Process Modeling Style - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128009598, 9780128010402

Process Modeling Style

1st Edition

Authors: John Long
eBook ISBN: 9780128010402
Paperback ISBN: 9780128009598
Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann
Published Date: 14th March 2014
Page Count: 96
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
23.95
16.77
16.77
16.77
16.77
16.77
19.16
19.16
18.99
13.29
13.29
13.29
13.29
13.29
15.19
15.19
29.95
20.96
20.96
20.96
20.96
20.96
23.96
23.96
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Process Modeling Style focuses on other aspects of process modeling beyond notation that are very important to practitioners. Many people who model processes focus on the specific notation used to create their drawings. While that is important, there are many other aspects to modeling, such as naming, creating identifiers, descriptions, interfaces, patterns, and creating useful process documentation. Experience author John Long focuses on those non-notational aspects of modeling, which practitioners will find invaluable.

Key Features

  • Gives solid advice for creating roles, work products, and processes
  • Instucts on how to organize and structure the parts of a process
  • Gives examples of documents you should use to define a set of processes

Readership

Professionals who are beginning to work in the process modeling arena and are looking for real-world approaches that work. Experienced BPM professionals who want to strengthen existing skills.

Table of Contents

  • Dedication and Thanks
  • Author’s Information
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
    • I.1 Why a Style Book on Process Modeling?
    • I.2 A Lot of People Just Are Not “Process People”
    • I.3 The Need for Style
    • I.4 The Need for Accuracy and Detail
    • I.5 Toward a Process Architecture
    • I.6 What This Book Is Not
    • I.7 In Summary
  • Chapter 1. Eight of the Biggest Process Modeling Problems
    • 1.1 Not Focusing on the Diagrams
    • 1.2 Only Focusing on the Workflow Diagrams
    • 1.3 Ignoring the Process Architecture
    • 1.4 Ignoring Process Interfaces
    • 1.5 Inconsistent or Nonstandard Notation
    • 1.6 Making Overly Complicated Workflows
    • 1.7 Focusing on Jobs, Not Roles
    • 1.8 Fuzzy Work Products
  • Chapter 2. Selecting a Notation
    • 2.1 The Right Notation for You
    • 2.2 Flowcharts
    • 2.3 Business Process Modeling Notation
    • 2.4 Line of Visibility Enterprise Modeling
    • 2.5 Use Cases
    • 2.6 UML
    • 2.7 IDEF0
  • Chapter 3. Process Modeling Goals
    • 3.1 Purpose
    • 3.2 Scope
    • 3.3 Depth
    • 3.4 Degree of Automation
  • Chapter 4. Defining Processes and Process Elements
    • 4.1 Process
    • 4.2 Activity
    • 4.3 Task
    • 4.4 Procedure
    • 4.5 Role
    • 4.6 Work Product
  • Chapter 5. Process Structure
    • 5.1 Workflow Decomposition
    • 5.2 The Components of a Workflow Diagram
    • 5.3 The Value of Swim Lanes
    • 5.4 Horizontal Versus Vertical Workflows
    • 5.5 Grouping Processes
    • 5.6 Elemental Processes
    • 5.7 Scenarios
    • 5.8 Workflow Patterns
  • Chapter 6. How to Fix a Bad Workflow
    • 6.1 Uncoil Snaky Workflows
    • 6.2 Unravel Confusing Logic
    • 6.3 Use Consistent Notation
    • 6.4 Use Consistent Naming
  • Chapter 7. Naming Conventions
    • 7.1 Use a Consistent Naming Style
    • 7.2 All Names Should Be Unique
    • 7.3 Use Verbs and Nouns in a Consistent Way
    • 7.4 Naming Processes
    • 7.5 Naming Activities and Tasks
    • 7.6 Naming Work Products
    • 7.7 Naming Roles
  • Chapter 8. Identifier Conventions
    • 8.1 What is an Identifier (ID)?
    • 8.2 Why Identifiers are Important
    • 8.3 Work Product Identifiers
    • 8.4 Role Identifiers
  • Chapter 9. Workflow Connections and Relationships
    • 9.1 Workflow Connections
    • 9.2 Connections to or from Other Workflows
    • 9.3 Connections Within the Same Workflow
    • 9.4 Connections to or from Start and Stop Nodes
    • 9.5 Process Relationships
    • 9.6 Work Products
    • 9.7 Artifacts
    • 9.8 Deliverables
    • 9.9 Inputs, Outputs, and Controls
    • 9.10 Container Work Products
  • Chapter 10. Roles
    • 10.1 What Roles Are
    • 10.2 What Roles Are Not
    • 10.3 Role Relationships with Work Products
    • 10.4 Role Involvement with Processes
  • Chapter 11. Useful Process Documents
    • 11.1 Process Catalog
    • 11.2 Role Catalog
    • 11.3 Work Product Catalog
    • 11.4 Process Interface Matrix
    • 11.5 Work Product Participation Matrix
  • Chapter 12. Tools
    • 12.1 Drawing Tools
    • 12.2 Modeling Tools
    • 12.3 Simulation Tools
    • 12.4 Publishing Tools
    • 12.5 Reviewing Tools
    • 12.6 Execution Tools
  • Chapter 13. Conclusion: Which Style Elements Are Right for Your Team?
  • Appendix. Using Process Standards
    • A.1 ISO 9001
    • A.2 ISO 33000 and ISO IEC 15504

Details

No. of pages:
96
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Morgan Kaufmann 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Morgan Kaufmann
eBook ISBN:
9780128010402
Paperback ISBN:
9780128009598

About the Author

John Long

John Long is a process architect and BPM consultant. He has over 30 years of experience in the software, energy, banking, government, telecommunications, and crop science industries. He was the process architect for the IBM Tivoli Unified Process and participated in the eTOM interfaces with ITIL. John is the author of ITIL 2011 At a Glance (Springer).

Affiliations and Expertise

process architect, BPM consultant, and author of ITIL 2011 At a Glance