Description

Traditional plant physiological ecology is organism centered and provides a useful framework for understanding the interactions between plants and their environment and for identifying characteristics likely to result in plant success in a particular habitat. This book focuses on extending concepts from plant physiological ecology as a basis for understanding carbon, energy, and biogeochemical cycles at ecosystem, regional, and global levels. This will be a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students in ecology, plant ecophysiology, ecosystem research, biometerology, earth system science, and remote sensing.

Key Features

@introbul:Key Features @bul:* The integration of metabolic activities across spatial scales, from leaf to ecosystem * Global constraints and regional processes * Functional units in ecological scaling * Models and technologies for scaling

Readership

Researchers and graduate students in ecology, plant ecophysiology, ecosystems research, biometerology and remote sensing

Table of Contents

Introduction. Integrating Spatial Patterns: S.A. Levin, Concepts of Scale at the Local Level. D. Schimel, F. Davis, And T. Kittel, Spatial Information for Extrapolation of Canopy Processes: Examples of FIFE. Leaf to Ecosystem Level Integration: J. Norman, Scaling Processes Between Leaf and Canopy Levels. D. Baldocchi, Scaling Water Vapor and Cabon Dioxide Exchange from Leaves to a Canopy: Rules and Tools. P. Jarvis, Prospects for Bottom-Up Models. J.F. Reynolds, D.W. Hilbert, And P.R. Kemp, Scaling Ecophysiology from the Plant to the Ecosystem: A Conceptual Framework. S.W. Running and E.R. Hunt, Jr., Generalization of a Forest Ecosystem Process Model for Other Biomes, Biome-BGC and an Application for Global-Scale Models. R. Waring, How Ecophysiologists Can Scale from Leaves to Landscapes. Global Constraints and Regional Processes: P.M. Vitousek, Global Dynamics and Ecosystem Processes: P.M. Vitousek, Global Dynamics and Ecosystem Processes: Scaling Up or Scaling Down. P. Tans, An Observational Strategy for Assessing the Role of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Global Carbon Cycle: Scaling Down to Regional Levels. P.G. Jarvis and R.C. Dewar, Forests in the Global Carbon Balance from Stand to Region. M.M. Caldwell, P.A. Matson, C.A. Wessman, And J.A. Gamon, Prospects for Scaling. Functional Units in Ecological Scaling: F.A. Bazzaz, Scaling in Biological Systems: Population and Community Perspectives. J. Clark, Scaling at the Population Level: Effects of Species Composkition and Population Structure. F.S. Chapin, III, The Functional Role of Growth Forms in Ecosystem and Global Processes. T.E. Dawson and F.S. Chapin III, Grouping Plants By Their Form-Function Characteristics as an Avenue for Simplification in Scaling Between Leaves and Landscapes. Integrating Technologies for Scaling: D. Yakir, J. Berry, L. Giles, B. Osmond, And R. Thomas, Applications of Stable Isotopes to Scaling Biospheric Photosynthetic Activities. S.L. Ustin, M.O. Smith, And J.B. Adams, Remote Sensing

Details

No. of pages:
388
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 1993
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780323139571
Print ISBN:
9780122334405
Print ISBN:
9780124119598

About the series-volume-editors

James Ehleringer

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, U.S.A.

Christopher Field

Affiliations and Expertise

Carnegie Intitution of Washington, Stanford, California, U.S.A.

Reviews

Traditional plant physiological ecology is organism centered and provides a useful framework for understanding the interactions between plants and their environment and for identifying characteristics likely to result in plant success in a particular habitat. This book focuses on extending concepts from plant physiological ecology as a basis for understanding carbon, energy, and biogeochemical cycles at ecosystem, regional, and global levels. This will be a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students in ecology, plant ecophysiology, ecosystem research, biometerology, earth system science, and remote sensing.