Recent Advances and Controversies in Gamma Knife Neurosurgery

Recent Advances and Controversies in Gamma Knife Neurosurgery

1st Edition - January 20, 2022

Write a review

  • Editor: Jeremy Ganz
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128235645
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128235652

Purchase options

Purchase options
Available
DRM-free (PDF, EPub)
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Recent Advances and Controversies in Gamma Knife Neurosurgery, Volume 268, the latest release in the Progress in Brain Research series, highlights new advances in the field with this new volume presenting interesting chapters on the latest in Dosimetry, Radiobiology, Evolving Gamma Knife Technology, Imaging, Arteriovenous Malformations, Dural A-V Fistulae, Cavernous Malformations, Vestibular Schwannoma, Other Schwannoma, Meningiomas, Pituitary Adenomas, Craniopharyngiomas, Metastases, Glioma Low Grade, Glioma High Grade, Glomus Tumors, Less Common Tumors, Orbital Indications, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Epilepsy, Movement, Psychosurgery, and Future Trends.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in Progress in Brain Research serials
  • Updated release includes the latest information on Recent Advances and Controversies in Gamma Knife Neurosurgery

Readership

Undergraduates, graduates, academics, and researchers in the field of neurology, brain research, and gamma knife surgery

Table of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributor
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1: A glance at the past
  • Abstract
  • 1: Observations from the past
  • 2: Functional indications for radiosurgery before the gamma knife
  • 3: Early gamma knife patients
  • 4: Comments on reporting practices
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Dosimetry
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Interaction between radiation and matter
  • 3: Dosimetry and radiosurgery
  • 4: Current dosimetry
  • 5: Treatment plans
  • 6: Dose algorithms
  • 7: Inverse treatment planning
  • 8: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Radiobiology
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Effects of ionizing radiation on pathological tissue
  • 3: Changes in practice
  • 4: Ionizing radiation and functional indications
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Gamma Knife evolving instrumentation
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Original Gamma Knives
  • 3: Gamma Knife Perfexion
  • 4: Gamma Knife ICON
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Radiosurgery imaging
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Magnetic resonance imaging
  • 3: PET scans
  • 4: Computed tomography (CT) scans
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Intracranial arteriovenous malformations
  • Abstract
  • 1: Therapy options
  • 2: Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKNS) assessment
  • 3: Gamma Knife treatment
  • 4: Gamma Knife outcomes
  • 5: Gamma Knife treatment complications
  • 6: Larger AVMs
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Intracranial dural A-V fistulae
  • Abstract
  • 1: Background
  • 2: Clinical features
  • 3: Treatment
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Cavernous malformations
  • Abstract
  • 1: Background
  • 2: Management
  • 3: Microsurgery
  • 4: Gamma knife radiosurgery
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Vestibular Schwannomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: Background
  • 2: Results of different managements
  • 3: Gamma Knife treatment of Vestibular Schwannomas
  • 4: Neurofibromatosis 2
  • 5: Malignant transformation
  • 6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Meningiomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Natural history
  • 3: GKNS management: General
  • 4: Modern review
  • 5: Modern series
  • 6: Asymptomatic tumors
  • 7: Large meningiomas and fractionation
  • 8: GKNS management: By location
  • 9: GKNS tumor control and WHO grade
  • 10: GKNS salvage therapy for meningiomas
  • 11: GKNS and complications
  • 12: GKNS for meningiomas: The dural tails
  • 13: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Pituitary adenomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Non-functioning adenomas (NFAs)
  • 3: Cushing's disease
  • 4: Acromegaly
  • 5: Prolactinomas
  • 6: Nelson's syndrome
  • 7: Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary tumors
  • 8: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Craniopharyngiomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: Conventional management
  • 2: Clinical deficits
  • 3: Recurrence
  • 4: Fractionated radiotherapy
  • 5: Surgery—Yasargil
  • 6: Surgery Fahlbusch
  • 7: Surgery—Endonasal endoscopic
  • 8: Craniopharyngioma cysts
  • 9: Gamma knife radiosurgery
  • 10: GKNS and fractionated radiotherapy
  • 11: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Cerebral metastases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Pre-treatment management
  • 3: Preparation for treatment
  • 4: Frameless treatment
  • 5: Fractionation
  • 6: Patterns of treatment
  • 7: BM location
  • 8: Microsurgery
  • 9: Salvage
  • 10: Primary tumor
  • 11: Follow-up
  • 12: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: High grade gliomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: Classifications
  • 2: Grade III Astrocytoma
  • 3: Glioblastoma
  • 4: Brain stem Gliomas
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Low grade gliomas
  • Abstract
  • 1: The new classification of brain tumors
  • 2: Pilocytic astrocytomas
  • 3: Oligodendrogliomas: Grade II
  • 4: Diffuse astrocytomas: Grade II
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Less common extracerebral tumors
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Benign tumors: Non-vestibular schwannomas
  • 3: Benign tumors: Glomus tumors
  • 4: Benign tumors: Cavernous hemangiomas
  • 5: Malignant tumors: Chordomas and chondrosarcomas
  • 6: Malignant tumors: Solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma
  • 7: Malignant tumors: Tumors of the nasopharynx
  • 8: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Less common intraparenchymal tumors
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Ependymoma
  • 3: Medulloblastoma
  • 4: Choroid plexus papilloma
  • 5: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL)
  • 6: Neurocytoma
  • 7: Pineal region tumors
  • 8: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Orbital indications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Intraocular Melanoma
  • 2: Choroidal hemangioma
  • 3: Optic nerve gliomas (ONGs)
  • 4: Glaucoma
  • 5: Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • 6: Endocrine ophthalmopathy
  • 7: Neovascular macular degeneration
  • 8: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Epilepsy
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Epilepsy associated a visible lesion
  • 3: How does GKNS affect epilepsy?
  • 4: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE)
  • 5: Hypothalamic hamartomas and gelastic epilepsy
  • 6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Trigeminal neuralgia and other cranial pain syndromes
  • Abstract
  • 1: Trigeminal neuralgia classification
  • 2: Primary trigeminal neuralgia management
  • 3: Secondary trigeminal neuralgia
  • 4: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN)
  • 5: Sphenopalatine neuralgia (SN)
  • 6: Cluster headache
  • 7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Movement disorders
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Thalamotomy
  • 3: Pallidotomy
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Behavioral disorders
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction—Troubled evolution
  • 2: Available psychosurgical techniques
  • 3: Gamma Knife radiosurgery
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Conclusions
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Unexplained phenomena
  • 3: Trigeminal neuralgia
  • 4: Anterior visual pathway
  • 5: The cochlear dose
  • 6: Fractionation
  • 7: Either/Or versus both/And
  • 8: Conclusion
  • References

Product details

  • No. of pages: 420
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: January 20, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128235645
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128235652

About the Serial Volume Editor

Jeremy Ganz

Born 1943. Educated Craig y nos preparatory school Swansea, Ellesmere College, St. John's College Cambridge and St. Thomas's Hospital London. Trained in neurosurgery at Queen Square London, Frenchay Hospital Bristol and the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Practised as a neurosurgeon in Bergen from 1979 to 1993 and again from 2007 to 2010, when he retired. Between 1985 and 1990 undertook the work in Oslo which formed the basis for a doctoral thesis on intracranial epidural bleeding. Between 1993 and and 2001 travelled the world teaching Gamma Knife neurosurgery and from 2001 to 2007 was the medical director of the Gamma Knife Center in Cairo. Since retirement in 2010 had one year teaching neurology to undergraduate medical students in Shantou in China. Since 2011 has been engaged in researching and publishing papers on neurosurgical history.

Affiliations and Expertise

(Retired) Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway

Ratings and Reviews

Write a review

There are currently no reviews for "Recent Advances and Controversies in Gamma Knife Neurosurgery"