Plant Metal Interaction - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128031582, 9780128031834

Plant Metal Interaction

1st Edition

Emerging Remediation Techniques

Authors: Parvaiz Ahmad
eBook ISBN: 9780128031834
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128031582
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 28th October 2015
Page Count: 652
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Description

Plant Metal Interaction: Emerging Remediation Techniques covers different heavy metals and their effect on soils and plants, along with the remediation techniques currently available.

As cultivable land is declining day-by-day as a result of increased metals in our soil and water, there is an urgent need to remediate these effects. This multi-contributed book is divided into four sections covering the whole of plant metal interactions, including heavy metals, approaches to alleviate heavy metal stress, microbial approaches to remove heavy metals, and phytoremediation.

Key Features

  • Provides an overview of the effect of different heavy metals on growth, biochemical reactions, and physiology of various plants
  • Serves as a reference guide for available techniques, challenges, and possible solutions in heavy metal remediation
  • Covers sustainable technologies in uptake and removal of heavy metals

Readership

Academics and researchers in Environmental Sciences, Plant Ecophysiology and Plant Biochemistry, Soil Science, Agriculture

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • List of Contributors
  • About the Editor
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1. Aluminum Toxicity in Plants: An Overview
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Aluminum Toxicity
    • 3. Aluminum Uptake and Transport in Plants
    • 4. Phytotoxicity of Aluminum and Its Interactions with Nutrients
    • 5. Effects of Aluminum on Gene Expression
    • 6. Effects of Aluminum on Plant Metabolism
    • 7. Interference with Mineral Metabolism
    • 8. Interaction with Calmodulin
    • 9. Existence of Differential Aluminum Tolerance in Plants
    • 10. Tolerance Mechanisms of Aluminum
    • 11. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 2. Copper Stress and Responses in Plants
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Excess Copper is Toxic to Plants
    • 3. Effect of Copper Stress on Plant Growth
    • 4. Effects of Copper Stress on Photosynthesis
    • 5. Proline Metabolism
    • 6. Antioxidant System
    • 7. Signal Transduction in Response to Copper
    • 8. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 3. Effect of Lead on Plant and Human DNA Damages and Its Impact on the Environment
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Stress and Tolerance
    • 3. Genotoxicity of Lead in Living Organisms
    • 4. Rapid Assessment of Lead Damage on DNA
    • 5. Stimulating and Interactive Effects of Lead on Crop Plants and Microorganisms and Its Possible Tolerance by the Microorganisms
    • 6. Improvement of Crop Production Under Lead-Polluted Agricultural Soils
    • 7. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 4. Resistance of Plants to Cu Stress: Transgenesis
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Copper as an Essential Element
    • 3. Toxic Effects of High Concentrations of Copper
    • 4. Maintenance of Intracellular Cu Homeostasis
    • 5. Construction of Transgenic Plants Resistant to Heavy Metals
    • 6. Expression Genes of Compatible Osmolytes
    • 7. Transcription Factors
    • 8. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 5. Boron Toxicity and Tolerance in Plants: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Boron in Plants
    • 3. Boron Toxicity in Plants: Causes and Consequences
    • 4. Boron Tolerance
    • 5. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 6. Chromium and the Plant: A Dangerous Affair?
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Chromium in the Environment
    • 3. Speciation and Availability of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) to Plants
    • 4. Ability of Plants to Cope with Cr Toxicity
    • 5. Interaction of Plants with Cr(VI) and Cr(III): What's New?
    • 6. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 7. Selenium: An Antioxidative Protectant in Plants Under Stress
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Selenium in the Environment
    • 3. Selenium Uptake by Plants
    • 4. Role of Selenium in Plants
    • 5. Effect of Selenium on the Antioxidative Defense System
    • 6. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 8. Brassinosteroids are Potential Ameliorators of Heavy Metal Stresses in Plants
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Abiotic Stresses
    • 3. Heavy Metal Stress
    • 4. Coapplication of BRs and Other Compounds under Heavy Metal Stress
    • 5. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 9. Plant Metallothioneins: Classification, Distribution, Function, and Regulation
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Phytochelatins
    • 3. Metallothioneins
    • 4. Structure and Properties of MTs
    • 5. Classification of MTs
    • 6. Tissue Distribution and Cellular Localization
    • 7. Functions of MTs
    • 8. Transcriptional Regulation of MTs
    • 9. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 10. Responses of Phytochelatins and Metallothioneins in Alleviation of Heavy Metal Stress in Plants: An Overview
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Phytochelatins
    • 3. Metallothioneins
    • 4. Transgenic and Molecular Prospects of Phytochelatin- and MT-Induced Metal Tolerance in Plants
    • 5. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 11. Glutathione and Phytochelatins Mediated Redox Homeostasis and Stress Signal Transduction in Plants: An Integrated Overview
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Assessments of Metal-Induced Physiological and Biochemical Amendments in Higher Plants
    • 3. GSH Structure, Biosynthesis, and Function
    • 4. PC Structure, Biosynthesis, and Function
    • 5. GSH- and PC-Associated Stress Tolerance Mechanisms in Higher Plants
    • 6. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 12. Biological Remediation of Mercury-Polluted Environments
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Environmental Impact of Mercury Contamination in Soil: Mercury Distribution and Potential Bioavailability in Soil
    • 3. Soil Microorganisms: Environmental Analysis Tools
    • 4. Microorganisms in Mercury-Polluted Soils
    • 5. Strategies of Microorganisms against Mercury
    • 6. Short Survey of Mercury Impact on Soil-Bound Zoocenoses and Higher Plants
    • 7. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 13. Detoxification and Tolerance of Heavy Metals in Plants
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulation in Plants
    • 3. Major Steps Involved in Hyperaccumulation of Heavy Metals
    • 4. Biochemical Mechanism of Heavy Metal Uptake and Accumulation in Plants
    • 5. Various Cellular Mechanisms Involved in Heavy Metal Tolerance
    • 6. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 14. Plants Used for Biomonitoring and Phytoremediation of Trace Elements in Soil and Water
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Crop Plants Proposed for Biomonitoring of Trace Elements in Soils
    • 3. Crop Rotation for Biomonitoring of Trace Elements in Soil
    • 4. Freshwater Vascular Plants Proposed for Biomonitoring of Trace Elements in Waters
    • 5. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 15. Phytoextraction: The Use of Plants to Remove Heavy Metals from Soil
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Need for Remediation
    • 3. Phytoremediation Criteria and Aspects: Considerations
    • 4. Phytoremediation Techniques and Phytoextraction Efficiency
    • 5. Hyperaccumulators and Nonhyperaccumulators
    • 6. Induced Phytoextraction
    • 7. Heavy Metal Uptake Mechanisms of Plant
    • 8. Drawbacks: An Insight into the Reality
    • 9. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 16. Duckweed: An Efficient Hyperaccumulator of Heavy Metals in Water Bodies
    • 1. Duckweeds: An Introduction
    • 2. Specific Diversity and Taxonomic Classification
    • 3. Test Organism in Ecotoxicological Testing
    • 4. Role in Wastewater Reclamation
    • 5. Management of Metal Hyperaccumulator Duckweed Plants
    • 6. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 17. Genetic Strategies for Advancing Phytoremediation Potential in Plants: A Recent Update
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Genetic Engineering and Phytoremediation
    • 3. Classic Genetic Studies and a Modern Approach for Improving Phytoremediation
    • 4. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 18. Phytoremediation of Saline Soils for Sustainable Agricultural Productivity
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Salinity: Challenge to Global Food Security
    • 3. Changes in Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Soil
    • 4. Removal of Salts from Soil
    • 5. Improvement in Soil Fertility
    • 6. Selection of Plants for Phytoremediation
    • 7. Limitations of Phytoremediation
    • 8. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 19. Potential of Plants and Microbes for the Removal of Metals: Eco-Friendly Approach for Remediation of Soil and Water
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Metal Tolerance in Plants
    • 3. Metal Removal by Aquatic and Terrestrial Plants
    • 4. Application of Transgenic Plants in Phytoremediation
    • 5. Metal Tolerance in Bacteria
    • 6. Metal Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation by Bacteria
    • 7. Microbe-Assisted Phytoremediation
    • 8. Microbial Mechanisms of Plant Growth Promotion and Metal Uptake
    • 9. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 20. Microbially Assisted Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal–Contaminated Soils
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Root-Associated Microorganisms
    • 3. Phytoremediation with Plant-Associated Bacteria
    • 4. Mechanisms by Which Microbes Influence Heavy Metal Accumulation
    • 5. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 21. Land Reformation Using Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacteria in the Context of Heavy Metal Contamination
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminants
    • 3. Plant Mechanisms for Metal Detoxification
    • 4. Applications of Plant Growth–Promoting Bacteria in Heavy Metal Detoxification
    • 5. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 22. Heavy Metal Stress and Molecular Approaches in Plants
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. HM: Micronutrients to Soil Contaminants
    • 3. Plant Strategies to Tolerate HM Toxicity
    • 4. Effect of HMs on Productivity
    • 5. Climatic Changes and HM Toxicity
    • 6. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 23. Heavy Metal ATPase (HMA2, HMA3, and HMA4) Genes in Hyperaccumulation Mechanism of Heavy Metals
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Genes Associated with Heavy Metal Tolerance
    • 3. Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulating Plants
    • 4. Heavy Metals Tolerance Transporters Gene
    • 5. Conclusion and Future Prospects
  • Chapter 24. Heavy Metal Stress: Plant Responses and Signaling
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Plant Growth Response to HM Stress
    • 3. Biochemical Response
    • 4. Generation of ROS in Cells
    • 5. Oxidative Damage to Biomolecules
    • 6. Antioxidant and HM Stress
    • 7. Translocation of HMs
    • 8. Signaling in Plants Under HM Stress
    • 9. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
  • Chapter 25. Heavy Metal Stress Signaling in Plants
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Calcium-Dependent Signaling Pathway
    • 3. MAPK Cascade
    • 4. ROS Signaling
    • 5. Hormone Signaling
    • 6. Signaling Cascades Cross-Talk During Heavy Metal Stress
    • 7. Conclusions and Future Prospects
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
652
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780128031834
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128031582

About the Author

Parvaiz Ahmad

Dr. Parvaiz Ahmad is the Senior Assistant Professor in Department of Botany at Sri Pratap College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. He completed his postgraduate education in Botany in 2000 at Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India. After receiving a Doctorate degree from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi, India, he joined the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, in 2007. His main research area is Stress Physiology and Molecular Biology. He has published more than 35 research papers in peer-reviewed journals and 29 book chapters. He is a recipient of the Junior Research Fellowship and Senior Research Fellowship by CSIR, New Delhi, India. Dr. Parvaiz has been awarded the Young Scientist Award under the Fast Track scheme in 2007 by the Department of Science and Technology, of the Government of India. Dr. Parvaiz is actively engaged in studying the molecular and physio-biochemical responses of different agricultural and horticultural plants under environmental stress.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia