Description

This convenient, bench-top manual highlights typical preparative methods for a wide range of polymer types. The Sourcebook emphasizes practical laboratory procedures for a selection of syntheses that are representative of a given class of starting materials and polymerization techniques. The choice of material reflects the extensive industrial experience of the authors, saves on tedious literature searching when planning laboratory procedures, and includes specific laboratory directions that can be used as models for many related preparations.

Key Features

@introbul:Key Features @bul:* Represents a"cookbook"in the best sense of the term * Reflects the practical, industrial experience of the authors in the selection of materials * Includes an extensive section on the methodology of emulsion polymerization * Presents preparative examples that can be used as models for many related syntheses

Readership

Graduate students and professionals in polymer chemistry, materials scientists, and chemical engineering, as well as biomaterials specialists..

Table of Contents

Polymerization of Styrene and Other Olefins. Polyesters. Polycarbonates. Polyamides. Polymerization of Aldehydes. Polymerization of Epoxides and Cyclic Ethers. Polyureas. Polyurethanes. Thermally Stable Polymers. Polymerizationof Acrylic Monomers. Amino Resins. Phenol-Aldehyde Condensations. Epoxy Resins. Alkyd Resins. Polyacetal and Poly (vinyl acetals). Poly (vinyl ethers). Poly (N-Vinylpyrrolidone). Silicone Resins (Polyorganosiloxanes or Silicones). Olefin-Sulfur Dioxide Copolymers. Sulfide Polymers. Polymerization of Mono- and Diisocyanates. Polyoxyalkyation of Hydroxy Compounds. Polymerization of Vinyl Esters. Polymerization of Allyl Esters. Poly (vinyl alcohol). Introductory Notes on Emulsion Polymerization Techniques.Index.

Details

No. of pages:
283
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 1998
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Print ISBN:
9780126186055
Electronic ISBN:
9780080925592

Reviews

@qu:"....The book is a convenient source for synthetic procedures and should be widely used for both graduate students and industrial chemists. It is concisely written and concentrates on the really important aspects....it not only provides laboratory preparations of most of the important technical polymers, but may also be used as a source of models to guide related polymer preparations. The reasonable price is a further reason that might favor its broad distribution." @source:--Bernd Tieke, University of Koln (Germany) @qu:"The book should be on the bookshelf (and the bench!) of anyone involved, or likely to becomeinvolved, in synthesising polymers." @source:--Barry Hunt, CHEMISTRY IN BRITAIN, May 1999.