Safe and Secure Transport and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782423096, 9781782423225

Safe and Secure Transport and Storage of Radioactive Materials

1st Edition

Editors: Ken Sorenson
eBook ISBN: 9781782423225
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782423096
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 24th July 2015
Page Count: 360
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Description

Safe and Secure Transport and Storage of Radioactive Materials reviews best practice and emerging techniques in this area. The transport of radioactive materials is an essential operation in the nuclear industry, without which the generation of nuclear power would not be possible. Radioactive materials also often need to be stored pending use, treatment, or disposal. Given the nature of radioactive materials, it is paramount that transport and storage methods are both safe and secure.

A vital guide for managers and general managers in the nuclear power and transport industries, this book covers topics including package design, safety, security, mechanical performance, radiation protection and shielding, thermal performance, uranium ore, fresh fuel, uranium hexafluoride, MOX, plutonium, and more.

Key Features

  • Uniquely comprehensive and systematic coverage of the packaging, transport, and storage of radioactive materials
  • Section devoted to spent nuclear fuels
  • Expert team of authors and editors

Readership

General Managers and R&D Managers in the nuclear transport industry; General Managers and R&D Managers in the nuclear power industry; researchers in academia and governmental organisations working on nuclear transport

Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • 1. Introduction to the packaging, transport and storage of radioactive materials
    • 1.1. Introduction
    • 1.2. Overview of the topic
    • 1.3. Scope of book
  • Part One. Frameworks for operational safety
    • 2. Functional requirements for the design of transport packages
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Future trends in the nuclear industry
      • 2.3. General design features to meet regulatory requirements
      • 2.4. Packaging requirements
      • 2.5. Package design
    • 3. Training in the nuclear transport industry
      • 3.1. Legal requirements
      • 3.2. Training scope (as required by the regulations)
      • 3.3. Training required
      • 3.4. Refresher training
      • 3.5. Other training considerations
      • 3.6. Modal guidance
      • 3.7. Sample syllabus
      • List of abbreviations
    • 4. Public relations for the nuclear transport industry
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Risk perception
      • 4.3. Historical overview
      • 4.4. Security concerns
      • 4.5. Risk communication
      • 4.6. Future trends
      • 4.7. Additional information
    • 5. Risk assessment approaches for the transport of radioactive material
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Routine, incident-free transportation
      • 5.3. Transport accidents in which the radioactive cargo is not damaged
      • 5.4. Transport accidents in which the radioactive cargo is damaged
      • 5.5. Transport accidents in which gamma shielding is lost
      • 5.6. Uncertainty in transport risk assessment
      • 5.7. Summary
    • 6. Responding to emergencies associated with the transport of radioactive material
      • 6.1. Introduction – emergency response: a necessary contribution to transport safety
      • 6.2. Some significant events in radioactive material (RAM) transport – lessons drawn
      • 6.3. Existing international requirements and recommendations – future trends
      • 6.4. Roles and responsibilities for governmental and private, national and local organizations
      • 6.5. Specific instrumentation, equipment and assessment tools needed for response according to transport modes
      • 6.6. Other specific issues for transport emergency response organization: international issues
      • 6.7. Conclusions
      • 6.8. Further information and references
  • Part Two. Package design and performance for transport
    • 7. Structural performance of packages for radioactive materials
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Performance requirements
      • 7.3. From requirements to package layout
      • 7.4. Demonstration of package performance
      • 7.5. Conclusions
    • 8. Thermal performance of transportation packages for radioactive materials
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Basics of heat transfer
      • 8.3. Regulatory aspects
      • 8.4. Heat loads
      • 8.5. Thermal design features
      • 8.6. Materials
      • 8.7. Thermal safety evaluations of the package
      • 8.8. Testing and analysis
      • 8.9. Summary and trends
    • 9. Radiation protection by shielding in packages for radioactive materials
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Design base and safety function of shielding
      • 9.3. Current industrial solutions and overview of shielding materials available
      • 9.4. Future trends, new requirements, and severe conditions
    • 10. Criticality analysis of packages for radioactive materials
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Regulatory requirements
      • 10.3. Factors influencing criticality safety
      • 10.4. Establishing the criteria for criticality safety
      • 10.5. Prediction of keff
      • 10.6. Criticality safety assessments
      • 10.7. Current and future challenges
      • 10.8. Irradiated fuel transport: a case study in reducing conservatism
      • 10.9. Summary
    • 11. Sea transport of irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high-level radioactive wastes
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Regulatory requirements for sea transport
      • 11.3. The INF code
      • 11.4. Cargo stowage and segregation considerations
      • 11.5. Operations
      • 11.6. Emergency planning
      • 11.7. Security
      • 11.8. Nuclear liability
      • 11.9. International relations
      • 11.10. Future trends
      • 11.11. Further information
      • 11.12. Conclusions
  • Part Three. Packaging, transport and storage of particular types of radioactive materials
    • 12. Packaging, transport and storage of uranium ore concentrates and uranium hexafluoride
      • 12.1. Transport of uranium ore concentrates
      • 12.2. Transport of uranium hexafluoride
      • 12.3. Conclusions
    • 13. Packaging and transport of unirradiated uranium dioxide fuel and nonirradiated mixed oxide fuel
      • 13.1. Transport of unirradiated uranium dioxide fuel
      • 13.2. Transport of nonirradiated mixed oxide fuel
      • 13.3. Conclusions
      • Key words and definitions
    • 14. Transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel
      • 14.1. Spent fuel generation and characteristics
      • 14.2. Overview of storage technologies
      • 14.3. Issues of long-term storage
      • 14.4. Long-term containment of metal gaskets for metal casks
      • 14.5. Interaction between transport and storage on containment
      • 14.6. Stress corrosion cracking of the canister for concrete cask
      • 14.7. Holistic approach to assure transport and storage safety of metal cask
    • 15. Packaging, transport, and storage of high-, intermediate-, and low-level radioactive wastes
      • 15.1. Radioactive waste categories
      • 15.2. Transport and storage of high-level waste
      • 15.3. Transport and storage of low-level waste and intermediate-level waste
      • 15.4. Operational experiences with containers for low-level and intermediate-level waste
      • Final remarks
    • 16. Packaging, transport, and storage of large radioactive components
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Swedish perspective
      • 16.3. International perspective
      • 16.4. Packaging for large components and alternative solutions
      • 16.5. Transport of large components
      • 16.6. Storage of large components in general
      • 16.7. International work and cooperation in the field of handling and transporting large radioactive components
      • 16.8. Future trends
      • 16.9. Sources of further information
    • 17. Packaging, transport, and storage of medical and industrial radioactive materials
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Use and transport of radioisotopes for medical purposes
      • 17.3. Transport of sealed sources used in industry and research
      • 17.4. Aspects of transport of special-form and non-special-form radioactive material
      • 17.5. Transport and storage of disused sources
      • 17.6. Additional regulations for high-activity sealed sources
      • 17.7. Denial of shipments in transport of radioactive material
  • Part Four. Long-term storage and subsequent transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste
    • 18. Wet storage of spent nuclear fuel
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Typical US spent-fuel pool and Fukushima
      • 18.3. Aging management for extended long-term storage
      • 18.4. Pool to pad and vacuum drying
      • 18.5. Likely future trends
      • 18.6. Sources of further information and advice
      • 18.7. Conclusions
    • 19. Long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste: strategies and implications for package design
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Overview of spent-fuel storage systems
      • 19.3. Functional requirements and design loadings
      • 19.4. Design implications of storage systems
      • 19.5. High-level waste storage
      • 19.6. Implications for extended storage
      • 19.7. Trends
    • 20. Transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste after long-term storage
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Possible issues resulting from long-term storage
      • 20.3. Aging management
      • 20.4. Storage/transport options
      • 20.5. Disposition options
      • 20.6. Transportation scenarios
      • 20.7. Retrieval of the spent fuel after transportation
      • 20.8. Conclusions
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
360
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782423225
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782423096

About the Editor

Ken Sorenson

Ken Sorenson is the Department Manager of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies at Sandia National Laboratories

Affiliations and Expertise

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ratings and Reviews