Reaching Net Zero - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128233665

Reaching Net Zero

1st Edition

What it Takes to Solve the Global Climate Crisis

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Authors: Craig Smith William Fletcher
Paperback ISBN: 9780128233665
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 1st August 2020
Page Count: 400
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Description

Reaching Net Zero: What It Takes to Solve the Global Climate Crisis addresses the imminent need to fully understand the causes, effects and evidence of global warming; due to the large amount of climate disinformation and complexity of much of the available valid science, this book addresses the science of global warming in a concise, readable manner while providing an in-depth reference for readers who want more detail or to study the sources of information. Reaching Net Zero also investigates potential practical next steps of interest to concerned scientists, engineers and citizens, with an aim to further discuss and achieve the eventual Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) ‘Net Zero’ goals. Solving the problem of reaching net zero requires educating others to support the changes that must occur and to provide the possible solutions required. This is a necessary read for academics in climate and environmental science, and specialists such as those in earth science or environmental studies, covering the science, technology, economics, politics, international, and other issues involved in doing something about global warming. It is also important for those interested in global warming and anyone involved in decision-making processes and legislation that deal with reduction in carbon footprints.

Key Features

  • Provides in-depth discussion of understanding the problem of global warming, with clear explanations of the science behind global warming and climate change
  • Features case studies of successes and failures in reducing carbon footprints, with advised potential solutions for reaching net zero
  • Takes a realistic approach to the problem and solutions of global warming in light of all available evidence across multiple disciplines

Readership

Academics and researchers in climate change, Climate change engineers, undergraduate and postgrad students, government officials, legislators. Courses in Climate Science and Environmental Science

Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION
Should we be concerned about global warming?
What about solar radiation?
The greenhouse effect.
What are the greenhouse gases?
What are the signs of global warming?
What are the dangers of global warming?
Key points of this book.
What can we do about global warming?

2. ADDRESSING GLOBAL WARMING
Latency is a huge problem.
Global warming is not obvious to the vast majority of people.
The global economy is powered by fossil fuels.
There is a need for unprecedented and perhaps unachievable international cooperation.
All of us will have to make some sacrifices.
U.S. leadership is essential.

PART ONE

3. THE EARTH AS A SYSTEM
Incident solar radiation.
Milankovitch cycles.
The greenhouse effect.
Carbon cycle.
Temperature increase.

4. FUNDAMENTAL DRIVERS OF GLOBAL WARMING
Global population rising.
Inequities: the early role of the U.S and the U.K.
The pivotal position of the U.S.
Need to consider both absolute and per capita emissions.
GDP growth and energy use are related.
More energy will be required by developing countries.

5. HOW DO WE KNOW GLOBAL WARMING IS REAL?
Global warming is not a new idea.
CO2 emissions are rising.
Earth’s temperature is rising.
Correlation of increasing global temperature with increasing atmospheric CO2.
Ocean temperatures are rising.
Sea levels are rising.
Ocean acidification is occurring.
A message from the Arctic.
Glaciers, ice caps, and sea ice are melting.
The permafrost is melting.
Extreme weather events are increasing.
Deserts and tropics are expanding.
Rising temperatures are causing plant, animal, and human migration.
Early warning signs of global warming: A California case history.

6. HOW DO WE KNOW MAN-MADE CO2 IS THE ISSUE?
Where do manmade greenhouse gases come from?
What happens to CO2 emissions?
The significance of Carbon 14.
Historic emissions since the Industrial Revolution.
Increases in atmospheric CO2 correlate with fossil fuel use.
What is your carbon footprint?

7. WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING
Latency—how long before effects show up?
Climate change versus weather.
Earth’s temperature will continue to rise.
Air pollution will increase.
Sea levels rise causing flooding.
Oceans become more acidic.
Glaciers, icecaps, and sea ice melt.
Subsidence occurs and permafrost melts.
Deserts and tropics expand.
Species migration and extinction.
Frequency and severity of storms.
Impact on agriculture, droughts, loss of croplands, and wildfires.
Health problems will be more severe.
National security implications.
Migrations caused by climate change.
Tipping points: unanticipated changes can occur.

8. INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS TO ADDRESS GLOBAL WARMING
Early efforts.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
The Paris Accord.

PART TWO

9. WHAT WOULD IT TAKE TO STOP GLOBAL WARMING?
IPCC alternative scenarios.
What would it take?
Are the IPCC scenarios realistic?
Carbon removal.
What is a more likely scenario?
Are we too late already?
Doing nothing is not an option.
What will happen if we do nothing?
The high cost of doing nothing.

10. ENERGY ALTERNATIVES
Fossil fuels: coal, oil, natural gas.
Nuclear power.
Renewable energy: solar, wind, hydroelectricity, biofuels.
Solar energy.
Wind power.
Hydroelectricity.
Biofuels.
Hydrogen.
Converting CO2 into usable liquid fuels.
Energy storage.
Smart grids.
The micro grid.
Competitors to traditional utilities.

11. UNIQUE PROBLEMS OF MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO GLOBAL WARMING
What can we learn from Germany?
The U.S. fails to take a leadership position.
China—will it be the leader?
India—large population, little energy.
Japan—strong technological capabilities.
Russia—may not be a player.
Observations.

12. WHY IS GLOBAL WARMING SUCH A DIFFICULT PROBLEM TO SOLVE?
The need for unprecedented, perhaps unachievable, global cooperation.
Getting the public on board.
The media have not dealt fairly with global warming.
Educating the public.
A positive message.
Realizing that people resist change.
Accepting that modern economies are energy dependent and fossil fuels are big business.
Solving technical challenges.
The need for strong economies.
Understanding climate change skepticism.
Recognizing political leaders can make mistakes.
Acknowledging that failure is a possibility.

13. SOME SUCCESSES AND FAILURES
The Permian Basin, a renewable energy powerhouse.
1970s oil price hikes.
Automobile emissions.
Hole in ozone layer.
Cigarette smoking and cancer.
Europe’s push for diesel vehicles.
Nuclear power in the U.S.
Is there a future for nuclear power?
Ethanol.
High speed rail.
Lessons learned.
PART THREE

14. ACTION PLAN
Do we need another moon shot?
The challenges of a global approach.
What needs to be done?
The carbon budget.
An action plan, assuming we can’t get to net zero by 2050.
Major assumptions underlying Action Plan.
Why can’t we do better?
What about the carbon budget?
What would it take to get to net zero?
Silver bullets.
Carbon fee.
Mitigation.

15. CAN IT BE DONE?
The trend is our friend.
Can renewable energy power the world?
Can wind power the world?
What would it cost?
Can we afford it?

16. THE WAY FORWARD
The future can be bright.
Top priorities.
Government actions.
Actions for concerned citizens.
Actions for industry.
What next?

17. AFTERWORD

Details

No. of pages:
400
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2020
Published:
1st August 2020
Imprint:
Elsevier
Paperback ISBN:
9780128233665

About the Author

Craig Smith

Craig Smith retired as President and Chairman, DMJM H+N, a large international architect/engineering and construction management firm. Craig’s professional career began as an assistant professor of engineering at UCLA, where he was also the assistant director of the nuclear energy laboratory. After seven years at UCLA, he cofounded ANCO Engineers, Inc., an engineering consulting firm in Los Angeles. From 1988 to 1992 he was the president of FSEC, a Los Angeles architecture/engineering/construction firm, then joined AECOM Technology Corporation, one of the world’s largest architecture, engineering and construction companies, as a vice president of Daniel Mann, Johnson, and Mendenhall (DMJM), where he served as the practice manager for DMJM’s construction and facilities management practice. He was subsequently promoted to senior vice president, executive vice president, and chief operating officer. In 1999, he was named president of Holmes and Narver, Inc. During his career, Craig has been broadly involved in the field of energy and power, having designed, built, or conducted tests and research on nearly every type of electrical generating facility, including hydroelectric plants, geothermal, waste-to-energy, coal-fired, nuclear, natural gas-fired, and solar.

Affiliations and Expertise

Former President and Chairman, DMJM+H&N, California, USA

William Fletcher

Bill Fletcher retired as Senior Vice President at Rockwell International Corporation responsible for corporate R&D and business planning. Most of his career involved business planning and international operations for technology based companies. After university graduation, he was an officer and engineer in the U.S. Navy, where he served for five years in the Naval Reactors Division of the Navy’s Bureau of Ships. Before joining Rockwell, Bill was a manager with Combustion Engineering Inc., involved with the design and construction of nuclear power plants. Bill also held management positions with Bechtel Corporation including an assignment in Saudi Arabia planning the large Jubail industrial development project on the Arabian Gulf. He was a management consultant with McKinsey and Company, Inc. His international experience includes expatriate assignments in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Canada.

Affiliations and Expertise

Former Senior Vice President, Rockwell International Corporation, USA

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