Renewable Hydrogen Production

Renewable Hydrogen Production

1st Edition - November 26, 2021

Write a review

  • Authors: Ibrahim Dincer, Haris Ishaq
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323851763
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323851893

Purchase options

Purchase options
Available
DRM-free (PDF, EPub)
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Renewable Hydrogen Production provides a comprehensive analysis of renewable energy-based hydrogen production. Through simulation analysis and experimental investigations, the book provides fundamentals, compares existing hydrogen production applications, discusses novel technologies, and offers insights into the future directions of this rapidly evolving industry. This all-in-one resource on how to produce clean hydrogen production to enhance energy efficiency and support sustainable development will appeal to a wide variety of industries and professionals.

Key Features

  • Addresses the production of clean hydrogen from the major sources of renewable energy, including wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, biomass and marine energy
  • Presents information from simulations and experimental analyses
  • Offers insights into the future of renewable hydrogen production

Readership

Researchers, practitioners, and students involved in sustainable and renewable hydrogen production. Graduate-level engineering courses in renewable energy and energy systems

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Preface
  • Nomenclature
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Fuels Utilization
  • 1.2. Hydrogen Properties and Sustainable Development
  • 1.3. Hydrogen Storage
  • 1.4. Hydrogen Infrastructure, Transportation, and Distribution
  • 1.5. Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Applications
  • 1.6. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 2. Hydrogen Production Methods
  • 2.1. Conventional Hydrogen Production Methods
  • 2.2. Renewable Hydrogen Production Methods
  • 2.3. Other Hydrogen Production Methods
  • 2.4. Thermochemical Cycles
  • 2.5. Electrolysis
  • 2.6. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 3. Solar Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 3.1. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production
  • 3.2. Photonic Hydrogen Production
  • 3.3. Solar Photovoltaic Energy
  • 3.4. Solar Thermal Energy
  • 3.5. Solar Thermal Collector
  • 3.6. Photocatalysis
  • 3.7. Thermolysis
  • 3.8. Solar Heliostat
  • 3.9. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 4. Wind Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 4.1. Working Principle and Advantages of Wind Energy
  • 4.2. Types of Wind Turbines
  • 4.3. Onshore and Offshore Wind Turbines
  • 4.4. Wind Turbine Configuration
  • 4.5. Wind Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 4.6. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 5. Geothermal Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 5.1. Geothermal Energy Advantages and Disadvantages
  • 5.2. Geothermal Power Plants
  • 5.3. Types of Geothermal Power Plants
  • 5.4. Geothermal Heat Pumps
  • 5.5. Types of Geothermal Heat Pumps
  • 5.6. Flashing Types of Geothermal-Assisted Hydrogen Production Plants with Reinjection
  • 5.7. Case Study 5
  • 5.8. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 6. Hydro Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 6.1. Working Principle
  • 6.2. Advantages and Disadvantages of Hydro Energy
  • 6.3. Classification of Hydropower Plants
  • 6.4. Hydroelectric Turbine and Generator
  • 6.5. Types of Hydropower Turbines
  • 6.6. Hydropower-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 6.7. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 7. Ocean Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 7.1. Ocean Energy Productions Steps
  • 7.2. Ocean Energy Conversion
  • 7.3. Ocean Energy Devices and Designs
  • 7.4. Types of Ocean Energy
  • 7.5. Advantages and Disadvantages
  • 7.6. Case Study 6
  • 7.7. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 8. Biomass Energy-Based Hydrogen Production
  • 8.1. Advantages and Disadvantages of Biomass Energy
  • 8.2. Biomass as a Renewable Energy Resource
  • 8.3. Pyrolysis
  • 8.4. Biomass Gasification
  • 8.5. Types of Gasifiers
  • 8.6. Case Study 7
  • 8.7. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 9. Integrated Systems for Hydrogen Production
  • 9.1. Status of Integrated Energy Systems
  • 9.2. Significance of Integrated Energy Systems
  • 9.3. Case Study 8
  • 9.4. Case Study 9
  • 9.5. Case Study 10
  • 9.6. Closing Remarks
  • Chapter 10. Conclusions and Future Directions
  • 10.1. Conclusions
  • 10.2. Future Directions
  • References
  • Appendix
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 382
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: November 26, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323851763
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323851893

About the Authors

Ibrahim Dincer

Ibrahim Dincer is a full professor of Mechanical Engineering at Ontario Tech University (formerly University of Ontario Institute of Technology). Renowned for his pioneering works in sustainable energy technologies he has authored/co-authored numerous books and book chapters, and many refereed journal and conference papers. He has chaired many national and international conferences, symposia, workshops, and technical meetings. He has delivered many keynotes and invited lectures. He is an active member of various international scientific organizations and societies, and serves as Editor-in-Chief, associate editor, regional editor, and editorial board member on various prestigious international journals. He is a recipient of several research, teaching and service awards, including the Premier's research excellence award in Ontario, Canada. During the past six years he has been recognized by Thomson Reuters as one of The Most Influential Scientific Minds in Engineering and one of the most highly cited researchers.

Affiliations and Expertise

Full professor of Mechanical Engineering, Ontario Tech. University, Canada

Haris Ishaq

Haris Ishaq has just completed his PhD on the investigations of integrated systems for clean ammonia synthesis during PhD under the supervision of Prof. Dincer at Ontario Tech. University. His current research focuses on developing environmentally benign and sustainable systems for hydrogen production and exploring different renewable energy routes. He also pursued his MASc. degree in the area of heat recovery and thermal management of the thermochemical ‎Cu-Cl cycle linked with industrial processes for hydrogen production.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Ontario, Institute of Technology, Ontario, Canada

Ratings and Reviews

Write a review

There are currently no reviews for "Renewable Hydrogen Production"