Soil Mechanics - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128044919, 9780128014844

Soil Mechanics

1st Edition

Calculations, Principles, and Methods

Authors: Victor Kaliakin
eBook ISBN: 9780128014844
Paperback ISBN: 9780128044919
Imprint: Butterworth-Heinemann
Published Date: 26th January 2017
Page Count: 462
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Description

Soil Mechanics: Calculations, Principles, and Methods provides expert insights into the nature of soil mechanics through the use of calculation and problem-solving techniques. This informed reference begins with basic principles and calculations, illustrating physical meanings of the unit weight of soil, specific gravity, water content, void ratio, porosity, saturation, and their typical values.

This is followed by calculations that illustrate the need for soil identification, classification, and ways to obtain soil particle size distribution, including sizes smaller than 0.075mm, performance, and the use of liquid and plastic limit tests. The book goes on to provide expert coverage regarding the use of soil identification and classification systems (both Unified Soil Classification System and AASHTO), and also includes applications concerning soil compaction and field applications, hydraulic conductivity and seepage, soil compressibility and field application, and shear strength and field application.

Key Features

  • Presents common methods used for calculating soil relationships
  • Covers soil compressibility and field application and calculations
  • Includes soil compaction and field application calculations
  • Provides shear strength and field application calculations
  • Includes hydraulic conductivity and seepage calculations

Readership

Civil Engineers, Geotechnical Engineers Structural Engineers, and Earthquake Engineers

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1. Example Problems Involving Phase Relations for Soils
    • 1.0. General Comments
    • 1.1. General Definitions
    • 1.2. Mass Densities
    • 1.3. Unit Weights
    • 1.4. Definition of Fundamental Quantities
    • 1.5. Relations Derived From Fundamental Quantities
    • Example Problem 1.1
    • Example Problem 1.2
    • Example Problem 1.3
    • Example Problem 1.4
    • Example Problem 1.5
    • Example Problem 1.6
    • Example Problem 1.7
    • Example Problem 1.8
    • Example Problem 1.9
    • Example Problem 1.10
    • Example Problem 1.11
    • Example Problem 1.12
    • Example Problem 1.13
    • Example Problem 1.14
    • Example Problem 1.15
    • Example Problem 1.16
    • Example Problem 1.17
    • Example Problem 1.18
    • Example Problem 1.19
    • Example Problem 1.20
    • Example Problem 1.21
    • Example Problem 1.22
    • Example Problem 1.23
    • Example Problem 1.24
  • Chapter 2. Example Problems Related to Soil Identification and Classification
    • 2.0. General Comments
    • 2.1. Particle Sizes
    • 2.2. Distribution of Grain Sizes
    • 2.3. Plasticity of Soil
    • 2.4. Atterberg Limits
    • 2.5. Soil Classification
    • Example Problem 2.1
    • Example Problem 2.2
    • Example Problem 2.3
    • Example Problem 2.4
    • Example Problem 2.5
    • Example Problem 2.6
    • Example Problem 2.7
    • Example Problem 2.8
    • Example Problem 2.9
    • Example Problem 2.10
    • Example Problem 2.11
    • Example Problem 2.12
    • Example Problem 2.13
    • Example Problem 2.14
    • Example Problem 2.15
    • Example Problem 2.16
    • Example Problem 2.17
  • Chapter 3. Example Problems Related to Compaction of Soils
    • 3.0. General Comments
    • 3.1. Fundamental Definitions
    • Example Problem 3.1
    • Example Problem 3.2
    • Example Problem 3.3
    • Example Problem 3.4
    • Example Problem 3.5
    • Example Problem 3.6
    • Example Problem 3.7
    • Example Problem 3.8
    • Example Problem 3.9
    • Example Problem 3.10
    • Example Problem 3.11
    • Example Problem 3.12
    • Example Problem 3.13
    • Example Problem 3.14
    • Example Problem 3.15
  • Chapter 4. Stresses, Strains, and Elastic Response of Soils
    • 4.0. Introductory Comments
    • 4.1. General Definitions
    • 4.2. Concept of Stress
    • 4.3. Deformation and Strain
    • 4.4. Constitutive Relations
    • 4.5. Stresses in Soil Due to Surface Loads
    • 4.6. Superposition Principle
    • Example Problem 4.1
    • Example Problem 4.2
    • Example Problem 4.3
    • Example Problem 4.4
    • Example Problem 4.5
    • Example Problem 4.6
    • Example Problem 4.7
    • Example Problem 4.8
    • Example Problem 4.9
    • Example Problem 4.10
    • Example Problem 4.11
    • Example Problem 4.12
    • Example Problem 4.13
    • Example Problem 4.14
    • Example Problem 4.15
    • Example Problem 4.16
    • Example Problem 4.17
    • Example Problem 4.18
    • Example Problem 4.19
    • Example Problem 4.20
  • Chapter 5. Example Problems Involving In Situ Stresses Under Hydrostatic Conditions
    • 5.0. General Comments
    • 5.1. Surface Tension
    • 5.2. Capillary Phenomena in Tubes
    • 5.3. Capillary Phenomena in Soils
    • 5.4. In Situ Stresses in Soils Under Hydrostatic Conditions
    • 5.5. Relationship Between Horizontal and Vertical Stresses
    • Example Problem 5.1
    • Example Problem 5.2
    • Example Problem 5.3
    • Example Problem 5.4
    • Example Problem 5.5
    • Example Problem 5.6
    • Example Problem 5.7
    • Example Problem 5.8
    • Solution
    • Example Problem 5.9
    • Solution
    • Example Problem 5.10
  • Chapter 6. Example Problems Involving One-Dimensional Fluid Flow in Soils
    • 6.0. General Comments
    • 6.1. Conservation of Mass
    • 6.2. Bernoulli's Energy Equation
    • 6.3. Head Loss
    • 6.4. Hydraulic Gradient
    • 6.5. Seepage Velocity
    • 6.6. Darcy's Law
    • 6.7. Experimental Determination of Permeability
    • 6.8. Hydrostatic Conditions Compared to Upward and Downward Seepage
    • 6.9. Seepage Forces
    • 6.10. Critical Hydraulic Gradient for Upward Seepage
    • 6.11. One-Dimensional Seepage Through Anisotropic Soil Strata
    • Example Problem 6.1
    • Example Problem 6.2
    • Example Problem 6.3
    • Example Problem 6.4
    • Example Problem 6.5
    • Example Problem 6.6
    • Example Problem 6.7
    • Example Problem 6.8
    • Example Problem 6.9
    • Example Problem 6.10
    • Example Problem 6.11
    • Example Problem 6.12
    • Example Problem 6.13
    • Example Problem 6.14
    • Example Problem 6.15
    • Example Problem 6.16
    • Example Problem 6.17
    • Example Problem 6.18
    • Example Problem 6.19
    • Example Problem 6.20
    • Example Problem 6.21
    • Example Problem 6.22
    • Example Problem 6.23
  • Chapter 7. Example Problems Involving Two-Dimensional Fluid Flow in Soils
    • 7.0. General Comments
    • 7.1. Basic Assumptions
    • 7.2. Governing Equation
    • 7.3. Boundary Conditions
    • 7.4. Solution of the Governing Equation
    • 7.5. Flow Nets
    • 7.6. Rate of Flow Through Flow Nets
    • Example Problem 7.1
    • Example Problem 7.2
    • Example Problem 7.3
  • Chapter 8. Example Problems Related to Compressibility and Settlement of Soils
    • 8.0. General Comments
    • 8.1. Deformation
    • 8.2. Compressibility of Soils
    • 8.3. Settlement
    • 8.4. Quantifying Soil Compressibility
    • 8.5. Preconsolidation Pressure
    • 8.6. Coefficient of Compressibility
    • 8.7. Ultimate Primary Consolidation Settlement
    • 8.8. Coefficient of Volume Compressibility, Modified Compression, and Swell Indices
    • Example Problem 8.1
    • Example Problem 8.2
    • Example Problem 8.3
    • Example Problem 8.4
    • Example Problem 8.5
    • Example Problem 8.6
    • Example Problem 8.7
    • Example Problem 8.8
    • Example Problem 8.9
    • Example Problem 8.10
    • Example Problem 8.11
    • Example Problem 8.12
    • Example Problem 8.13
  • Chapter 9. Example Problems Related to Time Rate of Consolidation
    • 9.0. General Comments
    • 9.1. Fundamental Definitions
    • 9.2. Terzaghi's One-Dimensional Consolidation Theory
    • Example Problem 9.1
    • Example Problem 9.2
    • Example Problem 9.3
    • Example Problem 9.4
    • Example Problem 9.5
    • Example Problem 9.6
    • Example Problem 9.7
    • Example Problem 9.8
    • Example Problem 9.9
    • Example Problem 9.10
    • Example Problem 9.11
    • Example Problem 9.12
    • Example Problem 9.13
    • Example Problem 9.14
  • Chapter 10. Example Problems Related to Shear Strength of Soils
    • 10.0. General Comments
    • 10.1. Shear Strength of Soils
    • 10.2. Factors Controlling Shear Strength of Soils
    • 10.3. Volume Change Characteristics
    • 10.4. Importance of Shear Strength of Geomaterials
    • 10.5. Mohr's Failure Criterion
    • 10.6. Mohr–Coulomb Failure Criterion
    • Example Problem 10.1
    • Example Problem 10.2
    • Example Problem 10.3
    • Example Problem 10.4
    • Example Problem 10.5
    • Example Problem 10.6
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
462
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Butterworth-Heinemann 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
eBook ISBN:
9780128014844
Paperback ISBN:
9780128044919

About the Author

Victor Kaliakin

Prof. Kaliakin is a Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware, where he has been on the faculty since 1990. His expertise is in the constitutive modelling of geomaterials and polymeric reinforcement, and in computational geomechanics. For the last 30 years he has performed research related to the simulation of time-dependent response of cohesive soils. Prof. Kaliakin is the author of Approximate Solution Techniques, Numerical Modeling and Finite Element Methods (Dekker, 2002), and has co-authored over 120 other publications. He is currently a member of the editorial board of Geosynthetics International.

Affiliations and Expertise

Geosynthetics International