Psychiatric Genomics

Psychiatric Genomics

1st Edition - March 17, 2022

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  • Editors: Evangelia Eirini Tsermpini, Martin Alda, George P. Patrinos
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128196021
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128214008

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Description

Psychiatric Genomics presents and synthesizes available knowledge in the field of psychiatric genomics, offering methodologies to advance new research and aid clinical translation. After providing an introduction to genomics and psychiatry, international experts discuss the genomic basis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, addictions, eating disorders, and sleep disorders, among other disorders. In addition, recommendations for next steps in clinical implementation and drug discovery are discussed in-depth, with chapters dedicated to pharmacogenomics and antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers, adverse drug reactions, implementation of pharmacogenomics in psychiatric clinics, and ethical issues. Finally, methods sections provide a solid grounding in research approaches and computational analytics, from using animal models in psychiatric genomics and accessing biobanks, to employing computational analysis, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), brain pathophysiology, and endophenotypes in psychiatric research.

Key Features

  • Thoroughly examines the genetic mechanisms underlying a broad range of psychiatric disorders
  • Offers genomic methodologies and analytical approaches supporting new research and clinical translation, including personalized diagnosis and treatment models
  • Features chapter contributions from international leaders in the field

Readership

Human geneticists; human genomicists; translational researchers in genomic medicine, epigenetics, neuroscience, neuropsychiatry, and biological psychiatry; life science researchers; developmental biologists; neurologists, psychiatrists; pharmacologists in industry and academia; clinicians and graduate students in genetics and genomic medicine

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • List of contributors
  • About the editors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Genomics and psychiatry: a historical overview
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The Middle Ages
  • The 18th century
  • Era of enlightenment
  • The 19th century
  • The 20th century
  • Twin studies
  • Adoption studies
  • Modern family studies
  • DNA sequencing
  • 21st century
  • Human genome project
  • Genome-wide association studies
  • Consortia
  • Lessons learned from history
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Schizophrenia genomics
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Schizophrenia heritability
  • Molecular genetics before genomics
  • Defining the phenotype
  • Genome-wide association studies
  • Rare structural risk variants
  • Genome sequencing studies
  • Lessons learned from schizophrenia genomics
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Genetics of bipolar disorder
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Family and adoption studies
  • Genome-wide association studies
  • GWAS in BD
  • Genetic architecture of BD
  • From genetic loci to disease mechanisms
  • Rare genetic variants in BD
  • Potential clinical implications of BD genetics
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Competing financial interests
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Genetics of depression
  • Abstract
  • Genetic factors affecting the onset of depression
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Genetics of personality disorders
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • First evidence of genetic predisposition in personality disorders
  • Genome-wide associations studies in personality disorders
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Genomics and epigenomics of anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders
  • Abstract
  • Clinical genetics, molecular genetics, gene-environment interactions and epigenetics of anxiety disorders
  • Molecular genetics
  • Gene–environment interactions and epigenetics
  • Molecular genetics
  • Gene–environment interactions and epigenetics
  • Therapy (epi)genetics of anxiety and OCDs
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Neurogenetics of alcohol use disorder a subset of reward deficiency syndrome: candidate genes to be or not to be?
  • Abstract
  • Introduction—a historical overview
  • Finding the first alcohol gene
  • Understanding polygenic inheritance of alcoholism and links to opioids
  • GARS case–controls and targeted endophenotypes for alcohol abuse and alcoholism
  • Importance of genome wide association studies: convergence to candidates
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Author contribution
  • Funding
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Pharmacogenomics and antipsychotics: efficacy and adverse drug reactions
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotics metabolizing enzymes and drug targets
  • Pharmacogenes involved in antipsychotic metabolism and transport
  • Pharmacogenomics of antipsychotic efficacy
  • Candidate gene studies of treatment response
  • Genomic studies of antipsychotic efficacy
  • Epigenetics of treatment response
  • Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic-induced adverse drug reactions
  • Tardive dyskinesia
  • Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and neutropenia
  • Antipsychotic-induced weight gain
  • Pharmacogenetic-based treatment guidelines for antipsychotics
  • Pharmacogenomic testing
  • Clinical implementation studies
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Pharmacogenomics and antidepressants: efficacy and adverse drug reactions
  • Abstract
  • Financial disclosures (last 3 years)
  • Cautionary statements
  • Safety versus efficacy, and pharmacokinetics versus pharmacodynamics
  • Pharmacokinetic pharmacogenomics and efficacy
  • Pharmacodynamic pharmacogenomics and efficacy
  • Antidepressant efficacy trials using combinatorial pharmacogenomic panels
  • Clinical implications and future directions
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Pharmacogenomics and mood stabilizers: efficacy and adverse drug reactions
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Pharmacogenomics of lithium
  • Pharmacogenomics of other mood stabilizers
  • Discussion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Balancing prevention and respect: the ethical stakes of a psychiatric genomics lens for mental disorder and intellectual disability
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual framing and ethical orientation: points of divergence
  • Challenging projections of suffering
  • Responding to the ethical stakes
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Genetic animal models for psychiatric disorders
  • Abstract
  • Genetic evidence, epidemiology, and genetic animal models
  • Schizophrenia
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Psychiatric genomics: brain pathophysiology and genetic factors
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Schizophrenia
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Integration with systems biology approaches and -omics data to characterize risk variation
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Functional annotation of noncoding regions
  • Context-specific genetic regulation
  • Mapping GWAS to QTLs
  • Multi-QTL methods
  • Annotation of variants to gene pathways
  • Conclusion/Future Directions
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Usage of biobank data for psychiatric genomics and promotion of precision psychiatry
  • Abstract
  • Introduction to biobanks
  • Psychiatric genomics in a biobank setting
  • Contextualizing the limitations of biobanks for psychiatric genomics
  • Algorithmic phenotyping
  • Evaluation of algorithmic phenotyping
  • Chart review
  • Automated phenotyping
  • Major impact of biobanks on psychiatric genomics research
  • Applications to genome-wide association studies
  • Phenome-wide and lab-wide association studies
  • Practicing the implementation of precision psychiatry
  • Ethical considerations
  • Future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Shared heritability among psychiatric disorders and traits
  • Abstract
  • Heritability
  • Shared heritability, genetic overlap, and pleiotropy
  • Evaluating genetic overlap
  • Rare variant genetic overlap
  • Implications for psychiatry
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • Competing financial interests
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Endophenotypes in psychiatric genomics: a selective review of their status and a call to action
  • Abstract
  • Introduction and context: The endophenotype construct
  • Progress in identifying genomic endophenotypes
  • Questioning the clinical utility of endophenotypes
  • Advancing a dimensional understanding of psychopathology
  • Clinical translation of endophenotypes
  • Race and racism in psychiatric genomics
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 418
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: March 17, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128196021
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128214008

About the Editors

Evangelia Eirini Tsermpini

Dr. Evangelia Eirini Tsermpini is a postdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana in Slovenia, since September 2021. She obtained her Ph.D. in 2016 from the Department of Pharmacy of the University of Patras, where she worked in the Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Therapy under the supervision of Professor George Patrinos. After her Ph.D., she worked as an academic scholar at the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacy of the University of Patras, and a senior research scientist and group leader at the Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Therapy at the Department of Pharmacy of the University of Patras, until July 2021. She was a visiting scholar at the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina, a research associate at RIKEN, Genomic Research Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan, as well as at the Department of Neuroscience and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Cagliari, in Italy. Her field of expertise is psychiatric genomics, pharmacogenomics, transcriptomics and epigenomics. Her research is related to identifying genetic biomarkers associated with the development of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, alcohol use disorder and psychiatric drugs response. Other research interests include discovering and assessing miRNAs biomarkers for early diagnosis of schizophrenia and antipsychotic response and investigating leukocyte telomere length in mental disorders. Furthermore, from 2016 and until 2021 she was actively involved in the First European Implementation study, funded by the European Commission. Dr. Tsermpini has received twice the first prize for the high quality of research during her Ph.D. She has published 28 scientific articles, six chapters in international peer-reviewed journals and textbooks, and many abstracts in international conference proceedings. She is a reviewer for several scientific journals and an evaluator in grant evaluation committees.

Affiliations and Expertise

Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Martin Alda

Martin Alda, MD, FRCPC is a Professor of Psychiatry and Killam Chair in Mood Disorders at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. An active clinician, Dr. Alda works as the head of the Mood Disorders Program at the QEII Health Sciences Centre in Halifax. After graduating from the medical school at Charles University in Prague, he trained in psychiatry at Charles University and at the University of Ottawa. Dr. Alda’s work has been at the junction of clinical and basic research, investigating genetic and neurobiological markers of mood disorders and response to treatment. His clinical, genetic, pharmacogenetic, and brain imaging studies are based on carefully characterized prospective clinical samples and their aim is to develop methods of personalized treatment in psychiatry.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and Killam Chair in Mood Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University; Head, Mood Disorders Program NS Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

George P. Patrinos

George Patrinos is Professor of Pharmacogenomics at the University of Patras School of Health Sciences (Department of Pharmacy) in Patras, Greece with Adjunct positions in Rotterdam, the Netherlands and Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates. His research interests span the fields of pharmacogenomics and personalised medicine, focused on psychiatric diseases and hemoglobinopathies, the implementation of genomics into healthcare, particularly for health systems in developing countries, the development of genomic databases and web-based translational tools for personalised medicine and the application of genomics in public health. George Patrinos has published more than 270 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals on topics related to genetics, genomic medicine, pharmacogenomics, molecular diagnostics, and social and economic evaluation for genomic medicine. He is also the editor of several textbooks published by Elsevier/Academic Press, including the renowned textbook "Molecular Diagnostics", published by Elsevier now in its third edition. He serves as Editor-In-Chief and Communicating and Associate Editor for several high impact scientific journals and he is co-organizer of the international meeting series “Golden Helix Conferences”.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras School of Health Sciences, Patras, Greece; United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Pathology, Al-Ain, UAE, United Arab Emirates University, Zayed Center of Health Sciences, Al-Ain, UAE and Erasmus University Medical Center, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Pathology – Bioinformatics Unit, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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