Practical Petrophysics - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444632708, 9780444632715

Practical Petrophysics, Volume 62

1st Edition

Series Volume Editors: Martin Kennedy
eBook ISBN: 9780444632715
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444632708
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 26th May 2015
Page Count: 420
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Table of Contents

  • Series Editor’s Preface
    • Preface
      • Chapter 1: Introduction
        • Abstract
        • 1.1. What is petrophysics?
        • 1.2. Early history
        • 1.3. Petrophysical data
        • 1.4. Quantitative description of mixtures
        • 1.5. The practice of petrophysics and petrophysics in practice
        • 1.6. The petrophysical model
        • 1.7. Physical properties of rocks
        • 1.8. Fundamentals of log analysis
        • 1.9. A word on nomenclature
        • 1.10. The future of the profession
      • Chapter 2: Petrophysical Properties
        • Abstract
        • 2.1. Introduction
        • 2.2. Porosity
        • 2.3. Saturation
        • 2.4. Permeability
        • 2.5. Shale and clay volume (Vshale and Vclay)
        • 2.6. Relationships between properties
        • 2.7. Heterogeneity and anisotropy
        • 2.8. Net, pay and averaging
        • 2.9. Unconventional reservoirs
      • Chapter 3: Core and Other Real Rock Measurements
        • Abstract
        • 3.1. Introduction
        • 3.2. Types of core
        • 3.3. Core measurements
        • 3.4. Preparation for analysis
        • 3.5. Core porosity
        • 3.6. Grain density
        • 3.7. Permeability
        • 3.8. Special core analysis
        • 3.9. Oil and gas shales
        • 3.10. Cuttings
      • Chapter 4: Logs Part I: General Characteristics and Passive Measurements
        • Abstract
        • 4.1. Introduction
        • 4.2. Wireline and logging while drilling
        • 4.3. Characteristics of logs
        • 4.4. Volume of investigation of logs
        • 4.5. Passive log measurements
      • Chapter 5: Logs Part II: Porosity, Resistivity and Other Tools
        • Abstract
        • 5.1. Introduction
        • 5.2. Density tools
        • 5.3. Neutron logs
        • 5.4. Sonic
        • 5.5. Nuclear magnetic resonance
        • 5.6. Resistivity
        • 5.7. More uses of neutrons: geochemical logs
        • 5.8. Environmental corrections
        • 5.9. Conclusions
      • Chapter 6: Introduction to Log Analysis: Shale Volume and Parameter Picking
        • Abstract
        • 6.1. Introduction
        • 6.2. Fundamentals: equations and parameters
        • 6.3. Preparation
        • 6.4. Parameter picking and displaying logs
        • 6.5. Shale volume
        • 6.6. Combining shale volume curves
      • Chapter 7: Log Analysis Part I: Porosity
        • Abstract
        • 7.1. Introduction to porosity
        • 7.2. Porosity calculation fundamentals
        • 7.3. Single log porosity methods
        • 7.4. Methods involving more than one input curve
        • 7.5. Nuclear magnetic resonance
        • 7.6. Integration with core data
        • 7.7. Oil and gas shales
      • Chapter 8: Log Analysis Part II: Water Saturation
        • Abstract
        • 8.1. Introduction
        • 8.2. Basic principles
        • 8.3. Water saturation from resistivity
        • 8.4. Back to the rocks. What controls the saturation parameters?
        • 8.5. Uncertainty and error analysis
        • 8.6. Conductive minerals and shaly-sand equations
        • 8.7. Conclusions
      • Chapter 9: Hydrocarbon Corrections
        • Abstract
        • 9.1. Introduction
        • 9.2. Integrating density porosity with Archie saturation
        • 9.3. Complications and refinements
        • 9.4. The neutron log re-visited
      • Chapter 10: Fluid Distribution
        • Abstract
        • 10.1. Introduction
        • 10.2. Gravitational forces and buoyancy
        • 10.3. Capillary forces
        • 10.4. Water in porous rocks
        • 10.5. Wettability
        • 10.6. Interfacial tension and capillary pressure
        • 10.7. Capillary pressure curves
        • 10.8. Putting it all together: real rocks and real fluids
        • 10.9. Developing a saturation-height function
        • 10.10. The free water level and formation testers
        • 10.11. Conclusions
      • Chapter 11: Permeability Re-visited
        • Abstract
        • 11.1. Introduction
        • 11.2. Characteristics of permeability
        • 11.3. Permeability data
        • 11.4. Permeability prediction
        • 11.5. Kozeny–Carmen equation
        • 11.6. Permeability as a function of porosity and irreducible water saturation
        • 11.7. Analogues and rock types
        • 11.8. More log-based methods
        • 11.9. A case study
      • Chapter 12: Complex Lithology
        • Abstract
        • 12.1. Introduction
        • 12.2. Photo-electric factor
        • 12.3. Density–neutron cross-plot
        • 12.4. Case study: limestone–dolomite systems
        • 12.5. Geochemical tools
      • Chapter 13: Thin Bed Pays: Dealing with the Limitations of Log Resolution
        • Abstract
        • 13.1. Introduction
        • 13.2. The problem of log resolution
        • 13.3. Thomas-Stieber method
        • 13.4. Resistivity and saturation
        • 13.5. Image logs
        • 13.6. NMR logs
      • Chapter 14: Geophysical Applications
        • Abstract
        • 14.1. Introduction
        • 14.2. Integrated transit time and the time–depth curve
        • 14.3. Sonic calibration
        • 14.4. Fluid substitution
        • 14.5. Borehole gravity surveys
        • 14.6. Deep reading resistivity surveys
        • 14.7. Conclusions
      • Chapter 15: Epilogue: High-Angle Wells
        • Abstract
        • 15.1. Introduction
        • 15.2. Logging high-angle wells
        • 15.3. Formation anisotropy and thin beds
        • 15.4. Conclusions
      • Bibliography
        • Index

          Description

          Practical Petrophysics looks at both the principles and practice of petrophysics in understanding petroleum reservoirs. It concentrates on the tools and techniques in everyday use, and addresses all types of reservoirs, including unconventionals.

          The book provides useful explanations on how to perform fit for purpose interpretations of petrophysical data, with emphasis on what the interpreter needs and what is practically possible with real data. Readers are not limited to static reservoir properties for input to volumetrics, as the book also includes applications such as reservoir performance, seismic attribute, geo-mechanics, source rock characterization, and more.

          Key Features

          • Principles and practice are given equal emphasis
          • Simple models and concepts explain the underlying principles
          • Extensive use of contemporary, real-life examples

          Readership

          All sub-surface professionals who are users of petrophysical interpretations. Graduate petroleum engineers and geologists, operations geologists, and drilling engineers


          Details

          No. of pages:
          420
          Language:
          English
          Copyright:
          © Elsevier 2015
          Published:
          Imprint:
          Elsevier
          eBook ISBN:
          9780444632715
          Hardcover ISBN:
          9780444632708

          About the Series Volume Editors

          Martin Kennedy Series Volume Editor

          Martin Kennedy started his career as a wireline logging engineer with Schlumberger and has been involved in some aspect of petrophysics ever since. After short spells working in research and government, he joined British Gas in 1991 and moved to Enterprise Oil five years later. He was Chief Petrophysicist at Enterprise from 1997 until the Shell takeover when he joined Petro-Canada, also as Chief Petrophysicist. He joined Woodside and moved to Perth in 2003 and was appointed Chief Petrophysicist eighteen months later. Over the next five years he worked on most of Woodside’s Australian and Overseas assets and at the same time implemented a range of improvements to Woodside’s Petrophysics capability. In 2008 he left to work as an independent consultant and now supports a wide range of organisations working throughout the world. His career has spanned everything from field developments to quick-look evaluations supporting new venture activity, operations and unitisation. He has worked in many of the classic petroleum provinces and has a lot of experience in what are generally considered the more difficult areas of petrophysics such as carbonates, fractured reservoirs and tight gas. Martin holds a BSc degree in Chemistry from Bristol University and a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Edinburgh University.

          Affiliations and Expertise

          Nautilus/IHRDC, Australia