Practical Dermatopathology

Practical Dermatopathology

3rd Edition - February 2, 2021

Write a review

  • Author: Ronald Rapini
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323461290
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323417884

Purchase options

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Written from the perspective of both the histopathologist and clinician, Practical Dermatopathology, 3rd Edition, allows you to search by disease or pathologic feature to quickly locate key criteria and a differential diagnosis. Practical and portable, Practical Dermatopathology is your ideal high-yield microscope companion!

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Acknowledgments
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Clinical and Pathologic Findings with Differential Diagnostic Lists
  • A: Overview of clinical findings
  • B: Overview of pathologic findings
  • C: Differential diagnostic lists
  • Acanthosis (see Hyperplasia of epidermis, 1.61)
  • Erythema (see red)
  • Hyperpigmentation (see Brown)
  • Chapter 2: Eczematous and Papulosquamous Diseases
  • 2.1: Eczema (eczematous dermatitis)
  • 2.2: Contact dermatitis
  • 2.3: Lichen simplex chronicus and prurigo nodularis
  • 2.4: Pityriasis rosea (PR)
  • 2.5: Lichen striatus
  • 2.6: Pityriasis alba
  • 2.7: Flegel’s disease (hyperkeratosis lenticularis perstans)
  • 2.8: Psoriasis
  • 2.9: Parapsoriasis
  • 2.10: Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP)
  • 2.11: Lichen planus (LP)
  • 2.12: Lichen nitidus
  • 2.13: Keratosis lichenoides chronica (Nekam’s disease, lichen ruber moniliformis)
  • 2.14: Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA, Mucha-Habermann disease)
  • 2.15: Palmoplantar keratoderma (hyperkeratosis palmaris et plantaris)
  • Chapter 3: Reactive Erythemas
  • 3.1: Urticaria
  • 3.2: Erythema multiforme (EM)
  • 3.3: Erythema annulare centrifugum (EAC)
  • 3.4: Erythema gyratum repens (EGR)
  • 3.5: Drug eruptions
  • 3.6: Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP, polymorphous eruption of pregnancy, PEP)
  • 3.7: Sweet’s syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis)
  • 3.8: Wells syndrome (eosinophilic cellulitis)
  • 3.9: Erythema ab igne
  • 3.10: Livedo reticularis and cutis marmarata
  • 3.11: Erythema dyschromicum perstans (ashy dermatosis, dermatitis cenicienta)
  • 3.12: Chilblains (perniosis)
  • 3.13: Erythromelalgia (erythermalgia)
  • Chapter 4: Vasculitis and Other Purpuric Diseases
  • 4.1: Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV, neutrophilic vasculitis, necrotizing vasculitis)
  • 4.2: Granuloma faciale (GF)
  • 4.3: Erythema elevatum diutinum (EED)
  • 4.4: Polyarteritis nodosa (periarteritis nodosa, PAN)
  • 4.5: Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS; allergic granulomatous angiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, EGPA)
  • 4.6: Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG; granulomatosis with polyangiitis, GPA)
  • 4.7: Lymphocytic vasculitis
  • 4.8: Purpura pigmentosa chronica (progressive pigmentary purpura, capillaritis)
  • 4.9: Cryoglobulinemia
  • 4.10: Degos disease (malignant atrophic papulosis)
  • 4.11: Behçet’s syndrome (Adamantiades–Behçet’s disease)
  • 4.12: Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG)
  • 4.13: Atrophie blanche (segmental hyalinizing vasculopathy, livedoid vasculopathy)
  • 4.14: Coagulopathies
  • 4.15: Solar purpura
  • 4.16: Thrombotic and embolic diseases
  • 4.17: Scurvy
  • 4.18: Coumarin-induced necrosis
  • 4.19: Buerger’s disease (thromboangiitis obliterans)
  • Chapter 5: Intraepidermal Vesicular and Pustular Diseases
  • 5.1: Acropustulosis of infancy
  • 5.2: Transient neonatal pustular melanosis
  • 5.3: Erythema toxicum neonatorum
  • 5.4: Pemphigus
  • 5.5: Hailey–Hailey disease (benign familial pemphigus)
  • 5.6: Grover’s disease (transient acantholytic dermatosis, TAD)
  • 5.7: Friction blister
  • Chapter 6: Subepidermal Vesicular Diseases
  • 6.1: Bullous pemphigoid (BP)
  • 6.2: Mucous membrane pemphigoid (cicatricial pemphigoid)
  • 6.3: Pemphigoid gestationis (herpes gestationis, HG)
  • 6.4: Linear IgA bullous dermatosis
  • 6.5: Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH)
  • 6.6: Epidermolysis bullosa (EB)
  • 6.7: Burns
  • 6.8: Ischemic bullae
  • 6.9: Bullosis diabeticorum
  • Chapter 7: Noninfectious Granulomas
  • 7.1: Granuloma annulare (GA)
  • 7.2: Necrobiosis lipoidica
  • 7.3: Rheumatoid nodule
  • 7.4: Actinic granuloma of O’Brien (annular elastolytic granuloma)
  • 7.5: Sarcoidosis
  • 7.6: Foreign body granuloma
  • 7.7: Cheilitis granulomatosa
  • 7.8: Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH)
  • 7.9: Xanthoma
  • 7.10: Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG)
  • 7.11: Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG)
  • 7.12: Verruciform xanthoma (VX)
  • 7.13: Other rare histiocytoses
  • Chapter 8: Deposition and Metabolic Diseases
  • 8.1: Porphyria
  • 8.2: Colloid milium
  • 8.3: Lipoid proteinosis (hyalinosis cutis et mucosae, Urbach–Wiethe disease)
  • 8.4: Amyloidosis
  • 8.5: Gout
  • 8.6: Generalized myxedema
  • 8.7: Pretibial myxedema
  • 8.8: Papular mucinosis (lichen myxedematosus)
  • 8.9: Digital mucous cyst (digital myxoid pseudocyst, digital synovial cyst)
  • 8.10: Mucocele (mucous cyst of the mouth)
  • 8.11: Focal mucinosis of the skin
  • 8.12: Scleredema of Buschke
  • 8.13: Reticular erythematous mucinosis syndrome (REM syndrome)
  • 8.14: Mucopolysaccharidoses
  • 8.15: Calcinosis cutis
  • 8.16: Ochronosis
  • 8.17: Hemochromatosis
  • 8.18: Argyria
  • 8.19: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy, scleromyxedema-like fibromucinosis of renal disease)
  • 8.20: Miscellaneous deposition diseases
  • Chapter 9: Alterations of Connective Tissue
  • 9.1: Solar elastosis
  • 9.2: Radiodermatitis
  • 9.3: Scleroderma
  • 9.4: Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini
  • 9.5: Lichen sclerosus (lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, LS&A)
  • 9.6: Progeria
  • 9.7: Pachydermoperiostosis
  • 9.8: Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, Gronblad–Strandberg syndrome)
  • 9.9: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS)
  • 9.10: Cutis laxa
  • 9.11: Anetoderma (macular atrophy)
  • 9.12: Kyrle’s disease (hyperkeratosis follicularis et parafollicularis in cutem penetrans)
  • 9.13: Elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS)
  • 9.14: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC)
  • 9.15: Mid-dermal elastolysis
  • Chapter 10: Adnexal Inflammatory Diseases
  • 10.1: Acne
  • 10.2: Folliculitis
  • 10.3: Perforating folliculitis
  • 10.4: Trichostasis spinulosa
  • 10.5: Keratosis pilaris (KP) and lichen spinulosus
  • 10.6: Miliaria
  • 10.7: Fox–Fordyce disease (apocrine miliaria)
  • 10.8: Follicular mucinosis (MF, alopecia mucinosa)
  • 10.9: Alopecia areata (AA)
  • 10.10: Pseudopelade of Brocq
  • 10.11: Follicular trauma
  • 10.12: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA)
  • 10.13: Lipedematous alopecia
  • 10.14: Telogen effluvium (TE)
  • 10.15: Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis
  • Chapter 11: Some Genodermatoses
  • 11.1: Ichthyosis
  • 11.2: Ectodermal dysplasia
  • 11.3: Darier’s disease (Darier–White disease, keratosis follicularis)
  • 11.4: Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC)
  • 11.5: Rothmund–Thomson syndrome (poikiloderma congenitale)
  • 11.6: Incontinentia pigmenti (IP, Bloch–Sulzberger syndrome)
  • 11.7: Hypomelanosis of Ito (incontinentia pigmenti achromians)
  • 11.8: Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia)
  • 11.9: Albinism (oculocutaneous albinism)
  • 11.10: Bloom syndrome (congenital telangiectatic erythema)
  • 11.11: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)
  • 11.12: Ataxia–telangiectasia (Louis–Bar syndrome)
  • 11.13: Other genetic conditions
  • Chapter 12: Bacterial Diseases
  • 12.1: Impetigo
  • 12.2: Toxin-induced bacterial diseases
  • 12.3: Infectious cellulitis
  • 12.4: Anthrax
  • 12.5: Corynebacterial infections
  • 12.6: Tularemia
  • 12.7: Chancroid
  • 12.8: Granuloma inguinale (donovanosis)
  • 12.9: Rhinoscleroma
  • 12.10: Tuberculosis
  • 12.11: Atypical mycobacterial infections
  • 12.12: Hansen’s disease (leprosy)
  • 12.13: Syphilis
  • 12.14: Borreliosis
  • 12.15: Bartonella infections
  • 12.16: Actinomycosis
  • 12.17: Nocardiosis
  • 12.18: Gonococcemia
  • 12.19: Meningococcemia
  • 12.20: Ecthyma gangrenosum
  • 12.21: Malakoplakia
  • 12.22: Brucellosis
  • 12.23: Yersiniosis
  • Chapter 13: Fungal Diseases
  • 13.1: Dermatophytosis (tinea)
  • 13.2: Tinea versicolor (TV, pityriasis versicolor)
  • 13.3: Tinea nigra
  • 13.4: Candidiasis (moniliasis, candidosis)
  • 13.5: Cryptococcosis
  • 13.6: Coccidioidomycosis
  • 13.7: South American blastomycosis (paracoccidioidomycosis)
  • 13.8: North American blastomycosis
  • 13.9: Histoplasmosis
  • 13.10: Chromomycosis (chromoblastomycosis)
  • 13.11: Sporotrichosis
  • 13.12: Zygomycosis (phycomycosis, mucormycosis)
  • 13.13: Aspergillosis
  • 13.14: Mycetoma (madura foot, maduromycosis)
  • 13.15: Rhinosporidiosis
  • 13.16: Lobomycosis (Lobo’s disease, lacaziosis, keloidal blastomycosis)
  • 13.17: Pheohyphomycosis
  • 13.18: Hyalohyphomycosis
  • 13.19: Talaromycosis (formerly Penicilliosis)
  • Chapter 14: Viral, Rickettsial, and Chlamydial Diseases
  • 14.1: Human papillomavirus infection (HPV, viral wart, verruca)
  • 14.2: Herpes simplex (HSV, herpes type 1 and 2) and varicella zoster (VZV, herpes type 3)
  • 14.3: Smallpox and vaccinia
  • 14.4: Molluscum contagiosum
  • 14.5: Orf and milker’s nodule (collectively called farmyard pox)
  • 14.6: Coxsackie virus infection
  • 14.7: Viral exanthems
  • 14.8: Epstein–Barr virus infection (EBV, herpes type 4)
  • 14.9: Cytomegalovirus infection (CMV, herpes type 5)
  • 14.10: Kawasaki’s disease
  • 14.11: Gianotti–Crosti syndrome (papular acrodermatitis of childhood)
  • 14.12: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection
  • 14.13: Rickettsial diseases
  • 14.14: Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV)
  • 14.15: Psittacosis
  • 14.16: Trichodysplasia spinulosa
  • Chapter 15: Parasitic Diseases
  • 15.1: Leishmaniasis
  • 15.2: Protothecosis
  • 15.3: Cysticercosis
  • 15.4: Dirofilariasis
  • 15.5: Onchocerciasis
  • 15.6: Cutaneous larval migrans
  • 15.7: Arthropod bites and stings (arthropod assaults)
  • 15.8: Demodicosis
  • 15.9: Scabies
  • 15.10: Myiasis
  • 15.11: Tungiasis
  • 15.12: Pneumocystosis
  • 15.13: Amebiasis
  • 15.14: Trypanosomiasis
  • 15.15: Toxoplasmosis
  • 15.16: Schistosomiasis
  • Chapter 16: Panniculitis
  • 16.1: Erythema nodosum (EN)
  • 16.2: Weber–Christian disease (relapsing febrile nodular non-suppurative panniculitis)
  • 16.3: Cold panniculitis
  • 16.4: Sclerema neonatorum
  • 16.5: Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn
  • 16.6: Erythema induratum (nodular vasculitis)
  • 16.7: Superficial thrombophlebitis
  • 16.8: Pancreatic panniculitis
  • 16.9: Lipodermatosclerosis (hypodermitis sclerodermiformis, sclerosing panniculitis)
  • 16.10: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency panniculitis
  • 16.11: Lipodystrophy
  • Chapter 17: Other Non-neoplastic Diseases
  • 17.1: Acrodermatitis enteropathica
  • 17.2: Vitiligo
  • 17.3: Graft-versus-host disease (GVH, GVHD)
  • 17.4: Aplasia cutis congenita
  • 17.5: Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE)
  • 17.6: Lupus erythematosus (LE)
  • 17.7: Dermatomyositis
  • 17.8: Relapsing polychondritis
  • 17.9: Chondrodermatitis nodularis chronica helicis (CNCH, CNH)
  • 17.10: Other pigmentary anomalies
  • 17.11: Other mouth lesions
  • Chapter 18: Epithelial Neoplasms
  • 18.1: Epidermal nevus (linear epidermal nevus)
  • 18.2: Seborrheic keratosis (SK)
  • 18.3: Acrokeratosis verruciformis (AKV)
  • 18.4: Porokeratosis
  • 18.5: Acanthosis nigricans
  • 18.6: Clear cell acanthoma (pale cell acanthoma)
  • 18.7: Warty dyskeratoma
  • 18.8: Actinic keratosis (AK, solar keratosis)
  • 18.9: Arsenical keratosis
  • 18.10: Bowen’s disease (squamous cell carcinoma in situ, SCCis, intraepidermal SCC)
  • 18.11: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)
  • 18.12: Keratoacanthoma (KA)
  • 18.13: Paget’s disease
  • 18.14: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC)
  • 18.15: Onychomatricoma
  • Chapter 19: Cysts
  • 19.1: Follicular infundibular cyst (epidermal inclusion cyst, epidermoid cyst)
  • 19.2: Pilar cyst (trichilemmal cyst, isthmus-catagen cyst, wen)
  • 19.3: Dermoid cyst
  • 19.4: Vellus hair cyst
  • 19.5: Steatocystoma
  • 19.6: Cervical thymic cyst
  • 19.7: Cutaneous ciliated cyst
  • 19.8: Thyroglossal duct cyst
  • 19.9: Branchial cleft cyst
  • 19.10: Bronchogenic cyst
  • 19.11: Hidrocystoma (cystadenoma)
  • 19.12: Median raphe cyst of the penis
  • 19.13: Auricular pseudocyst
  • Chapter 20: Melanocytic Neoplasms
  • 20.1: Freckle (ephelis, plural is ephelides)
  • 20.2: Café-au-lait spot (café-au-lait macule, CALM)
  • 20.3: Lentigo simplex
  • 20.4: Solar lentigo
  • 20.5: Melanocytic nevus (poor synonyms: common mole, nevocellular nevus)
  • 20.6: Spitz nevus (antiquated synonyms: spindle and epithelioid cell nevus, S&E nevus, benign juvenile melanoma)
  • 20.7: Dysplastic nevus (DN, nevus with architectural disorder, NAD, NWAD, Clark nevus, atypical nevus)
  • 20.8: Blue nevus
  • 20.9: Nevus of Ota (nevus fuscocaeruleus ophthalmomaxillaris), nevus of Ito (nevus fuscocaeruleus acromiodeltoideus)
  • 20.10: Mongolian spot
  • 20.11: Melanoma
  • Chapter 21: Sebaceous Neoplasms
  • 21.1: Sebaceous hyperplasia
  • 21.2: Nevus sebaceus (organoid nevus)
  • 21.3: Sebaceous adenoma
  • 21.4: Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation
  • 21.5: Sebaceous carcinoma
  • Chapter 22: Follicular Neoplasms
  • 22.1: Trichofolliculoma
  • 22.2: Trichoepithelioma (TE)
  • 22.3: Pilomatrixoma (pilomatricoma, calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe)
  • 22.4: Proliferating pilar cyst (proliferating trichilemmal cyst, pilar tumor, proliferating follicular cystic neoplasm, giant hair matrix tumor)
  • 22.5: Trichilemmoma (tricholemmoma)
  • 22.6: Fibrofolliculoma and trichodiscoma
  • 22.7: Trichoblastoma (TBL)
  • Chapter 23: Sweat Gland Neoplasms
  • 23.1: Eccrine nevus and apocrine nevus
  • 23.2: Hidradenoma papilliferum
  • 23.3: Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP)
  • 23.4: Cylindroma of skin
  • 23.5: Nipple adenoma (erosive adenomatosis of the nipple, papillary adenoma of the nipple)
  • 23.6: Tubular apocrine adenoma
  • 23.7: Syringoma
  • 23.8: Papillary eccrine adenoma
  • 23.9: Nodular hidradenoma (eccrine acrospiroma)
  • 23.10: Eccrine poroma
  • 23.11: Eccrine spiradenoma
  • 23.12: Chondroid syringoma (mixed tumor of skin)
  • 23.13: Sweat gland carcinoma
  • Chapter 24: Myeloproliferative Disorders
  • 24.1: Mycosis fungoides (MF)
  • 24.2: Sezary syndrome
  • 24.3: Adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (ATLL)
  • 24.4: Subcutaneous T-cell lymphoma
  • 24.5: CD30  + lymphoproliferative disorders
  • 24.6: Natural killer (NK) cell and cytotoxic lymphomas
  • 24.7: Other T-cell lymphomas
  • 24.8: Primary cutaneous follicular center lymphoma (PCFCL)
  • 24.9: Primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma (PCMZL)
  • 24.10: Primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (DLBCLLT)
  • 24.11: Other B-cell lymphomas
  • 24.12: Multiple myeloma (plasma cell myeloma)
  • 24.13: Intravascular lymphoma
  • 24.14: Pseudolymphoma (cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, lymphocytoma cutis, lymphadenosis benigna cutis, Spiegler–Fendt sarcoid, Bäfverstedt syndrome)
  • 24.15: Hodgkin lymphoma
  • 24.16: Leukemia cutis
  • 24.17: Mastocytosis
  • 24.18: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH, histiocytosis X, Langerhans cell granulomatosis)
  • 24.19: Cutaneous extramedullary hematopoiesis
  • Chapter 25: Vascular Proliferations and Neoplasms
  • 25.1: Hemangioma and vascular malformation
  • 25.2: Angiokeratoma
  • 25.3: Pyogenic granuloma (PG, lobular capillary hemangioma)
  • 25.4: Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE, antiquated name: histiocytoid hemangioma)
  • 25.5: Glomus tumor
  • 25.6: Hemangiopericytoma
  • 25.7: Angiosarcoma
  • 25.8: Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH, Massońs pseudoangiosarcoma)
  • 25.9: Kaposi sarcoma (KS)
  • 25.10: Lymphangioma
  • Chapter 26: Neural Neoplasms
  • 26.1: Neurofibroma (NF)
  • 26.2: Schwannoma (neurilemmoma)
  • 26.3: Neuroma
  • 26.4: Granular cell tumor
  • 26.5: Heterotopic neuroglial tissue
  • 26.6: Heterotopic meningeal tissue
  • 26.7: Myxoid neurothekeoma (nerve sheath myxoma)
  • 26.8: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin, trabecular carcinoma)
  • 26.9: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST, malignant schwannoma, antiquated name neurofibrosarcoma)
  • Chapter 27: Fibrohistiocytic Proliferations and Neoplasms
  • 27.1: Dermatofibroma (DF, benign fibrous histiocytoma, subepidermal nodular fibrosis)
  • 27.2: Scar (cicatrix)
  • 27.3: Angiofibroma (fibrous papule)
  • 27.4: Acrochordon (skin tag, soft fibroma, fibroepithelial polyp, FEP)
  • 27.5: Acquired digital fibrokeratoma
  • 27.6: Connective tissue nevus
  • 27.7: Infantile digital fibromatosis (inclusion body fibromatosis)
  • 27.8: Nodular fasciitis (pseudosarcomatous fasciitis)
  • 27.9: Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (giant cell tumor of soft tissue)
  • 27.10: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP)
  • 27.11: Pleomorphic sarcoma (malignant fibrous histiocytoma, MFH)
  • 27.12: Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, superficial malignant fibrous histiocytoma, superficial pleomorphic sarcoma, pleomorphic dermal sarcoma)
  • 27.13: Fibrosarcoma
  • 27.14: Epithelioid sarcoma
  • 27.15: Fibromatosis
  • 27.16: Calcifying aponeurotic fibroma
  • 27.17: Myxoma (cutaneous myxoma, superficial angiomyxoma)
  • 27.18: Plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumor (PFT)
  • 27.19: Fibrous hamartoma of infancy
  • 27.20: Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT)
  • 27.21: Cutaneous PEComa
  • Chapter 28: Metastatic Neoplasms to Skin
  • 28.1: Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma
  • 28.2: Metastatic adenocarcinoma
  • 28.3: Metastatic breast carcinoma
  • 28.4: Metastatic renal cell carcinoma
  • 28.5: Metastatic small cell carcinoma
  • 28.6: Metastatic sarcoma
  • Chapter 29: Miscellaneous Remnants and Neoplasms
  • 29.1: Nevus lipomatosus
  • 29.2: Lipoma
  • 29.3: Benign lipoblastoma
  • 29.4: Hibernoma
  • 29.5: Liposarcoma
  • 29.6: Leiomyoma
  • 29.7: Leiomyosarcoma
  • 29.8: Osteoma cutis
  • 29.9: Cutaneous endometriosis
  • 29.10: Accessory tragus
  • 29.11: Omphalomesenteric duct polyp
  • 29.12: Accessory nipple (supernumerary nipple, polythelia)
  • Chapter 30: Special Stains
  • References and Further Reading
  • Index
  • Multiple Choice Questions for Website

Product details

  • No. of pages: 480
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2021
  • Published: February 2, 2021
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323461290
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323417884

About the Author

Ronald Rapini

Affiliations and Expertise

Chernosky Distinguished Professor and Chairman Department of Dermatology Professor of Pathology University of Texas Medical School and MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX, USA

Ratings and Reviews

Write a review

There are currently no reviews for "Practical Dermatopathology"