Description

Scientific libraries have undergone dramatic changes since the end of the 1960s. This book explains and characterises these changes and main trends, and describes their consequences for libraries. The book presents an overview and an analysis of long-term developments in the field. Professionals within library and information sciences, together with students, will find the book of interest, enabling them to understand the situation of the libraries today and also prepare them for decisions about the future.

Key Features

  • Summarises the author's unique practical experiences from 35 years of work within the field of library and information sciences
  • Analyses main trends from a holistic and long-term perspective
  • Provides the reader with the tools when trying to plan for and predict the future

Readership

Practitioners and students of Library and Information Science

Table of Contents

Not like the old days – the dawning of a new era: The 1970s; From cards to computers: The 1980s; A decade of optimism: 1990–2000; Harvest time: 2000–2007; The challenges for libraries in the future.

Details

No. of pages:
140
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2008
Published:
Imprint:
Chandos Publishing
Electronic ISBN:
9781780631219
Print ISBN:
9781843342694
Print ISBN:
9781843342687

About the author

Tomas Lidman

Dr. Tomas Lidman is currently leading a National Committee on Literature at the Ministry of Culture in Sweden. Until 2010 he was a national archivist in Sweden, and prior to this he was University Librarian in Stockholm. Dr. Lidman has overseen a variety of endeavours including project-leader in EU, IFLA, UNESCO, and Vice President of ICA (2005-2009). Since 2003 he has held the Presidency of the Royal Institute of Fine Arts in Stockholm and between 1995 and 2003 he was a national librarian. He took his PhD in History in 1979 and has written several books in History, Librarianship and Library history. In 2008 he wrote Scientific Libraries: Past development and future changes, for Chandos.

Reviews

The reader could not have a safer pair of hands to lead libraries on that particular journey., LCR
It is refreshing to read a book with a distinctly European flavour and citing examples of European libraries and developments within the European library field., Library Management
I heartily recommend the book to my colleagues in libraries and in professional education. It is a thoughtful review of modern academic library development written from within, but with the very keen understanding of a knowledgeable outside observer., Information Research