Proteomics in Biology, Part A - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128097427, 9780128105344

Proteomics in Biology, Part A, Volume 585

1st Edition

Serial Volume Editors: Arun K. Shukla
eBook ISBN: 9780128105344
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128097427
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 20th January 2017
Page Count: 548
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
143.00
100.10
100.10
100.10
100.10
100.10
114.40
114.40
125.00
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
87.50
100.00
100.00
199.00
139.30
139.30
139.30
139.30
139.30
159.20
159.20
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter One: An Easy and Fast Protocol for Affinity Bead-Based Protein Enrichment and Storage of Proteome Samples
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 StrataClean Beads for Protein Enrichment
    • 3 General Protocol for the Use of StrataClean Beads in Proteomics
    • 4 Application of StrataClean Beads in Protein Sample Preparation and Life Science Research
    • 5 Protocol Variations
    • 6 Conclusions
  • Chapter Two: Filter-Aided Sample Preparation: The Versatile and Efficient Method for Proteomic Analysis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 The FASP Procedures
    • 3 Filter-Aided Sample Preparation Protocols
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Three: An Overview of Advanced SILAC-Labeling Strategies for Quantitative Proteomics
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Dual Labeling to Exclude Unlabeled Proteins
    • 3 Subsaturating Labeling
    • 4 5-Plexed SILAC Labeling
    • 5 Conclusion
  • Chapter Four: Label-Free and Standard-Free Absolute Quantitative Proteomics Using the “Total Protein” and “Proteomic Ruler” Approaches
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 TPA: For Determination of Protein Contents and Concentrations
    • 3 Cell Size and Protein Copy Numbers Can Be Assessed by the Proteomic Ruler
    • 4 Protein Concentrations and Copy Numbers Provide Different Layers of Information
    • 5 Consistency of TPA Values With Biochemical Data
    • 6 Normalization and Comparison of Datasets Using DJ-1/PARK7 Titer
    • 7 Limitations
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Five: Separation of Two Distinct O-Glycoforms of Human IgA1 by Serial Lectin Chromatography Followed by Mass Spectrometry O-Glycan Analysis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Methodology
    • 3 Discussion
    • Acknowledgment
  • Chapter Six: Monitoring Protein Synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Using SILAC
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Principle of SILAC-Based Measurement of Protein Synthesis in C. elegans
    • 3 Experimental Procedures
    • 4 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgment
  • Chapter Seven: Identification of Novel Macropinocytosing Human Antibodies by Phage Display and High-Content Analysis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 HT-HCA Screening of Macropinocytic Antibodies: Overview of the Strategy and Method
    • 3 HT-HCA Screening Protocol for Macropinocytic Phage Antibodies
    • 4 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eight: Beyond the Natural Proteome: Nondegenerate Saturation Mutagenesis—Methodologies and Advantages
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Advantages of Nondegenerate Saturation
    • 3 Saturation Mutagenesis Methods
    • 4 Screening the Library: Methods, Library Size, and the Importance of Diversity
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Nine: WGCNA Application to Proteomic and Metabolomic Data Analysis
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Overview of WGCNA Protocol
    • 3 Application in Proteomic Analysis
    • 4 Application in Metabolomics Analysis
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
    • Data Availability
  • Chapter Ten: A Protocol for Large-Scale Proteomic Analysis of Microdissected Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embedded Tissue
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 FFPE–FASP–SAX Protocol
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eleven: Body Fluid Degradomics and Characterization of Basic N-Terminome
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 N-Terminal Enrichment Strategies
    • 3 Body Fluid Degradomics by iTRAQ-TAILS
    • 4 Validation by Targeted Proteomics and Establishment of Biomarker Assays
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Twelve: Reannotation of Genomes by Means of Proteomics Data
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Bacterial Proteogenomics: The Methods
    • 3 General Protocol
    • 4 Conclusion
  • Chapter Thirteen: Proteogenomics: Recycling Public Data to Improve Genome Annotations
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Data
    • 3 Databases
    • 4 Peptide and Protein Identification
    • 5 Proteogenomics Toolkits
    • 6 Sequence Validation
    • 7 Limitations
    • 8 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter Fourteen: Targeted In-Depth Quantification of Signaling Using Label-Free Mass Spectrometry
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Phosphoproteomic Analysis as a Means to Quantify Cell Signaling
    • 3 Overview of Methodologies for Phosphoproteomics
    • 4 The Concepts of TIQUAS
    • 5 Obtaining Biological Information From Phosphoproteomics Datasets
    • 6 Conclusions
  • Chapter Fifteen: Biotin Switch Assays for Quantitation of Reversible Cysteine Oxidation
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Chemicals
    • 3 Method
    • 4 Application
    • 5 Conclusion
  • Chapter Sixteen: Application of a Thioredoxin-Trapping Mutant for Analysis of the Cellular Nitrosoproteome
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Materials
    • 3 Methods
    • 4 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Seventeen: Combining Click Chemistry-Based Proteomics With Dox-Inducible Gene Expression
    • Abstract
    • 1 Background
    • 2 Combined Experimental Strategy
    • 3 Application and Modification
    • 4 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Eighteen: Analysis of the Proteome of Hair-Cell Stereocilia by Mass Spectrometry
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Isolation of Hair Bundles
    • 3 Shotgun Mass Spectrometry
    • 4 Targeted Mass Spectrometry
    • 5 Summary
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Nineteen: Proteomic Analysis of Metabolic Responses to Biofuels and Chemicals in Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Current Proteomics Methods Used in Analyzing Metabolic Responses
    • 3 Metabolic Responses of Cyanobacteria to Biofuels Revealed by Proteomics
    • 4 Metabolic Responses to Chemicals Revealed by Proteomics in Cyanobacteria
    • 5 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Twenty: Deep Profiling of Proteome and Phosphoproteome by Isobaric Labeling, Extensive Liquid Chromatography, and Mass Spectrometry
    • Abstract
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Sample Preparation by Harvesting Cells and Tissues
    • 3 Protein Extraction, Quality Control Western Blotting, In-Solution Digestion, and Peptide Purification
    • 4 TMT Labeling of Peptides
    • 5 Offline Basic pH RPLC Fractionation
    • 6 TiO2 Phosphopeptide Enrichment
    • 7 Acidic pH RPLC-MS/MS Analysis
    • 8 MS Data Analysis
    • 9 Proteomics Results and Selected Validation
    • 10 Conclusions and Discussion
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Twenty-One: Glycoprotein Enrichment Analytical Techniques: Advantages and Disadvantages
    • Abstract
    • 1 Proteomics: Posttranslational Modifications
    • 2 Challenges Associated With Glycoprotein Analysis
    • 3 Enrichment Techniques of Glycopeptides
    • 4 High-Performance Liquid Chromatography in Proteomics and Glycoproteomics
    • 5 Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry
    • 6 Capillary Electrophoresis
    • 7 Characterization of Intact Glycopeptides
    • 8 Characterization of Intact Glycoproteins
    • 9 Software Tools for MS/MS-Based Glycopeptide Characterization
    • 10 Concluding Remarks and Future Directions
    • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter Twenty-Two: Quantitative Glycomics: A Combined Analytical and Bioinformatics Approach
    • Abstract
    • 1 Protein Glycosylation
    • 2 Sample Handling in Glycomics
    • 3 Quantitative Glycomics Platforms
    • Acknowledgments
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

Description

Proteomics in Biology Part A, the latest volume in the Methods in Enzymology series, continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field, and a focus on proteomics for this updated volume.

Key Features

  • Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters that focus on proteomics
  • Contains contributions from leading authorities

Readership

Biochemists, biophysicists, molecular biologists, analytical chemists, and physiologists


Details

No. of pages:
548
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128105344
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128097427

Reviews

Praise for the Series:
"Should be on the shelves of all libraries in the world as a whole collection." --Chemistry in Industry
"The work most often consulted in the lab." --Enzymologia
"
The Methods in Enzymology series represents the gold-standard." --Neuroscience


About the Serial Volume Editors

Arun K. Shukla Serial Volume Editor

Dr. Arun K. Shukla obtained his M.Sc. (Master in Science) from the Center for Biotechnology at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India. Dr. Shukla did his Ph.D. from the Department of Molecular Membrane Biology at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt, Germany. His Ph.D. research work was focused on structural studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs).

Dr. Shukla subsequently carried out his post-doctoral work in the Department of Medicine at the Duke University in North Carolina, USA. During his post-doctoral research work, Dr. Shukla focused on understanding the biophysical and structural basis of ß-arrestin mediated regulation of GPCRs and non-canonical GPCR signaling. Dr. Shukla has served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Dr. Shukla is currently an Assistant Professor in Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. Dr. Shukla is also an Intermediate Fellow of the Wellcome Trust-DBT India Alliance. The research program in Dr. Shukla’s laboratory is focused on understanding the molecular mechanism of activation, signaling and regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India