Probiotics in The Prevention and Management of Human Diseases

Probiotics in The Prevention and Management of Human Diseases

A Scientific Perspective

1st Edition - December 2, 2021

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  • Editors: Mitesh Dwivedi, N. Amaresan, A Sankaranaryanan, Helen Kemp
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128237342
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128237335

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Description

Probiotics in The Prevention and Management of Human Diseases: A Scientific Perspective addresses the use of probiotics and their mechanistic aspects in diverse human diseases. In particular, the mechanistic aspects of how these probiotics are involved in mitigating disease symptoms (novel approaches and immune-mechanisms induced by Probiotics), clinical trials of certain probiotics, and animal model studies will be presented through this book. In addition, the book covers the role of probiotics in prevention and management aspects of crucial human diseases, including multidrug resistant infections, hospital acquired infections, allergic conditions, autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, neurological disorders, and cancers. Finally, the book addresses the use of probiotics as vaccine adjuvants and as a solution for nutritional health problems and describes the challenges of using probiotics in management of human disease conditions as well as their biosafety concerns. Intended for nutrition researchers, microbiologists, physiologists, and researchers in related disciplines as well as students studying these topics require a resource that addresses the specific role of probiotics in the prevention and management of human disease.

Key Features

  • Contains information on the use of probiotics in significant human diseases, including antibiotic resistant microbial infections
  • Presents novel applications of probiotics, including their use in vaccine adjuvants and concept of pharmabiotics
  • Includes case studies and human clinical trials for probiotics in diverse disease conditions and explores the role of probiotics in mitigation of the symptoms of disease

Readership

Nutrition researchers, microbiologists, physiologists, and researchers in related disciplines as well as students studying these topics

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • About the editors
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. The concept of probiotics, prebiotics, postbiotics, synbiotics, nutribiotics, and pharmabiotics
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Probiotics
  • 1.3 Prebiotics
  • 1.4 Synbiotics
  • 1.5 Postbiotics
  • 1.6 Nutribiotics
  • 1.7 Pharmabiotics
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Food or pharma: the name does make a difference
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Probiotics: a substance or a product?
  • 2.3 The various regulatory statuses applicable to products containing “probiotics”
  • 2.4 Comparative summary
  • 2.5 Conclusion: the name does make a difference
  • Conflict of interest
  • Notice
  • References
  • Chapter 3. The role of probiotics in maintaining immune homeostasis
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Conlusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Effect of intestinal microbiome, antibiotics, and probiotics in the prevention and management of ulcerative colitis
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The role of intestinal microbiota in the development of bowel diseases
  • 4.3 General characteristics of drugs used in bowel diseases
  • 4.4 Modification of intestinal microbiome
  • 4.5 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Probiotics in the prevention and management of necrotizing enterocolitis
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 The microbiome, dysbiosis, and NEC
  • 5.3 Most relevant mechanisms of probiotic action in the preterm
  • 5.4 Probiotics and prevention of NEC
  • 5.5 Safety aspects of probiotics
  • 5.6 Conclusions and challenges for future research
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Probiotics in the prevention and management of irritable bowel syndrome
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Probiotics in prevention and management of IBS
  • 6.3 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Probiotics in the prevention and treatment of diarrheal disease
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Diarrheal diseases
  • 7.3 Probiotics in prevention and treatment of diarrheal diseases
  • 7.4 Mode of action of probiotics
  • 7.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Probiotics in the prevention and treatment of atopic skin diseases
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Etiology and pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis
  • 8.3 Relationship between gut microbiota and atopic dermatitis
  • 8.4 Intervention of probiotics in atopic dermatitis
  • 8.5 Future perspectives of probiotics in prevention and treatment of AD
  • 8.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Probiotics for the treatment of other skin conditions (acne, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, wounds, and skin cancer)
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Acne vulgaris
  • 9.2 Psoriasis
  • 9.3 Seborrheic dermatitis
  • 9.4 Wound healing
  • 9.5 Skin cancer
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Probiotics in the prevention and management of allergic diseases (asthma and allergic rhinitis)
  • abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Prevention of asthma
  • 10.3 Probiotics for the treatment of asthma
  • 10.4 Probiotics for the prevention of allergic rhinitis
  • 10.5 Probiotics for the treatment of allergic rhinitis
  • 10.6 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • Funding
  • Conflicts of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Prenatal and neonatal probiotic intake in pediatric allergy
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Safety of probiotics and prebiotics
  • 11.3 Probiotics, prebiotics, and immunity
  • 11.4 Microbiota and allergic disorders
  • 11.5 Mother’s microbiome and child health
  • 11.6 Clinical studies
  • 11.7 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Probiotics and prebiotics in the suppression of autoimmune diseases
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Autoimmune diseases
  • 12.3 Relationship between gut microbiota and immune system
  • 12.4 Gut microbiota associated with autoimmune diseases
  • 12.5 Beneficial role of probiotics in the suppression of autoimmune diseases
  • 12.6 Future perspectives
  • 12.7 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention and management of human cancers (colon cancer, stomach cancer, breast cancer, and cervix cancer)
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Probiotics and prebiotics in stomach cancer
  • 13.3 Probiotics and prebiotics in colon cancer
  • 13.4 Probiotics and prebiotics in breast cancer
  • 13.5 Probiotics and prebiotics in cervical cancer
  • 13.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Probiotics in mitigation of food allergies and lactose intolerance
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction of probiotics and the gut microbiome
  • 14.2 Food allergies and lactose intolerance
  • 14.3 Lactose intolerance
  • 14.4 Role of probiotics in mitigation of food allergies and lactose intolerance
  • 14.5 Dietary management strategies
  • 14.6 Therapeutic applications
  • 14.7 Intake of probiotics
  • 14.8 Future prospective of probiotic in food allergies
  • 14.9 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Probiotics in the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia
  • 15.3 Clostridium difficile infection
  • 15.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Role of probiotics in urological health
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Vaginal microbiota
  • 16.3 Commensal microbial flora and preventing UTI
  • 16.4 Scope of the problem
  • 16.5 Urinary tract infection
  • 16.6 Bacterial vaginosis
  • 16.7 Yeast vaginitis
  • 16.8 Modes of administration of probiotics
  • 16.9 What does the evidence say?
  • 16.10 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17. Role of probiotics in prevention and treatment of Candida vaginitis and Bacterial vaginosis
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Healthy vaginal microflora and probiotic lactobacilli
  • 17.3 Vaginitis (vaginal infection)
  • 17.4 Probiotic roles in the prevention and treatment of vaginal infection
  • 17.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of oral diseases
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Role of probiotics in prevention and treatment of dental caries
  • 18.3 Role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases
  • 18.4 Role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of halitosis
  • 18.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Role of probiotics in infections with multidrug-resistant organisms
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Probiotics
  • 19.3 General mechanisms of actions of probiotics against MDR bacteria
  • 19.4 Probiotics in organ-specific resistant infections
  • 19.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Probiotics in the prevention and treatment of infections with Helicobacter pylori, Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and Rotavirus
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Probiotics and their health implications
  • 20.3 Infections caused by Helicobacter pylori, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and rotavirus
  • 20.4 Helicobacter pylori
  • 20.5 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
  • 20.6 Rotavirus
  • 20.7 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Role of probiotics in the management of fungal infections
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Probiotics
  • 21.3 Probiotics in fungal diseases
  • 21.4 Future perspectives
  • 21.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 22. Role of probiotics in the prevention and management of diabetes and obesity
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Pathophysiology and risk factors of diabetes mellitus and obesity
  • 22.3 Probiotics for the management of diabetes and obesity
  • 22.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 23. Probiotics in the prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases with focus on dyslipidemia
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Probiotic bacteria
  • 23.3 Probiotic yeasts
  • 23.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24. Gut–brain axis: role of probiotics in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Colonization of the intestinal ecosystem in early life and its evolution
  • 24.3 Gut microbiota
  • 24.4 What are probiotics?
  • 24.5 Psychobiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics
  • 24.6 Autism and probiotics
  • 24.7 ASD and GI disorders
  • 24.8 The gut–brain axis
  • 24.9 Neurodevelopmental disorders
  • 24.10 Is the gut microbiota of children with autism spectrum disorder different?
  • 24.11 Literature evidence in ASD
  • 24.12 Newer techniques involving microbiota
  • 24.13 ADHD
  • 24.14 Other neurodevelopmental disorders
  • 24.15 Future perspectives
  • 24.16 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 25. Probiotics in the prevention and control of foodborne diseases in humans
  • Abstract
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Foodborne diseases
  • 25.3 Probiotics
  • 25.4 Antimicrobial potential of probiotics against foodborne pathogens
  • 25.5 Probiotics mechanisms of action in the control and prevention of foodborne pathogens
  • 25.6 Supplementation of probiotics in food materials
  • 25.7 Delivery system of probiotics
  • 25.8 The safety of probiotic therapy in host
  • 25.9 Health significance of probiotics in the prevention of foodborne diseases
  • 25.10 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 26. Role of probiotics in the management of respiratory infections
  • Abstract
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Respiratory tract infections
  • 26.3 In search of new therapeutic strategies: microbiota and gut-lung axis
  • 26.4 Pulmonary microbiota in diseases
  • 26.5 History of probiotics
  • 26.6 Probiotic usage and safety
  • 26.7 Probiotic administration in respiratory infections
  • 26.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 27. The role of probiotics in nutritional health: probiotics as nutribiotics
  • Abstract
  • 27.1 Nutribiotics: ways to improve the nutritional status
  • 27.2 Nutritional health benefits of probiotics and postbiotics
  • 27.3 Encapsulation technology for the development of functional ingredients
  • 27.4 Current market of probiotics and future perspectives
  • 27.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 28. Role of immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria as vaccine adjuvants
  • Abstract
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 Vaccine adjuvants
  • 28.3 Probiotic lactic acid bacteria
  • 28.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 29. Probiotics: past, present, and future challenges
  • Abstract
  • 29.1 Probiotics—the concept
  • 29.2 Probiotics—modern trends
  • 29.3 Viability of probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and their secondary reproduction: probiotic concentration
  • 29.4 Dose of probiotics
  • 29.5 Safety of probiotic bacteria
  • 29.6 Health effects of probiotics
  • 29.7 Probiotics and metabolic syndrome
  • 29.8 Probiotics and urogenital infections
  • 29.9 Probiotics and immunity
  • 29.10 Probiotics and mental illness called Plus Ultra
  • 29.11 The next 45 years
  • 29.12 Summary
  • 29.13 Probiotics and Covid-19: data supporting the use of probiotics to prevent Covid-19
  • 29.14 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 30. Probiotics: health safety considerations
  • Abstract
  • 30.1 Introduction
  • 30.2 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Declaration of competing interest
  • References
  • Chapter 31. Probiotics: current regulatory aspects of probiotics for use in different disease conditions
  • Abstract
  • 31.1 Introduction
  • 31.2 Current regulation bodies that include probiotics
  • 31.3 Regulations for use of probiotics in gastrointestinal diseases
  • 31.4 Regulations for use of probiotics in diseases other than gastrointestinal diseases
  • 31.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 530
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 2, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128237342
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128237335

About the Editors

Mitesh Dwivedi

Dr. Mitesh Kumar Dwivedi has completed PhD from Department of Biochemistry, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara (2013); M.Sc. Microbiology from University of Mysore (2006) and B.Sc. Microbiology from Sardar Patel University (2004). Since 2014, he is serving as Assistant Professor at C. G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University. He has published 42 research papers in reputed journals and written 5 book chapters. His research interests include exploring the immunological, genetic causes and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases such as Vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroidism, etc. and use of probiotics in human health and diseases.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University

N. Amaresan

Dr. N. Amaresan is an Assistant Professor at C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, Gujarat. He is a Microbiologist, having obtained his Ph.D., degree on endophytic PGP bacteria from Bharathidasan University, Tamil Nadu. Dr. N. Amaresan has over thirteen years of experience in teaching & research and made several original and novel discoveries in various allied fields of microbiology mainly plant-microbe interactions, bioremediation, plant pathology and others. For his original discoveries on agriculturally important microorganisms he has been awarded young scientist awards by Association of Microbiologists of India and National Academy of Biological Sciences. He also been awarded visiting scientist fellowship from National Academy of India to learn advanced techniques. He also deposited over 380 bacterial 16S rDNA and fungal ITS rDNA sequences in the Genbank (NCBI, EMBL & DDBJ) and also preserved over 150 microbial germplasm in various culture collection centres of India.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, Gujarat, India

A Sankaranaryanan

Dr. A. Sankaranarayanan is working as an Assistant Professor in Microbiology, C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, Gujarat from 2015 onwards. Prior to his present position he served as an Assistant Professor & Head, Department of Microbiology, K.S.R. College of Arts & Science, Tiruchengode, Tamil Nadu from 2002-2015. He has experience in the fields of antimicrobial activity, antibacterial potential of nanoparticles and environmental microbiology. His current research focus is on antibacterial potential of herbal products against multi drug resistant microbial pathogens and pesticide / insecticide degradation by bacteria and fungi in freshwater ecosystem.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor in Microbiology, C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, Gujarat

Helen Kemp

Dr Helen Kemp completed her PhD in Microbiology at the University of Warwick and the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research, Salisbury, in 1988. Since 1989, she has worked at the University of Sheffield as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology and then in the Department of Oncology and Metabolism. She has a long-standing interest in the autoimmune and genetic aspects of the depigmenting disease vitiligo and has international collaborations on projects to profile autoantibody responses against melanocytes in melanoma, vitiligo and alopecia areata. She is also interested in characterizing autoimmune responses against the calcium-sensing receptor in patients with parathyroid autoimmunity. She has published more than 70 research papers and has contributed to books and review articles. She has been on the British Skin Foundation Grant Review Board and served as Section Editor for the British Journal of Dermatology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, UK

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  • Mansi Fri Oct 22 2021

    Probiotics and human dieases

    Egerly awaiting for this book