Physiology of Woody Plants

Physiology of Woody Plants

2nd Edition - October 7, 1996

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  • Authors: Theodore Kozlowski, Stephen Pallardy
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080538976

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Description

This completely revised classic volume is an up-to-date synthesis of the intensive research devoted to woody plants. Intended primarily as a text for students and a reference for researchers, this interdisciplinary book should be useful to a broad range of scientists from agroforesters, agronomists, and arborists to plant pathologists, ecophysiologists, and soil scientists. Anyone interested in plant physiology will find this text invaluable.

Key Features

  • Includes supplementary chapter summaries and lists of general references
  • Provides a solid foundation of reference information
  • Thoroughly updated classic text/reference

Table of Contents

  • Introduction. The Woody Plant Body. Vegetative Growth. Reproductive Growth. Photosynthesis. Enzymes. Energetics, And Respiration. Carbohydrates. Lipids, Terpenes, And Related Substances. Nitrogen Metabolism. Mineral Nutrition. Absorption of Water and Ascent of Sap. Transpiration and Plant Water Balance. Plant Hormones and Other Growth Regulators. Chapter Summaries. General References. Scientific Name Index. Bibliography. Subject Index.

Product details

  • No. of pages: 411
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1996
  • Published: October 7, 1996
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080538976

About the Authors

Theodore Kozlowski

Affiliations and Expertise

College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

Stephen Pallardy

Stephen Pallardy’s research interests include the physiological responses of plants to water stress and comparative water relations, and the mechanisms by which seedlings of selected woody species and ecotypes are able to resist drought stress more effectively than others. The underlying motivation for that research included understanding how selective pressures that are associated with xeric habitats influence the evolution of drought adaptations among and within species and potential genetic improvements as a result.

Affiliations and Expertise

School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, U.S.A.

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