Plant Transcription Factors - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128008546, 9780128011270

Plant Transcription Factors

1st Edition

Evolutionary, Structural and Functional Aspects

Editors: Daniel Gonzalez
eBook ISBN: 9780128011270
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128008546
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 27th July 2015
Page Count: 434
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Description

Plant Transcription Factors: Evolutionary, Structural and Functional Aspects is the only publication that provides a comprehensive compilation of plant transcription factor families and their complex roles in plant biology.

While the majority of information about transcription factors is based on mammalian systems, this publication discusses plant transcription factors, including the important aspects and unifying themes to understanding transcription factors and the important roles of particular families in specific processes.

Key Features

  • Provides an entry point for transcription factor literature
  • Offers compilation of information into one single resource for rapid consultation on different plant transcription factor features
  • Integrates the knowledge about different transcription factors, along with cross-referencing
  • Provides information on the unique aspects surrounding plant transcription factors

Readership

Researchers, students and postdocs studying plant biology, cell biology, and genetics.

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Preface
  • A: General aspects of plant transcription factors
    • Chapter 1: Introduction to Transcription Factor Structure and Function
      • Abstract
      • 1.1. Introduction: Transcription in Eukaryotes
      • 1.2. Structure of Transcription Factors
      • 1.3. DNA Recognition by Transcription Factors
      • 1.4. DNA-binding Domains
      • 1.5. Protein–protein Interactions
      • 1.6. Regulation of Transcription Factor Action
      • 1.7. Plant Transcription Factors
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 2: Methods to Study Transcription Factor Structure and Function
      • Abstract
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. In vivo Functional Studies
      • 2.3. Methods for the Analysis of In Vitro Protein–DNA Interactions
      • 2.4. Methods to Study Protein–DNA Interactions In Vivo
      • 2.5. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 3: General Aspects of Plant Transcription Factor Families
      • Abstract
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Overview of the Transcription Cycle in Eukaryotes
      • 3.3. Components Involved in the Formation of the RNAPII Preinitiation Complex in Plants
      • 3.4. Plant Transcription Factor Families
      • 3.5. Major TF Families that are Conserved Across Eukaryotes
      • 3.6. Plant-Specific TF Families
      • 3.7. TFs without DBD but Interacting with DBD-Containing TFs
      • 3.8. Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 4: Structures, Functions, and Evolutionary Histories of DNA-Binding Domains of Plant-Specific Transcription Factors
      • Abstract
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Description of Respective DBDs
      • 4.3. Evolutionary History of Plant-Specific TFs
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 5: The Evolutionary Diversification of Genes that Encode Transcription Factor Proteins in Plants
      • Abstract
      • 5.1. Introduction – Distinctive Features of TF Genes in Plants (Arabidopsis and Rice)
      • 5.2. A Comparative Analysis of TF Genes Between Plants and Animals
      • 5.3. A Comparative Analysis of Transcription Factor Genes in 32 Diverse Organisms
      • 5.4. The Appearance of New TF Gene Members During Evolution
      • 5.5. The Different Evolutionary Methods of TF Genes in Animals and Plants
      • 5.6. TF Gene Evolution and Its Biological Function
      • 5.7. Conclusion: The Regulatory Role of Individual Transcription Factors
      • Acknowledgments
  • B: Evolution and structure of defined plant transcription factor families
    • Chapter 6: Structure and Evolution of Plant Homeobox Genes
      • Abstract
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Structure of the Homeodomain
      • 6.3. Specific Contacts with DNA
      • 6.4. Plant Homeodomain Families
      • 6.5. The Evolution of Plant Homeobox Genes
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 7: Homeodomain–Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors: Structural Features of These Proteins, Unique to Plants
      • Abstract
      • 7.1. Homeoboxes and Homeodomains in Eukaryotic Kingdoms
      • 7.2. Plant Homeoboxes
      • 7.3. The Plant Homeodomain Superfamily
      • 7.4. Different Domains Present in Homeodomain Transcription Factors
      • 7.5. The HD-Zip Family
      • 7.6. Target Sequences Recognized by the HD-Containing Transcription Factors
      • 7.7. What do we Know About the Target Sequences of the HD-Zip Proteins?
      • 7.8. Concluding Remarks
    • Chapter 8: Structure and Evolution of Plant MADS Domain Transcription Factors
      • Abstract
      • 8.1. Introduction: Who Cares About MADS Domain Transcription Factors?
      • 8.2. The Structure of MADS Domain Proteins
      • 8.3. Evolution of MADS Domain Transcription Factors
      • 8.4. Concluding Remarks
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 9: TCP Transcription Factors: Evolution, Structure, and Biochemical Function
      • Abstract
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Evolution of TCP Proteins
      • 9.3. The TCP Domain: Structure and Function
      • 9.4. Activation and Repression Domains
      • 9.5. TCP Factors as Intrinsically Disordered Proteins
      • 9.6. Posttranslational Modifications of TCP
      • 9.7. Concluding Remarks
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 10: Structure and Evolution of Plant GRAS Family Proteins
      • Abstract
      • 10.1. Presence of GRAS Proteins in Plants and other Organisms
      • 10.2. Genomic Organization (intron/exon)
      • 10.3. Structure of GRAS Proteins
      • 10.4. Conclusion
    • Chapter 11: Structure and Evolution of WRKY Transcription Factors
      • Abstract
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. The Structure of the WRKY Domain
      • 11.3. The Evolution of WRKY Genes
      • 11.4. R Protein–WRKY Genes
      • 11.5. Conclusion: A Reevaluation of WRKY Evolution
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 12: Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Dof Transcription Factor Family
      • Abstract
      • 12.1. Discovery and Definition of the Dof Transcription Factor family
      • 12.2. Structure and Molecular Characteristics of Dof Transcription Factors
      • 12.3. Molecular Evolution of the Dof Transcription Factor Family
      • 12.4. Physiological Functions of Dof Transcription Factors
      • 12.5. Perspective
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 13: NAC Transcription Factors: From Structure to Function in Stress-Associated Networks
      • Abstract
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. NAC Structure
      • 13.3. Evolution of NAC Proteins
      • 13.4. NAC Proteins: From Structure to Interactions with DNA and Other Proteins
      • 13.5. NAC Networks in Abiotic Stress Responses
      • 13.6. Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
  • C: Functional aspects of plant transcription factor action
    • Chapter 14: Homeobox Transcription Factors and the Regulation of Meristem Development and Maintenance
      • Abstract
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. KNOX and BELL: TALE Superfamily Homeobox Genes
      • Acknowledgment
    • Chapter 15: CUC Transcription Factors: To the Meristem and Beyond
      • Abstract
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Evolution and Structure of NAM/CUC3 Proteins
      • 15.3. NAM/CUC3 Genes Define Boundaries in Meristems and Beyond
      • 15.4. Multiple Regulatory Pathways Contribute to the Fine Regulation of NAM/CUC3 Genes
      • 15.5. NAM/CUC3 Control Plant Development via Modifications of the Cellular Behavior
      • 15.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 16: The Role of TCP Transcription Factors in Shaping Flower Structure, Leaf Morphology, and Plant Architecture
      • Abstract
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. TCP Genes and the Control of Leaf Development
      • 16.3. TCP Genes and the Control of Shoot Branching
      • 16.4. TCP Genes and the Control of Flower Shape
      • 16.5. TCP Genes Affect Flowering Time
      • 16.6. Concluding Remarks
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 17: Growth-Regulating Factors, A Transcription Factor Family Regulating More than Just Plant Growth
      • Abstract
      • 17.1. GROWTH-REGULATING FACTORs, a Plant-specific Family of Transcription Factors
      • 17.2. Control of GRF Activity
      • 17.3. Role of GRFs in Organ Growth and Other Developmental Processes
      • 17.4. Conclusion and Perspectives
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 18: The Multifaceted Roles of miR156-targeted SPL Transcription Factors in Plant Developmental Transitions
      • Abstract
      • 18.1. Introduction to Developmental Transitions
      • 18.2. miR156 and its Targets
      • 18.3. miR156-SPL Module in Timing Embryonic Development
      • 18.4. miR156-SPL Module in Juvenile-to-Adult Phase Transition in Higher Plants
      • 18.5. The miR156-SPL Module Regulates Flowering Time in Higher Plants
      • 18.6. The miR156-SPL Module in Developmental Transitions in Moss
      • 18.7. The miR156-SPL Module in Other Developmental Processes
      • 18.8. Perspectives
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 19: Functional Aspects of GRAS Family Proteins
      • Abstract
      • 19.1. The Role of GRAS Proteins in Development
      • 19.2. The Role of GRAS Proteins in Signaling
      • 19.3. General Principles of GRAS Function
      • 19.4. Conclusion
    • Chapter 20: DELLA Proteins, a Group of GRAS Transcription Regulators that Mediate Gibberellin Signaling
      • Abstract
      • 20.1. About DELLAs and Gibberellins
      • 20.2. GA Signaling through DELLAs
      • 20.3. The Molecular Mechanism of DELLA Action: DELLA–Protein Interactions and Target Genes
      • 20.4. Conclusion and Future Perspectives
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 21: bZIP and bHLH Family Members Integrate Transcriptional Responses to Light
      • Abstract
      • 21.1. The Role of Light in the Control of Plant Development: A Brief Introduction
      • 21.2. PIFs: Factors that Link Light Perception, Changes in Gene Expression, and Plant Development
      • 21.3. HFR1 and PAR1: Atypical bHLH Factors that Act as Transcriptional Cofactors
      • 21.4. HY5: A Paradigm of a bZIP Member in Integrating Light Responses
      • 21.5. Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 22: What Do We Know about Homeodomain–Leucine Zipper I Transcription Factors? Functional and Biotechnological Considerations
      • Abstract
      • 22.1. HD–Zip Transcription Factors are Unique to Plants
      • 22.2. Brief History of the Discovery of HD-Zip Transcription Factors
      • 22.3. Expression Patterns of HD-Zip I Genes
      • 22.4. Environmental Factors Regulate the Expression of HD-Zip I Encoding Genes
      • 22.5. The Function of HD-Zip I TFs from Model Plants
      • 22.6. HD-Zip I TFs from Nonmodel Species
      • 22.7. Divergent HD-Zip I Proteins from Nonmodel Plants
      • 22.8. Knowledge Acquired from Ectopic Expressors
      • 22.9. HD-Zip I TFs in Biotechnology
      • 22.10. Concluding Remarks
  • D: Modulation of plant transcription factor action
    • Chapter 23: Intercellular Movement of Plant Transcription Factors, Coregulators, and Their mRNAs
      • Abstract
      • 23.1. Introduction to Noncell-autonomous Mobile Signals
      • 23.2. Mobile Transcription Factors of the Shoot Apex in Protein Form
      • 23.3. Mobile Root Transcription Factors
      • 23.4. Transcription Factors and Coregulators that Move Long Distance Through the Sieve Element System
      • 23.5. Full-length Mobile mRNAs and their Roles in Development
      • 23.6. Conclusions
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 24: Redox-Regulated Plant Transcription Factors
      • Abstract
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Concept of Redox Regulation
      • 24.3. Redox Regulation of NPR1 During Plant Immunity
      • 24.4. Redox Regulation of Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors
      • 24.5. Redox Regulation of MYB Transcription Factors
      • 24.6. Redox Regulation of Homeodomain-leucine Zipper Transcription Factors
      • 24.7. Rap2.4a is Under Redox Regulation
      • 24.8. Redox Regulation of Class I TCP Transcription Factors
      • 24.9. Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
    • Chapter 25: Membrane-Bound Transcription Factors in Plants: Physiological Roles and Mechanisms of Action
      • Abstract
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. bZIP Transcription Factors
      • 25.3. NAC Transcription Factors
      • 25.4. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
    • Chapter 26: Ubiquitination of Plant Transcription Factors
      • Abstract
      • 26.1. The Ubiquitin Proteasome System
      • 26.2. The Ubiquitin Proteasome System and Regulation of Transcription Factor Function
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
434
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128011270
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128008546

About the Editor

Daniel Gonzalez

Affiliations and Expertise

Molecular and Cellular Biology Section, FBCB, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina