Problems of Cell Permeability

Problems of Cell Permeability

International Series of Monographs in Pure and Applied Biology: Modern Trends in Physiological Sciences, Vol. 26

1st Edition - January 1, 1966

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  • Author: A.S. Troshin
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483222615

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Description

Modern Trends in Physiological Science, Volume 26: Problem of Cell Permeability covers expounded sorptional theory of cell permerbeality. The problem of cell permeability deals with the questions connected with the laws of the entrance of substances from the surrounding medium into cells and the excretion from the latter of the products of intracellular metabolism. This book is composed of 12 chapters and begins with an overview of the chemical composition and structure of cell membrane, as well as the membrane theory of cell permeability. The next chapters treat the issues of cell’s osmometric activity and the physico-chemical properties of protoplasm as a system of coacervates. Considerable chapters are devoted to cell permeability for various substrates, such as non-electrolytes, organic acids, vital dyes, and mineral substances. The concluding chapters discuss the relationship between metabolism and cell permeability; the bioelectric properties of cell; and the protective action of non-electrolytes against live matter damage caused by dilute saline media. This book will be of value to cell biologists, biochemists, and research workers in cell permeability.

Table of Contents


  • Foreword by the Scientific Editor

    Author’s Preface to the English Edition

    Preface to the Russian Edition

    Introduction

    Chapter I. The Membrane Theory of Cell Permeability

    1. The Fundamental Propositions of the Classical Membrane Theory

    2. The Chemical Composition and Structure of the Cell Membrane

    3. Hypotheses of the Formation of Semi-permeable Membranes on the Surface of the Protoplasm

    4. Membrane Theories of the Mechanism of the Penetration of Substances into Cells

    5. The Role of the Cell Envelope in Permeability Phenomena

    6. Conclusions

    Chapter II. Do Live Cells have Osmometric Properties?

    1. Plant Cells

    2. Animal Cells

    3. The Permeability of Cells to Water

    4. Conclusions

    Chapter III. The Protoplasm as a Colloidal System

    1. Introductory Remarks

    2. Coacervates and their Formation

    3. Some Biologically Important Properties of Coacervates

    Immiscibility with the Surrounding Medium

    Vacuolisation

    The Mechanism of the Formation of Structures in Coacervates and in Protoplasm

    The Behaviour of Coacervate Drops in an Electric Field

    Sensitivity to Neutral Salts, Change in pH, Temperature and Other Factors

    Viscosity

    Surface Tension

    Colloidal Films at the Boundary Between Phases

    The Distribution of the Components of a Coacervate in the System: Coacervate-Equilibrating Solution

    4. Conclusions

    Chapter IV. The Distribution of Substances between a Coacervate and its Surrounding (Equilibrated) Fluid

    Chapter V. The Permeability of Cells for Non-electrolytes

    A. Animal Cells

    1. The Permeability of Cells for Sugars

    2. The Permeability of Cells for Urea and its Derivatives

    3. The Permeability of Cells for Creatinine

    4. The Permeability of Cells for Monohydric Alcohols and Certain Other Non-electrolytes

    5. The Permeability of Cells for Surface-active Substances (Monohydric Alcohols, Aldehydes, Ketones, Derivatives of Monohydric Alcohols, etc.)

    B. Plant Cells and Micro-organisms

    6. The Permeability of Plant Cells and Micro-organisms for Nonelectrolytes

    7. Conclusions

    Chapter VI. The Permeability of Cells for Certain Organic Acids (Amino Acids, Ascorbic Acid, etc.)

    1. The Permeability of Cells for Amino Acids

    Formed Elements of the Blood

    Muscle and Nerve Fibres, Cells of Other Tissues and Organs, Micro-organisms

    2. The Permeability of Cells for Ascorbic Acid

    Formed Elements of the Blood

    Cells of Other Tissues and Organs

    3. The Permeability of Cells for Pyruvic Acid

    4. The Permeability of Cells for Uric Acid

    5. The Permeability of Cells for Fatty Acids

    6. Conclusions

    Chapter VII. The Permeability of Cells for Vital Dyes

    1. The Distribution of Vital Dyes between Unexcited and Undamaged Cells and the Medium

    2. The Distribution of Vital Dyes on Stimulation or Damage of Cells

    The Effect of Various Irritants on the Distribution of Vital Dyes

    The Distribution of Vital Dyes between Excited Cells and the Medium

    3. The Mechanism of the Distribution of Vital Dyes between Cells and their Surrounding Medium

    4. Conclusions

    Chapter VIII. The Permeability of Cells for Mineral Substances

    1. Introductory Remarks

    The Mineral Composition of Cells and of their Environment

    Extracellular Spaces

    2. The Permeability of Animal Cells for Salts

    The Permeability of Erythrocytes for Anions

    The Permeability of Erythrocytes for Cations

    The Permeability of Leucocytes for Ions

    The Permeability of Muscle Fibres for Cations

    The Permeability of Muscle Fibres for Anions

    The Permeability of Smooth Muscle Fibres for Ions

    The Permeability of Nerve Fibres for Ions

    The Permeability of Epithelial, Nerve and Other Cells of Animal Organisms for Ions

    3. The Permeability of Plant Cells for Ions

    4. Conclusions

    Chapter IX. The Mechanism of the Distribution of Mineral Substances between the Cell and Medium

    1. The Membrane Theory of the Distribution of Mineral Substances between the Cell and Medium

    The Donnan Principle of the Distribution of Mineral Ions

    The Hypothesis of the Active Transport of Ions and the Sodium Pump

    Critique of the Hypothesis of Membrane Pumps

    2. The State of Mineral Substances in the Protoplasm according to the Sorptional Theory of Cell Permeability

    Anion Deficit

    Bound and Dissolved Mineral Substances in the Protoplasm

    The Redistribution of Ions between Cell and Medium upon Excitation

    3. The Role of the Sorptional Factors in the Mechanism of the Distribution of Inorganic Substances between Cells and Medium

    4. On the Nature of the Selective Accumulation of Potassium in Cells

    5. Conclusions

    Chapter X. Metabolism and Cell Permeability

    1. The Relation between Metabolism and Cell Permeability

    2. The Temperature Dependence of the Absorption of Substances by Cells

    3. The Effect of Respiration, Metabolic Inhibitors and Other Factors on the Permeability of Cells

    4. Conclusions

    Chapter XI. The Bioelectric Properties of Cells

    1. On the Nature of Bioelectric Potentials

    A. The Membrane Theory

    B. The Phase Theory

    C. Bioelectric Potentials and Cellular Metabolism

    2. The Electrical Conductivity of Cells; Impedance

    3. Conclusions

    Chapter XII. The Protective Action of Non-electrolytes against Damage of Live Matter Caused by Dilute Saline Media

    Conclusion

    References

    Author Index

    Subject Index

    Other Titles in the Division




Product details

  • No. of pages: 564
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Pergamon 1966
  • Published: January 1, 1966
  • Imprint: Pergamon
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483222615

About the Author

A.S. Troshin

About the Editors

P. Alexander

Z. M. Bacq

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