Programming Primer for the Macintosh® - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780124806214, 9781483265551

Programming Primer for the Macintosh®

1st Edition

Volume 1

Authors: John May Judy Whittle
eBook ISBN: 9781483265551
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 21st October 1994
Page Count: 302
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Description

Programming Primer for the Macintosh, Volume 1 focuses on the principles and operations of the Macintosh system.

The publication first offers information on the development environment, creating a simple program with Symantec C++, and a review of C++. Discussions focus on pointers, handles, patterns, points, creating a source file, compiling the program, adding libraries, adding file to the subject, building an application, and useful tools. The text then takes a look at the Macintosh ROM, Mac programs and system software, and toolbox managers. Topics include menu, window, control, and dialog manager, alerts, desktop interface, event-driven programming, trap mechanism, interface and library files, stack frame incompatibility, and the relationship between an application and toolbox. The book examines QuickDraw, alerts, and dialogs, memory manager, and object-oriented programming. Concerns include structures, linked list example, new and delete operators, and handling lines, rectangles, round rectangles, ovals, arcs, and polygons

The publication is a dependable reference for computer programmers and researchers interested in the Macintosh system.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments

Chapter 1 Introduction

History of the Macintosh

Macintosh Innovations

Apple Macintosh Naming Creations

Elements Comprising a Macintosh System

Common Peripheral Options

Connecting Components

Display Options

Video Circuitry

Input Options

Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) Connections

Small Computer Standard Interface (SCSI) Devices

SCSI Connections

Audio Input/Output Options

Audio Connections

Serial Device Options

Serial Port Connections

Network/Connectivity Options

Telephone Jack

Ethernet Port

Optional Ports

Electrical Power and Power Switch

Programmer's Switch

Startup

Shutdown

Sleep

Restart

Summary

Chapter 2 The Development Environment

What the Developer Needs

CPU

RAM Memory

Disk Memory

Screens

Peripherals

Other Things

A Word About Development Environments

MPW

Symantec Development Environment

Metrowerks® Code Warrior™

A Brief Look into the Future

Summary

Chapter 3 Creating a Simple Program with Symantec C++

Starting Symantec C++

Constructing a Project

Segments

Creating a Source File

Adding the File to the Project

Adding Libraries

Compiling the Program

Running the Program

Building an Application

Summary

Chapter 4 A Review of C++, Mac Style

Basic Variable Types

Advanced Variable Types

Points

Rects

Patterns

Val Vs. Var

Arrays

Pointers

Handles

Comments

Constants

If

Switch

While

Do-While

For

Break

Continue

Operators

Unary Prefixed Operators

Unary Postfix Operators

Binary Arithmetic and Logical Operators

Binary Assignment Operators

Binary Comparison Operators

The Ternary Operator

The C Preprocessor

Structure of a C Program

C Features Not Used on the Mac

Right-Left Rule

Left-Right Walk Through

Another Example

Summary

Chapter 5 The Macintosh ROM

It's All in the Name: The Toolbox

Managers

Relationship Between an Application and the Toolbox

Trap Mechanism

A Final Word on Traps

Interface and Library Files

Stack Frame Incompatibility

Summary

Chapter 6 Mac Programs and System Software

Macintosh Programs

Desk Accessory

Device Driver

Code Resource

Macintosh System Software

Event-driven Programming

Pizza Delivery Program

Types of Events

Structure of an Event-Driven Program

Event Manager

Priority of Events

Keyboard Events: A Revisit

Auto-Key Events

The Desktop Interface

Summary

Chapter 7 Toolbox Managers

Menu Manager

Menu Bar

Menus

Resources Involved in Menus

How Menus Work

Menu Scrolling

Keyboard Equivalents

Window Manager

Windows

How Windows Work

Window Regions

Update Regions

How Windows Are Drawn

Control Manager

How Controls Are Drawn

Control States

Dialog Manager

Dialog Types

How Dialog Boxes Are Drawn

Alerts

TextEdit Manager

List Manager

Scrap Manager

Resources

Advantages of Resources

Summary

Chapter 8 QuickDraw

Video Principles

The Macintosh Screen

Shapes Drawn by QuickDraw

Handling Lines

QuickDraw Terminology—GrafVerbs

Simple QuickDraw Toolbox Calls

Handling Rectangles

Handling Round Rectangles

Handling Ovals

Handling Arcs

Handling Polygons

Handling Regions

Handling Points

Handling Pictures

Example of Putting a Picture Together

More QuickDraw Terminology

BitMaps/PixMaps

CopyBits

BitMap/PixMap Bounds Value

Port Frame

The Graphics Pen

Pen Routines

Pen Frame

Pen and Port Frames

Text Characteristics

QuickDraw Text Routines

Font Frame

QuickDraw Color

Color Frame

Basic Color

Cursors

Example

Summary

Exercise

Chapter 9 Alerts and Dialogs

Alerts

ParamText

Alert Project

Dialogs

Button Dialog Project

Dialog Check Box Project

Radio Button Project

Dialog Static Text Project

Dialog Edit Text Project

Dialog Icon Project

Dialog PICT Project

Dialog User Item Project

Dialog Sound Project

Editing Sounds

Summary

Chapter 10 Memory Manager

Stack and Heap

The Stack

The Heap

Stack Sniffer

Memory Blocks in the Heap

How Heap Space Is Allocated

Pointers and the Heap

Handles and the Heap

Dereferencing

A Valid Pointer

Memory Frame

Why You May Not Want to Lock a Handle

Low-Memory Global Variables

Summary

Chapter 11 Object-Oriented Programming

OOP and C++

Structures

Declaring and Instance Structure

Referencing Data Members of Individual Structures

Member Functions and Structures

Encapsulation

Data Hiding

Class

Objects

Instance Variable

Methods

Messages

Accessor

Constructor

Destructor

The New and Delete Operators

Friends

Linked List Example

Designing the List Example

Using the TList and TNode Classes

Derived Classes

Pointers and Objects

Traditional or Object Programming: When to Use Each

Class Libraries

Summary

Chapter 12 Debugging and Finder Resources

Debugging

Types of Bugs

Debuggers

Symantec C++ Debugging

BOMBS!!!

Finder Resources

Giving an Application Its Own Icon

Creating a BNDL Resource in ResEdit

Adding the Icon to Your Program

vers Resources

Summary

Appendix A Glossary

Appendix B Bibliography

Index

Details

No. of pages:
302
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1995
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9781483265551

About the Author

John May

John May is the Group Leader for Computer Science in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His interests include parallel programming models, performance analysis, parallel I/O, and parallel programming tools. He has served on the MPI-2 Forum, the High Performance Debugger Forum, and the Steering Committee of the Parallel Tools Consortium. Currently, he works on the Parallel Performance Improvement project, where he is investigating performance analysis techniques for massively parallel computers.

Dr. May joined LLNL in 1994 after receiving his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego. He also holds a BA in Physics from Dartmouth College. Prior to entering graduate school, he worked at AT&T (now Lucent) Bell Laboratories on optoelectronic device technology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Judy Whittle

Ratings and Reviews