Postharvest Handling

Postharvest Handling

A Systems Approach

4th Edition - December 5, 2021

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  • Editors: Wojciech Florkowski, Nigel Banks, Robert Shewfelt, Stanley Prussia
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128228463
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128228456

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Description

This newly revised fourth edition of Postharvest Handling brings new and updated chapters with new knowledge and applications from postharvest research. The revised edition brings back the aspects of preharvest conditions and their effects on postharvest quality and features new chapters on the increasingly important role of transportation and logistics. It emphasizes consumers and systems thinking for postharvest chains for fresh produce. This book also explores current challenges—including oversupply, waste, food safety, lack of resources, sustainability — and best practices for systems to thrive in spite of these challenges. This unique resource provides an overview of postharvest systems and their role in food value chains and offers essential tools to monitor and control the handling process.Written by a team of experts in Postharvest Systems and Handling, this book continues to be the most practical and up-to-date resource for postharvest physiologists and technologists across the disciplines of agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, food science, and horticulture along with businesses handling fresh or minimally processed products.

Key Features

  • Features new chapters on packaging, transportation and logistics, and postharvest in the context of systems approach
  • Brings aspects of pre-harvest conditions and their effects on postharvest quality
  • Provides an overview of the postharvest system and its role in the food value chain, offering essential tools to monitor and control the handling process

Readership

Postharvest physiologists or technologists across the disciplines of agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, food sciences, and horticulture along with handlers of fresh or minimally processed products within the fresh produce processing industries will find this to be an invaluable resource. Students majoring in horticulture, food science, business and marketing, consumer economics and nutrition

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Prologue
  • Part 1: Whole system
  • Chapter 1. Postharvest systems—some introductory thoughts
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Encounters with postharvest systems
  • 1.2 Concepts in postharvest systems
  • 1.3 New paradigms in postharvest systems
  • 1.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Systems approaches for postharvest handling of fresh produce
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 2.1 Status of postharvest handling
  • 2.2 Fresh fruit and vegetable value chains
  • 2.3 Learn the unknown
  • 2.4 Examples of systems thinking
  • 2.5 Critical systems thinking
  • 2.6 Systems thinking for moving forward
  • 2.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 3. Postharvest regulation and quality standards on fresh produce
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 3.1 Setting the task
  • 3.2 “Supra”-regulations
  • 3.3 International trade regulation
  • 3.4 Regulation of the horticultural sector
  • 3.5 Fresh produce standards
  • 3.6 “Private” (within value chain) regulation
  • 3.7 Food safety
  • 3.8 On the regulation of eating quality
  • 3.9 Future regulation
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 4. Modeling quality attributes and quality-related product properties
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 What is quality?
  • 4.3 Systems approach in modeling
  • 4.4 Examples of modeling
  • 4.5 Conclusion and future developments
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Models for improving fresh produce chains
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 5.1 Background
  • 5.2 Model types
  • 5.3 Models developed for fresh produce at the University of Georgia
  • 5.4 Selected models for fresh fruit and vegetable value chains by others
  • 5.5 New models needed for fresh fruit and vegetable value chains
  • 5.6 Recommendations
  • References
  • Part 2: Product
  • Chapter 6. Challenges in handling fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Consumer-focused handling of fruits and vegetables from the consumer back to the farm
  • 6.3 Toward a more integrated approach to handling
  • 6.4 Challenges amenable to systems solutions
  • 6.5 Summary
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 7. Fresh-cut produce quality: implications for postharvest
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Cultivation management for the fresh-cut industry
  • 7.3 Processing management for fresh-cut chains
  • 7.4 Quality measurements
  • 7.5 Product innovation
  • 7.6 Future considerations
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Multiomics approaches for the improvements of postharvest systems
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Background and technologies
  • 8.3 Multiomics approaches
  • 8.4 Fruit storage and multiomics approaches
  • 8.5 Final remarks and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Postharvest quality properties of potential tropical fruits related to their unique structural characters
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Changes in quality attributes of five tropical fruits during fruit maturation and the postharvest phase
  • 9.3 Summary
  • References
  • Part 3: Process
  • Chapter 10. Value chain management and postharvest handling
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Value chain management
  • 10.3 VCM and postharvest chains
  • 10.4 The future
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Plant to plate—achieving effective traceability in the digital age
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Successful implementation of traceability
  • 11.3 Strategic considerations—understand your needs
  • 11.4 Implementing effective traceability technology within a postharvest chain
  • 11.5 The digital revolution
  • 11.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Managing product flow through postharvest systems
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Local distribution
  • 12.3 International distribution
  • 12.4 Transportation
  • 12.5 Importers/buyers/food distributors
  • 12.6 Retailers
  • 12.7 Home delivery
  • 12.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Sorting for defects
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Background
  • 13.2 Design and operation of manual sorting equipment
  • 13.3 Automated sorting
  • 13.4 Analysis of sorting operations
  • 13.5 Economics of sorting operations
  • 13.6 Summary
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 14. Nondestructive evaluation: detection of external and internal attributes frequently associated with quality and damage
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 External appearance
  • 14.3 Firmness
  • 14.4 Taste components
  • 14.5 Aroma
  • 14.6 Internal defects
  • 14.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 15. Cooling fresh produce
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 The importance of refrigeration
  • 15.3 Precooling
  • 15.4 Packaging
  • 15.5 Cold chains
  • 15.6 Logistics
  • 15.7 Cold chain management
  • 15.8 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Investigating losses occurring during shipment: forensic aspects of cargo claims
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Refrigerated maritime transport
  • 16.3 Cargo claims
  • 16.4 Legal procedure
  • 16.5 Case studies
  • 16.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 4: Perceptions
  • Chapter 17. Consumer eating habits and perceptions of fresh produce quality
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Factors impacting overall fruit and vegetable consumption
  • 17.3 Factors impacting fruit and vegetable choice
  • 17.4 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 18. What mining the text tells about minding the consumer: the changing fruit and vegetable consumption patterns and shifting research focus
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Changing fresh fruit and vegetable consumption
  • 18.3 Selection of fresh produce
  • 18.4 Application of text mining to postharvest research analysis
  • 18.5 Results of mining published abstracts of postharvest research
  • 18.6 Conclusion
  • 18.7 Appendix
  • References
  • Chapter 19. Compositional determinants of fruit and vegetable quality and nutritional value
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Nutrient components
  • 19.3 Antioxidants
  • 19.4 Allergens
  • 19.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 20. Mitigating contamination of fresh and fresh-cut produce
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Treatments to reduce microbial load
  • 20.3 Detection
  • 20.4 Future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 21. Measuring consumer acceptability of fruits and vegetables
  • Abstract
  • Abbreviations
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Experience and credence attributes
  • 21.3 Acceptability and acceptance
  • 21.4 Qualitative tests
  • 21.5 Quantitative tests
  • 21.6 Scales
  • 21.7 Extracting information
  • 21.8 Test sites
  • 21.9 Consumer segments
  • 21.10 The necessity for acceptability testing
  • References
  • Epilogue
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 702
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: December 5, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128228463
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128228456

About the Editors

Wojciech Florkowski

Wojciech J. Florkowski has over 18 years of experience in research, project management, and training. His areas of specialization and expertise include agricultural economics and international business with emphasis on marketing and consumer studies, technology transfer and assessment, environmental policy analysis, and research policy. He is the author of over 200 publications on a variety of economic, marketing, consumer and policy issues, including the problems of agricultural productivity, policy, consumer willingness-to-pay and price behavior. He co-edited “Postharvest Handling: A Systems Approach” (3rd edition)

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, USA

Nigel Banks

Nigel Banks worked as a Professor of Postharvest Technology at Massey University and at ZESPRI as General Manager for Innovation, where he learned branding, growers, consumers, ways to connect them and the added value of an outstanding team. Through Postharvest.Co, Nigel is exploring new ways to connect postharvesters, art, online tools and learning with an eye to the increasingly pressing needs of our future world.

Affiliations and Expertise

Postharvest.Co Limited, Mount Maunganui, New Zealand

Robert Shewfelt

Robert L Shewfelt is Professor Emeritus of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia. He advises more than 50 students and has taught 11 different courses in the past two years ranging from Freshman Seminars in Chocolate Science and Coffee Technology to graduate-level courses in Food Research & the Scientific Method. Dr. Shewfelt was also the 2006 recipient of the Cruess Award for Excellence in Teaching of IFT. He co-edited “Postharvest Handling: A Systems Approach” (3rd edition)

Affiliations and Expertise

The University of Georgia, Athens, USA

Stanley Prussia

Affiliations and Expertise

The University of Georgia, Griffin, USA

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