Prosopis as a Heat Tolerant Nitrogen Fixing Desert Food Legume

Prosopis as a Heat Tolerant Nitrogen Fixing Desert Food Legume

Prospects for Economic Development in Arid Lands

1st Edition - December 7, 2021
  • Editors: Maria Cecilia Puppo, Peter Felker
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128233207
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236321

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Description

Prosopis describes the enormous historical importance of these trees as a human food source and reviews the contemporary food science of the fruit derived from these trees. As well, this treatise reviews the native genetic resources of this genus on 4 continents and classical genetic and horticultural techniques that could help stabilize the environment and alleviate human suffering on some of the world’s most destitute agro-ecosystems. This book is an essential read for researchers interested in forestry and plant science, environmental science, and functional foods. The legume family (Fabaceae) contains many genera and species that through their nitrogen fixing process provide high protein food and feed for humans and animals. As evidenced by its presence in Death Valley, California, which holds the record for the highest temperatures in the world, these types of plants can thrive in extreme environments.

Key Features

  • Edited by the world’s leading experts on Prospis species with globally recognized contributors
  • Covers the different perspectives surrounding the advantages and disadvantages of planting different Prosopis species
  • Discusses the applications of Prosopis species, including how the fruits of this tree can be used as a raw food material

Table of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Prosopis: An empowering forest resource in the service of science for humanity
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Archeological and contemporary use of Prosopis
  • Weedy issues of P. juliflora in Africa and India
  • Food components present in pods, mesocarp, and seeds of Prosopis species and their food technology
  • Limitations to development of Prosopis species
  • Needs to develop Prosopis for arid lands
  • Potential for alleviation of poverty elimination and ecosystem stabilization in Sahelian Africa by Peruvian Prosopis
  • Building more ecologically and economically sustainable arid ecosystems for more peaceful world
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Arid zones, soil carbon, nitrogen-fixing trees, ecosystem instability, economic volatility, and political turbulence
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nitrogen balance
  • Stress comparison of annual vs perennial N fixers
  • Soil carbon impact on soil physics and soil chemistry
  • Soil carbon impact on world carbon sequestration
  • Financing plantations for increased crop productivity, economic growth, and C sequestration with carbon credits
  • Influence of increased soil C and soil fertility on increased agricultural output, economic development, and political stability
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Role of Prosopis in reclamation of salt-affected soils and soil fertility improvement
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Distribution of salt-affected soils in the world
  • Salt-affected soils in India
  • Original properties of typical salt-affected soils (sodic soil)
  • Introduction of P. juliflora in India
  • Prosopis germplasm introduction and multiplication in India
  • Tolerance to salinity
  • Tolerance to sodicity/alkalinity
  • Survival, growth and biomass production of Prosopis and other tree species
  • Sodic soils reclamation by trees
  • Changes in physical properties
  • Changes in chemical properties
  • Changes in soil biological properties
  • P. juliflora in agroforestry
  • Changes in understorey vegetation species
  • P. juliflora based silvi pastoral system for biomelioration of sodic soils
  • P. juliflora’s role in livelihood security in dry areas
  • Research, development, and policy needs
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Prosopis as a weed. Causes and mediation techniques for weed control in developing countries
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Overharvest of ecosystem nitrogen from grazing as a cause for Prosopis colonization
  • Sylviculture of stand densities
  • Techniques for sustainably reducing Prosopis stand densities
  • Reduction seed dissemination and germination by collection and grinding for livestock rations
  • Prosopis genetic strains that could be recommended for long-term, replicated, small plot evaluation in areas recently cleared of undesirable Prosopis
  • Summary and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Management and control of the invasive Prosopis juliflora tree species in Africa with a focus on Kenya
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Initiatives to address Prosopis juliflora challenges in Kenya
  • Paradigm shift toward integrated management and control of Prosopis invasions in Kenya
  • The way forward
  • References
  • Chapter 6: The evolution of Prosopis management in Haiti
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Theoretical underpinnings
  • Historical emergence
  • Present extent and economic significance
  • Resilience and sustainability
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Prosopis in the history of the coast of Peru
  • Abstract
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Ethnobotany of Prosopis spp., past evidence of the fruit use and experimental archaeology applied to the interpretation of ancient food processing
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Prosopis natural distribution and taxonomy
  • Prosopis traditional uses
  • Prosopis in the Old World and Africa
  • Prosopis in the New World
  • Southwestern North America and northern Mexico
  • Central America and northern South America
  • Southern South America
  • Final considerations
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Genetic improvement in Prosopis
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • History of genetic improvement trials
  • Useful traits to include in genetic improvement programs
  • History of breeding and genetic improvement
  • History of clonal propagation-air layering, rooting cuttings, grafting, tissue culture
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Biotechnology and bioprospecting of Prosopis alpataco from Patagonia, Argentina
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Prosopis alpataco: Botanical aspects and uses
  • Germination conditions of Prosopis alpataco
  • Micropropagation of Prosopis alpataco
  • Nutritional value and bioprospecting of P. alpataco pods
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Utilization of Prosopis juliflora in the Horn of Africa: Recent developments
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Prosopis in the Horn of Africa
  • Impacts and solutions
  • Experiences from the Horn of Africa
  • A summary of common lessons and outstanding challenges
  • Recommendations
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Management, use, and control of Prosopis in Yemen
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Harvesting, thinning, and chipping dense Prosopis stands
  • Technology to control Prosopis resprouts
  • High-value dimensional wood products from Yemeni Prosopis
  • Prosopis pod utilization for animal feed
  • Prosopis pod utilization for human food
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Fine wood, architectural components, and furniture from Prosopis
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Physical and mechanical properties
  • Wood processing
  • Techniques for sawing and processing small diameter, short length logs
  • Wood drying
  • Wood finishing
  • Comparison of value of firewood, charcoal, and dimension lumber from small logs
  • Wood uses
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: The paradigm shift in Prosopis juliflora use through community participation by developing value chain of value-added products from pods
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Establishment of pod collection and training center at farm level
  • Testing for food safety standard
  • P. juliflora pods based value added products developed
  • Ready to commercialize products
  • Process technology developed
  • Summary of the developed value chain
  • Summing up
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Food safety issues and mitigation of Prosopis flour
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Prosopis pod morphology in relation to insect attack
  • Aflatoxins
  • Bacillus cereus
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Peruvian Prosopis pallida: Its potential to provide human and livestock food for tropical arid lands of the world
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Results
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Regional traditional foods from Prosopis spp. of the northwest of Argentina
  • Abstract
  • Algorrobo: History, ecology, and food
  • The great meaning of “algarrobo” (Prosopis spp.) for native people
  • Primary production of algarrobo (Prosopis alba) fruit and flour
  • Added value to the Prosopis spp. fruit and flour
  • Traditional recipes with algarrobo (Prosopis spp.) pods
  • Algarroba (Prosopis spp.) flour in baked products
  • The algarroba flour in gourmet products
  • References
  • Websites
  • Chapter 18: Omic sciences for analysis of different Prosopis species
  • Abstract
  • “Omics” science for foods
  • Application of omic science in molecular characterization of Prosopis spp. germs
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Prosopis alba mesocarp flour: A source of functional ingredients
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Prosopis alba flour
  • Phenolic compounds in P. alba mesocarp flour as a functional ingredient
  • Functional properties of phenolic enriched extracts
  • Toxicity
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Prosopis alba seed flour: A source of bioactive phenolic and proteins
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Prosopis alba seed flour
  • Prosopis alba seed proteins
  • Prosopis seed polyphenols compounds
  • Health impact using animal models
  • Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Chemical and nutritional composition of Prosopis spp. seeds and pods
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Nutritional aspects
  • Functional components of Prosopis pods and seeds
  • Flours conservation
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Galactomannans from different Prosopis species: Extraction, characterization, and applications
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Milling methods for Prosopis spp.
  • Gum extraction techniques
  • Prosopis spp. galactomannans characterization
  • Water sorption and thermal transitions
  • Potential Prosopis spp. galactomannans applications
  • Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Genetic variation in flavor of Prosopis mesocarp flours
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Methods
  • Results
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Foods with Prosopis spp. flour: Common and new baked products
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Breads with gluten: Blends with wheat flour and flour from Prosopis alba pods
  • Prosopis alba flour for gluten-free muffins
  • Semisweet gluten-free biscuits with Prosopis alba flour used as a partial sugar replacement
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 25: “Aloja”: A pre-Hispanic fermented beverage from Prosopis alba pods
  • Abstract
  • “Aloja”: The history
  • “Aloja”: Learning the ancestral know-how in its place of origin
  • “Aloja”: Reproduction in the laboratory of the ancient recipe
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 374
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 7, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128233207
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236321

About the Editors

Maria Cecilia Puppo

She has experience in the characterization of food components, mainly in proteins and carbohydrates, and in the study of the physicochemical changes of these components during food processing for obtaining gels, emulsions and different food matrices. In more recent years, she has carried out an in-depth study of the main components present in the pod and seeds of the American carob bean from different Prosopis species, and the analysis of the performance of these flours in the physicochemical, sensory and nutritional quality of baked foods containing Prosopis flour as food ingredients.

Affiliations and Expertise

Vice Director, CIDCA, Argentina; Professor; Department of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences, National University of La Plata (UNLP), Argentina; Principle Investigator of CONICET (the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research), Argentina

Peter Felker

He has dedicated his entire life to the investigation of the environmental conditions for the cultivation of Prosopis and the morphological and chemical characterization of the different fruits. In collaboration with Dr. Andrew Paterson of the Plant Mapping Laboratory at the University of Georgia he was also instrumental in getting the first genomic sequence of Prosopis.

Affiliations and Expertise

World Leader in the study of different varieties of Prosopis, in Latin America (Argentina, Peru, among others), USA, India and Africa