirements of different imaging applications (such as different types of biological tissue) will benefit enormously from the examples of successful demonstrations of SRS imaging in the book. Led by Editor-in-Chief Ji-Xin Cheng, a pioneer in coherent Raman scattering microscopy, the editorial team has brought together various experts on each aspect of SRS imaging from around the world to provide an authoritative guide to this increasingly important imaging technique. This book is a comprehensive reference for researchers, faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and engineers.

Key Features

  • Includes every aspect from theoretic reviews of SRS spectroscopy to innovations in instrumentation and current applications of SRS microscopy
  • Provides copious visual elements that illustrate key information, such as SRS images of various biological samples and instrument diagrams and schematics
  • Edited by leading experts of SRS microscopy, with each chapter written by experts in their given topics

Readership

Researchers, faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and engineers interested in SRS technology/imaging; chemists and biomedical scientists in industry. Can be used as a reference for a graduate level course

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Foreword
  • References
  • Part 1: Theory
  • Chapter 1: Coherent Raman scattering processes
  • Abstract
  • 1.1: Introduction
  • 1.2: Molecular resonances
  • 1.3: Molecular vibrational resonances
  • 1.4: The CARS process
  • 1.5: The SRS process
  • 1.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Sensitivity and noise in SRS microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: Definitions and laser intensity noise model
  • 2.3: Low-noise SRS detection through lock-in amplification
  • 2.4: Shot-noise-limited SNR in SRS, CARS, and spontaneous Raman scattering: A comparison
  • 2.5: Conclusion
  • Appendix
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Stimulated Raman scattering: Ensembles to single molecules
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: The birth and evolution of stimulated Raman scattering
  • 3.2: Probing molecules with SRS spectroscopy
  • 3.3: Probing smaller samples: The transition to microscopy
  • 3.4: From ensembles to single molecules
  • References
  • Further readings
  • Part 2: Advanced Instrumentation and emerging modalities
  • Chapter 4: Hyperspectral SRS imaging via spectral focusing
  • Abstract
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Principles of spectral focusing SRS
  • 4.3: Implementation of spectral focusing SRS
  • 4.4: Improving the speed of spectral focusing SRS
  • 4.5: Improving the spectral resolution and spectral coverage of spectral focusing SRS
  • 4.6: Variations of spectral focusing SRS
  • 4.7: Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Balanced detection SRS microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 5.1: Introduction
  • 5.2: Balanced detection
  • 5.3: Modulation transfer and lock-in amplification
  • 5.4: Beyond balanced detection
  • 5.5: Auto-balanced detection (ABD)
  • 5.6: In-line balanced detection (IBD)
  • 5.7: Dual-color spectral-focusing IBD
  • 5.8: Collinear balanced detection
  • 5.9: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Multiplex stimulated Raman scattering microscopy via a tuned amplifier
  • Abstract
  • 6.1: Introduction
  • 6.2: Resonant circuit
  • 6.3: Tuned amplifier
  • 6.4: Spectral multiplexing
  • 6.5: Spatial multiplexing
  • 6.6: Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Impulsive SRS microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 7.1: Introduction
  • 7.2: Requirements for impulsive excitation and detection
  • 7.3: Schemes
  • 7.4: Implementations of impulsive Raman microscopy
  • 7.5: Resonant effects
  • 7.6: Impulsive multidimensional spectroscopy
  • 7.7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Multicolor SRS imaging with wavelength-tunable/switchable lasers
  • Abstract
  • 8.1: Introduction
  • 8.2: Multicolor SRS imaging with a high-speed wavelength-tunable laser
  • 8.3: Multicolor SRS imaging with a wavelength-switchable laser
  • 8.4: Discussions
  • 8.5: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Pulse-shaping-based SRS spectral imaging and applications
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Principle of pulse shaping
  • 9.3: Methods of SRS spectral imaging based on pulse shaping
  • 9.4: Applications of pulse-shaping-based SRS imaging
  • 9.5: Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Background-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging by manipulating photons in the spectral domain
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 10.1: Introduction
  • 10.2: Principle
  • 10.3: Removing the non-Raman background in SRS imaging
  • 10.4: Enabling applications by background-free SRS imaging
  • 10.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Coherent Raman scattering microscopy for superresolution vibrational imaging: Principles, techniques, and implementations
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: SSRS microscopy [9, 10]
  • 11.3: HO-CARS microscopy [8]
  • 11.4: Discussion and outlook
  • 11.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Quantum-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering
  • Abstract
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: The process of SRS
  • 12.3: Advancing SRS beyond the shot-noise limit
  • 12.4: Noise sources in SRS spectroscopy
  • 12.5: Experimental test of quantum-enhanced SRS
  • 12.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Stimulated Raman excited fluorescence (SREF) microscopy: Combining the best of two worlds
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: Pioneering work of double-resonance fluorescence spectroscopy
  • 13.3: Realization of stimulated Raman excited fluorescence in 2019
  • 13.4: Main physical considerations
  • 13.5: Remaining technical challenges
  • 13.6: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Instrumentation and methodology for volumetric stimulated Raman scattering imaging
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 14.1: Introduction
  • 14.2: Volumetric stimulated Raman scattering imaging by projection tomography
  • 14.3: Volumetric stimulated Raman scattering imaging by tissue clearing
  • 14.4: Volumetric stimulated Raman scattering imaging by remote focusing
  • 14.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 15: SRS flow and image cytometry
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 15.1: Introduction
  • 15.2: Raman flow cytometry and cell sorting
  • 15.3: Coherent Raman scattering flow cytometry
  • 15.4: Stimulated Raman imaging cytometry and cell sorting
  • 15.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Widely and rapidly tunable fiber laser for high-speed multicolor SRS
  • Abstract
  • 16.1: The demand for widely and rapidly tunable fiber-based lasers in coherent Raman imaging
  • 16.2: Different concepts for tunable fiber-based lasers in SRS
  • 16.3: Concept for widely and rapidly tunable fiber-based four-wave mixing
  • 16.4: Rapidly and widely tunable fiber optical parametric oscillator
  • 16.5: Applicability to coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering
  • 16.6: Applicability to stimulated Raman scattering
  • 16.7: Conclusions on widely and rapidly tunable fiber-based lasers in coherent Raman imaging
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Compact fiber lasers for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: High-power picosecond fiber source for coherent Raman microscopy
  • 17.3: All-fiber laser source providing two synchronized ps, narrowband pulse trains for SRS microscopy
  • 17.4: Widely tunable all-fiber laser source based on four-wave mixing
  • 17.5: All-fiber laser source for coherent Raman microscopy based on spectral focusing
  • 17.6: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Synchronized time-lens source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 18.1: Introduction
  • 18.2: Basic principles of the time-lens source
  • 18.3: Experimental realization of the time-lens source
  • 18.4: Basic principles of the synchronized time-lens source
  • 18.5: Experimental realization of the synchronized time-lens source and its performance
  • 18.6: Applications to CRS microscopy and various implementations of the synchronized time-lens source
  • 18.7: Conclusion and perspective
  • References
  • Part 3: Vibrational probes
  • Chapter 19: Spontaneous Raman and SERS microscopy for Raman tag imaging
  • Abstract
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Spontaneous Raman and SERS microscopy
  • 19.3: Introduction of Raman-tag imaging
  • 19.4: Raman-tag cellular analysis by spontaneous Raman microscopy
  • 19.5: Raman-tag sensor for spontaneous Raman microscopy
  • 19.6: Raman-tag cellular analysis by SERS
  • 19.7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Stimulated Raman scattering imaging with small vibrational probes
  • Abstract
  • 20.1: Introduction
  • 20.2: Principle
  • 20.3: Applications
  • 20.4: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Supermultiplexed vibrational imaging: From probe development to biomedical applications
  • Abstract
  • 21.1: Introduction
  • 21.2: Vibrational probe development
  • 21.3: Biomedical applications
  • 21.4: Outlook
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 22: Raman beads for bio-imaging
  • Abstract
  • 22.1: Introduction
  • 22.2: Principle
  • 22.3: Methods
  • 22.4: Results
  • 22.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 23.1: Introduction
  • 23.2: Principle of plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering
  • 23.3: Experimental system for PESRS measurements
  • 23.4: Line shapes of PESRS spectra
  • 23.5: From ensembles to single molecules
  • 23.6: PESRS versus PECARS
  • 23.7: Outlook
  • References
  • Part 4: Data science
  • Chapter 24: Converting hyperspectral SRS into chemical maps
  • Abstract
  • 24.1: Introduction
  • 24.2: Unsupervised methods
  • 24.3: Supervised methods
  • 24.4: Conclusions and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Compressive Raman microspectroscopy
  • Abstract
  • 25.1: Introduction to the compressive microspectroscopy framework
  • 25.2: Compressive SRS microspectroscopy
  • 25.3: Beyond SRS: Compressive microspectroscopy in spontaneous Raman and CARS
  • 25.4: Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Denoise SRS images
  • Abstract
  • 26.1: Introduction
  • 26.2: Denoise spectroscopic images by PCA
  • 26.3: Denoise by spectral total variation
  • 26.4: Denoise by the deep learning algorithm
  • 26.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Part 5: Applications to life science and materials science
  • Chapter 27: Use of SRS microscopy for imaging drugs
  • Abstract
  • 27.1: Introduction
  • 27.2: Cancer therapeutics
  • 27.3: Dermatological drugs
  • 27.4: Drug formulations and delivery systems
  • 27.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 28: Isotope-probed SRS (ip-SRS) imaging of metabolic dynamics in living organisms
  • Abstract
  • 28.1: Introduction
  • 28.2: DO-SRS imaging of metabolic dynamics in living organisms
  • 28.3: Spectral tracing of deuterium (STRIDE) for SRS imaging of glucose metabolism in mice
  • 28.4: Volumetric clearing-enhanced SRS imaging
  • 28.5: SRS imaging of protein metabolism in mice via intracarotid injection of D-AA
  • 28.6: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 29: Rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility by SRS single-cell metabolic imaging
  • Abstract
  • 29.1: Introduction
  • 29.2: Rapid AST in bacteria by SRS imaging of glucose-d7 incorporation
  • 29.3: Rapid AST in bacteria by SRS imaging of D2O incorporation
  • 29.4: Rapid AST in fungi by SRS imaging of de novo lipogenesis
  • 29.5: Conclusion and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 30: Stimulated Raman scattering imaging of cancer metabolism: New avenue to precision medicine
  • Abstract
  • 30.1: Introduction
  • 30.2: Deciphering cancer metabolism by SRS microscopy
  • 30.3: Deciphering drug metabolism in cancer by SRS microscopy
  • 30.4: SRS microscopy opens new avenue to precision diagnosis of cancer
  • 30.5: SRS microscopy opens new avenue to precision treatment of cancer
  • 30.6: Concluding remarks and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 31: Biomedical applications of SRS microscopy in functional genetics and genomics
  • Abstract
  • 31.1: Introduction
  • 31.2: Principle
  • 31.3: Methods and results
  • 31.4: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 32: Stimulated Raman voltage imaging for quantitative mapping of membrane potential
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 32.1: Introduction
  • 32.2: Principle
  • 32.3: Methods
  • 32.4: Applications
  • 32.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 33: Neurodegenerative disease by SRS microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 33.1: ALS disease
  • 33.2: Alzheimer’s disease
  • 33.3: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 34: Applications of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy in materials science
  • Abstract
  • 34.1: Introduction
  • 34.2: Application of the SRS microscopy in materials science
  • 34.3: Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 35: Resolving molecular orientation by polarization-sensitive stimulated Raman scattering microscopy
  • Abstract
  • 35.1: Introduction
  • 35.2: Principle of polarization-sensitive SRS microscopy
  • 35.3: A polarization-sensitive hyperspectral SRS microscope
  • 35.4: Recent applications of polarization-sensitive SRS microscopy
  • 35.5: AmB orientation in single fungal cell membrane resolved by polarization-sensitive SRS microscopy
  • 35.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 6: Miniaturization and translation to medicine
  • Chapter 36: Stimulated Raman histology
  • Abstract
  • 36.1: Introduction: Gold standard of cancer diagnosis—Histology
  • 36.2: Principle: How can SRS microscopy be used to supplement/improve histology
  • 36.3: Methods
  • 36.4: Results: Comparison of standard and SRS histology
  • 36.5: Outlook
  • 36.6: Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 37: Miniaturized handheld stimulated Raman scattering microscope
  • Abstract
  • 37.1: Introduction
  • 37.2: Challenges in miniaturization of SRS microscope
  • 37.3: A state-of-the-art handheld SRS microscope and its performance
  • 37.4: Applications of handheld SRS microscope
  • 37.5: Outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 38: Intraoperative multimodal imaging
  • Abstract
  • 38.1: Introduction
  • 38.2: Optical imaging
  • 38.3: Summary
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 610
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: December 4, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323851589
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323903370

About the Editors

Ji-Xin Cheng

Dr. Ji-Xin Cheng attended University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) from 1989 to 1994. He carried out his PhD study on bond-selective chemistry at USTC. As a graduate student, he worked as a research assistant at Universite Paris-sud on vibrational spectroscopy and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) on quantum dynamics theory. After postdoctoral training on ultrafast spectroscopy at HKUST, he joined Sunney Xie’s group at Harvard University as a postdoc and worked on the development of CARS microscopy. Cheng joined Purdue University as Assistant Professor in 2003, promoted to Associate Professor in 2009 and Full Professor in 2013. He joined Boston University as the Inaugural Theodore Moustakas Chair Professor in Photonics and Optoelectronics in 2017. For his pioneering contributions to the chemical imaging field, Cheng received the 2020 Pittsburg Spectroscopy Award, the 2019 Ellis R. Lippincott Award, and the 2015 Craver Award.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Boston University, Boston, USA

Wei Min

Dr. Wei Min graduated from Peking University in 2003. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2008 studying single-molecule biophysics with Prof. Sunney Xie. After continuing his postdoctoral work in the Xie group, Dr. Min joined the faculty at Columbia University in 2010 and was promoted to Full Professor there in 2017. Dr. Min’s current research interests focus on developing novel optical spectroscopy and microscopy technology to address biomedical problems. His group has made important contributions to the development of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy and its broad application in biomedical imaging. Dr. Min’s contribution has been recognized by a number of honors, including Scientific Achievement Award from Royal Microscopical Society (2021), Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award (2019), Coblentz Award of Molecular Spectroscopy (2017), ACS Early Career Award in Experimental Physical Chemistry (2017), and NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (2012).

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Chemistry, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, USA

Yasuyuki Ozeki

Dr. Yasuyuki Ozeki received B.S., M.S. and Dr. Eng. Degrees in Electronic Engineering from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1999, 2001, and 2004, respectively. In 2004, he joined Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., as a postdoctoral researcher of Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). In 2006, he joined Department of Material and Life Science, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, as an assistant professor. From 2009 to 2013, he was also PRESTO researcher of JST. In 2013, he was appointed as an Associate Professor of Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, and was promoted to a Full Professor in 2021. His work covers millimeter-wave photonics, nonlinear fiber optics, ultrafast lasers, and their application to microprocessing and biomedical microscopy. His current research focuses on biomedical imaging by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, and its related technologies including highly functional ultrafast laser sources, detection electronics, image processing, etc.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Dario Polli

Dario Polli is Associate Professor of Physics at Politecnico di Milano (Italy) since 2014, where he is heading a research group of more than 10 people including post-docs, Ph.D. and diploma students. He is affiliated with the Center for Nano Science and Technology of the Italian Institute of Technology in Milan, Italy. His main research focus is on coherent Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, ultrafast and non-linear optics, Fourier-transform spectroscopy and time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy and microscopy. He is the recipient of many research grants, including an ERC Consolidator grant on the development of high-speed broadband coherent Raman microscopy for fast and reliable tumour identification. He also devotes to technology transfer: he filed several patents and has founded two start-up companies in the field of photonics. Finally, he is passionate about Science divulgation to the public.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

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