Rivers of Europe

Rivers of Europe

2nd Edition - November 10, 2021

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  • Editors: Klement Tockner, Christiane Zarfl, Christopher Robinson
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081026120
  • eBook ISBN: 9780081026137

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Description

Rivers of Europe, Second Edition, presents the latest update on the only primary source of complete and comparative baseline data on the biological and hydrological characteristics of more than 180 of the highest profile rivers in Europe. With even more full-color photographs and maps, the book includes conservation information on current patterns of river use and the extent to which human society has exploited and impacted them. Each chapter includes up to 10 featured rivers, with detailed information on their physiography, hydrology, ecology/biodiversity and human impacts. Rivers selected for specific coverage include the largest, the most natural, and those most affected by humans. This book provides the most comprehensive information ecologists and conservation managers need to better assess their management and meet the EU legislative good governance targets.

Key Features

  • Includes comparison photos of rivers, along with information on the history and management of each river
  • Presents summary information on hydrological, ecological and freshwater biodiversity patterns and trends of each river
  • Highlights environmental issues of great importance to citizens and governments, including fragmentation by dams, pollution, introduction of nonnative species and reductions in biodiversity

Readership

River biologists/ecologists; Geographers; Hydrologists; Local, regional and governmental environmental, river & water resource managers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Editor's biography
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1. Introduction to European rivers
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Biogeographic setting
  • 1.3. Cultural and socioeconomic setting
  • 1.4. Hydrologic and human legacies
  • 1.5. Early and recent human impacts on European rivers
  • 1.6. Temperature and precipitation
  • 1.7. Water availability and runoff
  • 1.8. Riverine floodplains
  • 1.9. River deltas
  • 1.10. Water quality
  • 1.11. Freshwater biodiversity
  • 1.12. Environmental pressures on biodiversity
  • 1.13. Fragmentation
  • 1.14. Water stress
  • 1.15. Land-use change
  • 1.16. Alien (nonnative and exotic) fish species
  • 1.17. The European Water Framework Directive
  • 1.18. Knowledge gaps
  • Chapter 2. The Volga River
  • 2.1. Introduction
  • 2.2. Biogeographical setting
  • 2.3. Physiography and climate
  • 2.4. Geomorphology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry
  • 2.5. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 2.6. Management and conservation
  • 2.7. Major tributeries of the Volga River
  • Chapter 3. The Danube River Basin
  • 3.1. Introduction
  • 3.2. Historical aspects
  • 3.3. Paleogeography and geology
  • 3.4. Geomorphology
  • 3.5. Climate and hydrology
  • 3.6. Biogeochemistry, water quality, and nutrients
  • 3.7. Biodiversity
  • 3.8. Human impacts, conservation, and management
  • 3.9. Major tributaries and the Danube Delta
  • 3.10. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 4. The Iberian rivers
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. The Guadiana River
  • 4.3. The Guadalquivir
  • 4.4. The Duero River
  • 4.5. The Ebro River
  • 4.6. The Tagus River
  • 4.7. The Júcar River
  • 4.8. The Segura River
  • 4.9. The Miño River
  • 4.10. Other Iberian basins
  • 4.11. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 5. Continental Atlantic Rivers: The Meuse, Loire and Adour-Garonne Basins
  • 5.1. Introduction
  • Chapter 6. The Meuse River basin
  • 6.1. Introduction
  • 6.2. Historical perspective
  • 6.3. Geography and geology
  • 6.4. Geomorphology
  • 6.5. Climate and hydrology
  • 6.6. Biogeochemistry, water quality, and ecosystem processes
  • 6.7. Biodiversity
  • 6.8. Human impact, conservation and management
  • 6.9. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 7. The Loire River basin
  • 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. Historical background
  • 7.3. Geology and paleogeography
  • 7.4. Fluvial geomorphology and sedimentology
  • 7.5. Climate and hydrology
  • 7.6. Biogeochemistry, water quality, and ecosystem processes: status and trends
  • 7.7. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 7.8. Management and conservation
  • 7.9. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 8. The Adour-Garonne basin
  • 8.1. Introduction
  • 8.2. Historical perspective
  • 8.3. Biogeographic setting
  • 8.4. Physiography, climate and land use
  • 8.5. Geomorphology, hydrology and biochemistry
  • 8.6. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 8.7. Management and conservation
  • 8.8. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 9. Continental Atlantic Rivers: the Seine Basin
  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. Historical perspective
  • 9.3. Geological and hydrological context
  • 9.4. Modeling tools for the Seine River basin
  • 9.5. Water chemistry and chemical contamination
  • 9.6. Biodiversity, biological compartments
  • 9.7. Biogeochemistry: nutrients and eutrophication
  • 9.8. Human impact, conservation, and management
  • 9.9. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 10. The Rhine River basin
  • 10.1. Introduction
  • 10.2. Historical aspects
  • 10.3. Paleogeography and geology
  • 10.4. Climate and hydrology
  • 10.5. Biogeochemistry, water quality, temperature, and ecosystem processes
  • 10.6. Biodiversity
  • 10.7. Human impacts, conservation, and management
  • 10.8. The major Rhine tributaries
  • 10.9. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 11. The Rhône River Basin
  • 11.1. Introduction
  • 11.2. Biogeographic setting
  • 11.3. Climate and land use
  • 11.4. Geomorphology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry
  • 11.5. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 11.6. Management and conservation
  • 11.7. The Ain River
  • 11.8. The Saône River
  • 11.9. The Durance river
  • 11.10. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 12. The Fennoscandian Shield
  • 12.1. Introduction
  • 12.2. The rivers
  • 12.3. Conclusions and outlook
  • Chapter 13. Arctic rivers
  • 13.1. Introduction
  • 13.2. The Altaelva River
  • 13.3. The Tana River
  • 13.4. The Komagelva River
  • 13.5. The Varzuga River
  • 13.6. The Onega River
  • 13.7. The Northern Dvina River
  • 13.8. The Mezen River
  • 13.9. The Pechora River
  • 13.10. The Kara River
  • 13.11. The Geithellnaá River
  • 13.12. The Laxá River
  • 13.13. The Vestari-Jökulsá River
  • 13.14. The Bayelva River
  • Chapter 14. British and Irish rivers
  • 14.1. Introduction
  • 14.2. Biogeographic setting
  • 14.3. Physiography, climate, and land use
  • 14.4. Geomorphology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry
  • 14.5. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 14.6. Management and conservation
  • 14.7. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 15. Rivers of the Balkans
  • 15.1. Introduction
  • 15.2. Historical perspective
  • 15.3. Major rivers and tributaries
  • 15.4. Biogeographic setting
  • 15.5. Physiography, climate, and land use
  • 15.6. Hydrology and biogeochemistry
  • 15.7. Riparian and aquatic biodiversity
  • 15.8. Management and conservation
  • 15.9. Conclusion and perspective
  • Chapter 16. The Italian rivers
  • 16.1. Introduction
  • 16.2. Biogeographic setting
  • 16.3. Physiography, climate, and land use
  • 16.4. Geomorphology, hydrology, and biochemistry
  • 16.5. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 16.6. Management and conservation
  • 16.7. Conclusion and perspective
  • Chapter 17. The Western Steppic Rivers
  • 17.1. Introduction
  • 17.2. Biogeographic setting
  • 17.3. Physiography, climate, and land use
  • 17.4. Geomorphology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry
  • 17.5. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 17.6. Management and conservation
  • 17.7. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 18. Rivers of the Central European Highlands and Plains
  • 18.1. Introduction
  • 18.2. Weser River
  • 18.3. Elbe
  • 18.4. Oder
  • 18.5. Em
  • 18.6. Skjern
  • 18.7. Spree
  • 18.8. Drawa
  • 18.9. Synopsis
  • Chapter 19. Rivers of the Boreal Uplands
  • 19.1. Introduction
  • 19.2. Physiography, land use, and hydrology
  • 19.3. Aquatic and riparian biodiversity
  • 19.4. Glomma River
  • 19.5. Numedalslågen river
  • 19.6. Mandalselva River
  • 19.7. Suldalslågen River
  • 19.8. Lærdalselva River
  • 19.9. Jostedøla River
  • 19.10. Stryneelva River
  • 19.11. Orkla River
  • 19.12. Namsen river
  • 19.13. Vefsna river
  • 19.14. Conclusions and perspectives
  • Chapter 20. Baltic and Eastern Continental Rivers
  • 20.1. Introduction
  • 20.2. Vistula River
  • 20.3. Biodiversity
  • 20.4. Nemunas River
  • 20.5. Western Dvina River
  • 20.6. Narva River
  • Chapter 21. Rivers of Turkey
  • 21.1. Introduction
  • 21.2. Historical Perspective
  • 21.3. Geology of Turkey
  • 21.4. General characterization of Turkish rivers
  • 21.5. Climate
  • 21.6. Land-use patterns
  • 21.7. Geomorphology of river basins
  • 21.8. Hydrology and temperature
  • 21.9. Water quality
  • 21.10. Biodiversity
  • 21.11. Water Framework Directive (WFD)
  • 21.12. Constructed dams
  • 21.13. Management and conservation
  • Chapter 22. Ural River Basin
  • 22.1. Introduction
  • 22.2. Historical aspects
  • 22.3. Paleogeography and geology
  • 22.4. Geomorphology
  • 22.5. Climate and hydrology: status and trends
  • 22.6. Biogeochemistry, water quality, and ecosystem processes: status and trends
  • 22.7. Biodiversity
  • 22.8. Human impacts, conservation, and management
  • 22.9. Major tributaries
  • 22.10. Conclusions and lessons learnt
  • Chapter 23. European rivers: a personal perspective
  • 23.1. Introduction
  • 23.2. Pressures on European rivers
  • 23.3. Some key impacts of pressures on European rivers
  • 23.4. What to do—management responses
  • 23.5. Closing remarks—science, policy, and management
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 942
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: November 10, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780081026120
  • eBook ISBN: 9780081026137

About the Editors

Klement Tockner

Professor Tockner received a PhD from the University of Vienna. He has special expertise on freshwater biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and river and wetland restoration and management. He has published about 250 scientific papers including more than 180 ISI papers. Klement Tockner has successfully managed large inter- and transdisciplinary projects such as the EC-funded project BioFresh on freshwater biodiversity. He is member of several scientific committees and advisory boards, and elected member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Germany Academy of Sciences, Leopoldina.

Affiliations and Expertise

Director General of the Senckenberg Society for Nature Research and professor for Ecosystem Sciences at Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Christiane Zarfl

Professor Zarfl is an Assistant Professor for Environmental Systems Analysis at the Universität Tübingen, a guest Scientist at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries Berlin and a Co-speaker of the Platform "Environmental System Analytics". Her main research interests are in environmental pollution and infrastructure development especially in freshwater ecosystems. Her research employs mathematical modelling in combination with empirical and experimental data to understand underlying processes and interdependencies.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Geosciences, Centre for Applied Geoscience, Environmental Systems Analysis, Eberhard Karls Universitat Tubingen, Germany

Christopher Robinson

Dr. Robinson is a senior scientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag) and a lecturer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Dübendorf/Zürich in Switzerland. His main interests are in freshwater biodiversity, disturbance ecology, and ecosystem functioning of alpine rivers and streams.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Limnology, EAWAG (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology) and ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Dubendorf/Zurich, Switzerland

Ratings and Reviews

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  • Damon Thu Nov 07 2019

    Very interesting!

    Very interesting!