Sensorimotor Rehabilitation - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444635655, 9780444635679

Sensorimotor Rehabilitation, Volume 218

1st Edition

At the Crossroads of Basic and Clinical Sciences

Serial Volume Editors: Numa Dancause Sylvie Nadeau Serge Rossignol
eBook ISBN: 9780444635679
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444635655
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 1st April 2015
Page Count: 470
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Comprehensive assessment of walking function after human spinal cord injury
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Clinical Assessments of Recovery
    • 3 Clinical Neurophysiology
    • 4 Gait Analysis
    • 5 Neural Control of Walking
    • 6 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 2: Translating mechanisms of neuroprotection, regeneration, and repair to treatment of spinal cord injury
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Clinical Intervention
    • 3 Rehabilitation
    • 4 Neuroprotective Strategies
    • 5 Cell-Based Therapies
    • 6 Targeting Neuroregeneration
    • 7 Promoting Plasticity and Regeneration Through Rehabilitation
    • 8 Combinatorial Therapy as the Approach in the Future
    • 9 Conclusion
  • Chapter 3: High-resolution imaging of the central nervous system: how novel imaging methods combined with navigation strategies will advance patient care
    • Abstract
    • Highlights
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Advances in High-resolution Imaging of the Human Brain and Spinal Cord
    • 3 Optical Coherence Tomography
    • 4 Fluorescence-guided Surgery
    • 5 CARS Microscopy
    • 6 Advances in Imaging Atlases
    • 7 Histological/Stain Atlases
    • 8 High-resolution MRI-based Atlases
    • 9 RNA and Subcellular Imaging Atlases
    • 10 Future of Imaging Atlases
    • 11 Clinical Applications
    • 12 Neuronavigation
    • 13 Conclusion
  • Chapter 4: Assessment of transmission in specific descending pathways in relation to gait and balance following spinal cord injury
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Methods
    • 3 Results
    • 4 Discussion
    • 5 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 5: Exciting recovery: augmenting practice with stimulation to optimize outcomes after spinal cord injury
    • Abstract
    • 1 Priming the Nervous System to Improve Responsiveness to Training
    • 2 Hand/arm Impairment After SCI
    • 3 Limitations in Walking Function After SCI
    • 4 Conclusions
  • Chapter 6: Facilitation of descending excitatory and spinal inhibitory networks from training of endurance and precision walking in participants with incomplete spinal cord injury
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Methods
    • 3 Results
    • 4 Discussion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 7: Targeted neuroplasticity for rehabilitation
    • Abstract
    • 1 Targeted Neuroplasticity Induced Through Operant Conditioning
    • 2 Plasticity Associated with Reflex Conditioning
    • 3 Essentials of Operant Conditioning of EMG Responses Produced by Specific CNS Pathways in Humans
    • 4 Functional Impact of Conditioning: Negotiation of Plasticity
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 8: The “beneficial” effects of locomotor training after various types of spinal lesions in cats and rats
    • Abstract
    • 1 Locomotor Training After a Complete Spinal Section
    • 2 Incomplete SCI
    • 3 Training of Skilled Locomotion in Cats
    • 4 Locomotor Training and Changes in Reflexes
    • 5 Locomotor Training in Rodents (Robotic and Manual Training)
    • 6 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 9: Electrophysiological mapping of rat sensorimotor lumbosacral spinal networks after complete paralysis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Methods
    • 3 Implant Fabrication
    • 4 Control Box and Multiplexer Circuit Board Description
    • 5 Head Connector and Intramuscular EMG Electrode Implantation
    • 6 Spinal Cord Transection and Array Implantation
    • 7 Stimulation and Testing Procedures
    • 8 Data Collection and Analysis
    • 9 Results
    • 10 Discussion
    • 11 Incongruity of Clinical and Physiological Assessments of Completeness of Paralysis: Need for the Ability to Record Evoked Potentials from the Spinal Cord
    • 12 Comparison Between Traditional Wired Electrodes and Multielectrode Arrays
    • 13 Neurophysiological Mechanisms and Specific Sensorimotor Integration Impacting Motor Function via the Electrode Array After SCI
    • Conflict of Interest
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 10: The extracellular matrix in plasticity and regeneration after CNS injury and neurodegenerative disease
    • Abstract
    • 1 Promoting CNS Plasticity and Rehabilitation
    • 2 Plasticity, Memory, and Alzheimer's Disease
    • 3 How Do Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans Control Plasticity?
    • 4 Future Directions
    • Conflict of Interest
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 11: Bench to bedside: challenges of clinical translation
    • Abstract
    • 1 Translational Challenges at the Preclinical Development Phase
    • 2 Translational Requirements During Clinical Trial Phases
    • 3 Unique Challenges for SCI Clinical Studies
    • 4 Summary
  • Chapter 12: Restoring motor function with bidirectional neural interfaces
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Bridging Lost Connections
    • 3 Strengthening Weak Synaptic Connections
    • 4 Activity-dependent Intracranial DBS
    • 5 Concluding Comments
  • Chapter 13: Stroke rehabilitation: clinical picture, assessment, and therapeutic challenge
    • Abstract
    • 1 Statistics on Stroke and on Its Consequences
    • 2 Reintegration into the Community Poststroke
    • 3 Recovery After Stroke
    • 4 Stroke Rehabilitation
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 14: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for motor recovery of the upper limb after stroke
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Neural Correlates of Motor Recovery After Stroke
    • 3 Modulation of Cortical Excitability by rTMS
    • 4 rTMS for Motor Recovery After Stroke
    • 5 Methods
    • 6 Results
    • 7 rTMS over the Contralesional Hemisphere in Promoting Motor Recovery of the Affected Hand After Stroke
    • 8 rTMS over the Ipsilesional Hemisphere in Promoting Motor Recovery of the Affected Hand After Stroke
    • 9 Bilateral Stimulation in Promoting Motor Recovery of the Affected Hand after Stroke
    • 10 Comparing Different rTMS Protocols
    • 11 Discussion
    • 12 Stimulation Parameter-Dependent Efficiency
    • 13 Conclusion
  • Chapter 15: Cortical mechanisms underlying sensorimotor enhancement promoted by walking with haptic inputs in a virtual environment
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Light Haptic Touch and Sensorimotor Enhancement of Locomotion
    • 3 Advances in Virtual Reality Technology
    • 4 Sensorimotor Enhancement Revealed by Cortical Mapping
    • 5 Future Directions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 16: Translating the science into practice: shaping rehabilitation practice to enhance recovery after brain damage
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Neuroplasticity Elevates the Importance of Motor Learning
    • 3 From Neuroplasticity to an Integrated Framework for Translation: What Are the Active Ingredients?
    • 4 Active Ingredient #1: Be Challenging
    • 5 Active Ingredient #2: Be Progressive and Optimally Adapted
    • 6 Active Ingredient # 3: solicit Motivation and Active Participation
    • 7 Examples of Promising New Therapies
    • 8 Opportunities and Challenges for Future Translational Research
  • Chapter 17: Inhibition of the contralesional hemisphere after stroke: reviewing a few of the building blocks with a focus on animal models
    • Abstract
    • 1 General Introduction
    • 2 Popular Models of Stroke
    • 3 Interhemispheric Connections
    • 4 Ipsilateral Corticospinal Projections
    • 5 Interhemispheric Interactions in Healthy Adults
    • 6 Changes of Contralesional Hemisphere Excitability After Stroke
    • 7 Contralesional Inhibition After Stroke
    • 8 Can Onset Time and Duration Affect Contralesional Inhibition Efficacy?
    • 9 Contralesional Inhibition Onset Time and Duration in a Rat Model of Cortical Stroke
    • 10 Contralesional Inhibition May Not Always Be Advisable
    • 11 General Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 18: Pathways mediating functional recovery
    • Abstract
    • 1 Cortical Activation
    • 2 The Corticospinal Tract: contralateral Effects
    • 3 The Corticospinal Tract: Ipsilateral Effects
    • 4 The Reticulospinal Tract
    • 5 Spinal Systems for Control of the Hand
    • 6 Different Types of Hand Function
    • 7 Ipsilateral Motor Output
    • 8 Differences Between Rodent and Primate Models
    • 9 Conclusions
  • Chapter 19: Lost in translation: rethinking approaches to stroke recovery
    • Abstract
    • 1 The Problem of Stroke
    • 2 Stroke Prevention and Acute Stroke Treatment
    • 3 The Use of Animal Models to Assess Stroke Recovery
    • 4 The Potential of Neuroplasticity to Enhance Stroke Recovery
    • 5 Exogenous and Endogenous Stem Cell Approaches to Enhance Stroke Recovery
    • 6 Stroke Recovery: what About Cognition?
    • 7 Future Directions: A Holistic Approach to Stroke Recovery
    • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • Other Volumes in Progress in Brain Research

Description

This volume of Progress in Brain Research focuses on Sensorimotor Rehabilitation.

Key Features

  • This well-established international series examines major areas of basic and clinical research within neuroscience, as well as emerging subfields

Readership

Neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists


Details

No. of pages:
470
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444635679
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444635655

About the Serial Volume Editors

Numa Dancause Serial Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Université de Montréal, Canada

Sylvie Nadeau Serial Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Université de Montréal, Canada

Serge Rossignol Serial Volume Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Université de Montréal, Canada