Software Defined Networks

Software Defined Networks

A Comprehensive Approach

1st Edition - May 23, 2014

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  • Authors: Paul Goransson, Chuck Black
  • eBook ISBN: 9780124166844
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780124166752

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Description

Software Defined Networks discusses the historical networking environment that gave rise to SDN, as well as the latest advances in SDN technology. The book gives you the state of the art knowledge needed for successful deployment of an SDN, including: How to explain to the non-technical business decision makers in your organization the potential benefits, as well as the risks, in shifting parts of a network to the SDN model How to make intelligent decisions about when to integrate SDN technologies in a network How to decide if your organization should be developing its own SDN applications or looking to acquire these from an outside vendor How to accelerate the ability to develop your own SDN application, be it entirely novel or a more efficient approach to a long-standing problem

Key Features

  • Discusses the evolution of the switch platforms that enable SDN
  • Addresses when to integrate SDN technologies in a network
  • Provides an overview of sample SDN applications relevant to different industries
  • Includes practical examples of how to write SDN applications

Readership

Computing and software Engineering professionals, Network and Networking management professionals

Table of Contents

    • Dedication
    • Praise Page
    • List of Figures
    • List of Tables
    • Foreword
    • Preface
      • Suggestions and Corrections
      • About the Authors
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 1. Introduction
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Basic Packet-Switching Terminology
      • 1.2 Historical Background
      • 1.3 The Modern Data Center
      • 1.4 Traditional Switch Architecture
      • 1.5 Autonomous and Dynamic Forwarding Tables
      • 1.6 Can We Increase the Packet-Forwarding IQ?
      • 1.7 Open Source and Technological Shifts
      • 1.8 Organization of this Book
      • References
    • Chapter 2. Why SDN?
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Evolution of Switches and Control Planes
      • 2.2 Cost
      • 2.3 SDN Implications for Research and Innovation
      • 2.4 Data Center Innovation
      • 2.5 Data Center Needs
      • 2.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 3. The Genesis of SDN
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 The Evolution of Networking Technology
      • 3.2 Forerunners of SDN
      • 3.3 Software Defined Networking is Born
      • 3.4 Sustaining SDN Interoperability
      • 3.5 Open Source Contributions
      • 3.6 Legacy Mechanisms Evolve Toward SDN
      • 3.7 Network Virtualization
      • 3.8 May I Please Call My Network SDN?
      • 3.9 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 4. How SDN Works
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Fundamental Characteristics of SDN
      • 4.2 SDN Operation
      • 4.3 SDN Devices
      • 4.4 SDN Controller
      • 4.5 SDN Applications
      • 4.6 Alternate SDN Methods
      • 4.7 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 5. The OpenFlow Specification
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Chapter-Specific Terminology
      • 5.2 OpenFlow Overview
      • 5.3 OpenFlow 1.0 and OpenFlow Basics
      • 5.4 OpenFlow 1.1 Additions
      • 5.5 OpenFlow 1.2 Additions
      • 5.6 OpenFlow 1.3 Additions
      • 5.7 OpenFlow Limitations
      • 5.8 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Alternative Definitions of SDN
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Potential Drawbacks of Open SDN
      • 6.2 SDN via APIs
      • 6.3 SDN via Hypervisor-Based Overlays
      • 6.4 SDN via Opening Up the Device
      • 6.5 Network Functions Virtualization
      • 6.6 Alternatives Overlap and Ranking
      • 6.7 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 7. SDN in the Data Center
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Data Center Definition
      • 7.2 Data Center Demands
      • 7.3 Tunneling Technologies for the Data Center
      • 7.4 Path Technologies in the Data Center
      • 7.5 Ethernet Fabrics in the Data Center
      • 7.6 SDN Use Cases in the Data Center
      • 7.7 Open SDN versus Overlays in the Data Center
      • 7.8 Real-World Data Center Implementations
      • 7.9 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 8. SDN in Other Environments
      • Abstract
      • Consistent Policy Configuration
      • Global Network View
      • 8.1 Wide Area Networks
      • 8.2 Service Provider and Carrier Networks
      • 8.3 Campus Networks
      • 8.4 Hospitality Networks
      • 8.5 Mobile Networks
      • 8.6 In-Line Network Functions
      • 8.7 Optical Networks
      • 8.8 SDN vs. P2P/Overlay Networks
      • 8.9 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Players in the SDN Ecosystem
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Academic Research Institutions
      • 9.2 Industry Research Labs
      • 9.3 Network Equipment Manufacturers
      • 9.4 Software Vendors
      • 9.5 White-Box Switches
      • 9.6 Merchant Silicon Vendors
      • 9.7 Original Device Manufacturers
      • 9.8 Enterprises
      • 9.9 Standards Bodies and Industry Alliances
      • 9.10 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 10. SDN Applications
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Before You Begin
      • 10.2 Reactive versus Proactive Applications
      • 10.3 Analyzing Simple SDN Applications
      • 10.4 A Simple Reactive Java Application
      • 10.5 Background on Controllers
      • 10.6 Using the Floodlight Controller
      • 10.7 Using the OpenDaylight Controller
      • 10.8 Using the Cisco XNC Controller
      • 10.9 Using the Hewlett-Packard Controller
      • 10.10 Switch Considerations
      • 10.11 Creating Network Virtualization Tunnels
      • 10.12 Offloading Flows in the Data Center
      • 10.13 Access Control for the Campus
      • 10.14 Traffic Engineering for Service Providers
      • 10.15 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 11. SDN Open Source
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Chapter-Specific Terminology
      • 11.2 Open Source Licensing Issues
      • 11.3 Profiles of SDN Open Source Users
      • 11.4 OpenFlow Source Code
      • 11.5 Switch Implementations
      • 11.6 Controller Implementations
      • 11.7 SDN Applications
      • 11.8 Orchestration and Network Virtualization
      • 11.9 Simulation, Testing, and Tools
      • 11.10 OpenStack
      • 11.11 Example: Applying SDN Open Source
      • 11.12 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Business Ramifications
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Everything as a Service
      • 12.2 Market Sizing
      • 12.3 Classifying SDN Vendors
      • 12.4 Impact on Incumbent NEMs
      • 12.5 Impact on Enterprise Consumers
      • 12.6 Turmoil in the Networking Industry
      • 12.7 Venture Capital
      • 12.8 Major SDN Acquisitions
      • 12.9 SDN Startups
      • 12.10 Career Disruptions
      • 12.11 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 13. SDN Futures
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Current State of Affairs
      • 13.2 Potential Novel Applications of Open SDN
      • 13.3 Conclusion
      • References
    • Appendix A. Acronyms and Abbreviations
    • Appendix B. Blacklist Application
      • B.1 MessageListener
      • B.2 PacketHandler
      • B.3 FlowManager
    • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 352
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Morgan Kaufmann 2014
  • Published: May 23, 2014
  • Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann
  • eBook ISBN: 9780124166844
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780124166752

About the Authors

Paul Goransson

Paul Goransson
Paul Goransson is Founder and Chairperson of the Elbrys Networks where he currently leads corporate strategy and directs Elbrys' Intellectual Property portfolio. A serial entrepreneur who has led two boot-strap start-up companies through successful acquisitions by industry giants - Qosnetics by Hewlett Packard (1999) and Meetinghouse by Cisco (2006). Paul held senior management positions with Agilent Technology’s Advanced Networks Division and Cisco's Wireless Networking Business UnitPaul co-authored the book “Roaming Securely in 802.11 Networks” as well as numerous articles in technical journals related to computer networking. He is often an invited speaker at technical conferences.

Affiliations and Expertise

SDN entrepreneur and founder of multiple successful startups in the networking domain

Chuck Black

Chuck Black
Chuck Black has over 35 years of experience in the field of computer networking, working in research

and development labs for Hewlett-Packard for most of that time before becoming co-founder of Tallac

Networks, a Software Defined Networking startup. Most recently he has been training engineering

staff and customers of major networking vendors in the areas of developing SDN applications. He has

been the innovator and creator of multiple networking products for HP in the area of Network Access

Control and Security, and holds eleven patents in these areas. Prior to this work, he developed products

in the field of Network Management for HP’s software organization. In the early days of local area

networking, he was author of some of the first network topology discovery applications in the industry.

Black holds a BS and MS in Computer Science from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis

Obispo.

Affiliations and Expertise

Co-founder and Principal Software Architect at Tallac Networks Senior SDN Instructor at SDN Essentials

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